10 Top Things You Need To Know About Osteoporosis

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by happycanuk, Nov 1, 2006.

  1. happycanuk

    happycanuk New Member

    10 Top Things You Need To Know About Osteoporosis

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and deterioration of bone tissue. This leads to increased bone fragility and risk of fracture, particularly of the hip, spine and wrist. However, knowing your risk factors can help improve your bone health and reduce your risk of developing the disease.
    Bone loss happens gradually and can progress without any symptoms or warning signs until the disease is advanced. As a result, osteoporosis is often referred to as the 'silent thief.'
    There are 1.4 million Canadians who suffer from osteoporosis. One in four women over the age of 50 and at least one in eight men over 50 have the disease. However, the disease can strike at any age.
    Since some 25 per cent of the population will be over age 65 by the year 2041, it is expected that the incidence of osteoporosis will rise steeply as the population ages.
    Doctors and patients often do not address the symptoms of osteoporosis early enough. In fact, only one third of spinal fractures will come to the attention of a physician. However, all types of spinal fractures, even those that are not clinically apparent, are linked to substantial increases in back pain, loss of height and depression.
    There are approximately 30,000 hip fractures in Canada each year. More than 70 per cent of hip fractures are osteoporosis-related.
    The cost of treating osteoporosis and its related fractures is estimated to be $1.9 billion in Canada. It is estimated that by 2018, Canada will spend at least $32.5 billion treating osteoporotic fractures.
    Building strong bones in childhood and young adulthood is your best defense against osteoporosis. Treatments are available for the prevention of the disease, and there are steps you can take to reduce your risk, including eating a well-balanced diet, increasing your intake of calcium and vitamin D, maintaining an active lifestyle including weight-bearing exercises such as running or walking, and playing sports such as tennis or basketball.
    Osteoporosis should not be considered an inevitable part of aging. Early detection of low bone mineral density (BMD) and identifying risk factors could significantly reduce the onset and impact of this disease.
    The exact cause of osteoporosis is unknown. However, some major risk factors that identify people who should be assessed for osteoporosis include:
    >65 years
    Vertebral compression fracture
    Fragility fracture after age 40
    Family history of osteoporotic fracture (especially maternal hip fracture)
    Long-term use (more than three months) of Glucocorticoid therapy such as prednisone
    Medical conditions (such as celiac disease) that inhibit absorption of nutrients
    Primary hyperparathyroidism
    Tendency to fall
    Osteopenia apparent on x-ray film
    Hypogonadism
    Early menopause (before age 45)
    Minor risk factors that identify people who should be assessed for osteoporosis, include:

    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Hyperthyroidism
    Chronic anticonvulsant therapy
    Low calcium intake
    Smoker
    Excessive alcohol intake (more than 2 drinks / day)
    Excessive caffeine intake (more than 4 cups of coffee / day)
    Weight <57 kg (125 lbs)
    Weight loss >10% of weight at age 25
    Chronic heparin therapy


    April, 2006

  2. webintrig

    webintrig New Member

    I am going through this right now and my endocrineologist is very puzzled about what is going on with me.

    As well as me.

    I have had an MRI done so we are going to see the results of it.

    I have it very bad but my t-score has not reach the the final 4 t-score as of yet but it getting closer. I am in the latter 2, early 3 t-scores.

    So you see why I am concern. Not to sure what the final 4-t scores brings.

    Oh and lets not forget all the pain that FMS brings as well.

    Well, enough of my boo-whoing, thanks for the info. I was surely interested in this...to say the least... me good old memory forgets this info. within reading this!

    The refresher was nice of you! Thanks!

    Soft hugs,
  3. PVLady

    PVLady New Member

    This is excellent information, thank you!!