Alimtox Ion Cell Cleanse......hoax or real??

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Cinlou, May 14, 2008.

  1. Cinlou

    Cinlou New Member

    Thought I would share what happened at work today...A woman came in with one of theses machines and did treatment for $25....has anyone done this before?

    OMG! The color of the water after 30 minutes was unbelivable!! One employee had the worst like pooh water, filthy! Black, brown and bubbling! Detoxing of the liver and cellar debris, cheesy looking too, which was detox of yeast, some really nasty stuff!

    I will let you know tomorrow how they are felling today after the detox....they have claims that it has helped fibromyalgia...gets out heavy metals....what do you think??
    Well spoke with my friend that is a nurse and he tells me that it is some kind of chemical reaction in the water from your feet. That he had discussions with doctors about this....and toxins can not come out of your feet. I just don't know...if you can absorb things through your skin why can't it be pulled out of your feet??? Interesting...
    Anyone have comments or experience with this??
    [This Message was Edited on 05/18/2008]
  2. Cinlou

    Cinlou New Member

    bumping up
  3. Waynesrhythm

    Waynesrhythm Member

    Hi Cinlou,

    You might find the following thread entitled <a href="">Update on Ionic Foot Bath Therapy</a> to be of interest. It has a number of posts on this topic.

    I bought one of these types of machines several years ago. I thought it helped me a lot, especially with getting started in the morning. I belive it not only helped detoxify my body, but gave me a bit of extra energy.

    It was a big part of my daily therapy for about three years, and then all of a sudden, I noticed I started feeling "wired" after doing a session (about 20-30 minutes). So I put it aside for a few weeks and tried it again. Same results. Have stayed away from it now for about 3-4 years and have been thinking about giving it a try again.

    I felt it really helped me while I was able to tolerate it. I paid $2,000 for mine but just noticed it on a webiste for $1,695. My brand was called the Q-Machine, also referred to as a BioElectric Enhancement Machine (BEFE). It claims to be able to detect our own biological electrical rhythms and then enhance them, thus giving us more of our own energy.

    A casual friend who had become extremely debilitated with CFS/FM/MCS eventually made her way to some sort of detoxification clinic in Texas. There she was put on a daily regimen of these foot baths. Apparently, it caused her to expell a large amount of parasites, and she began to improve her health significantly.

    Regarding the color of the water: I have noticed that the color of the water can be different when different people do a session. However, I've also discovered that most of the coloring is due to the "oxidizing" effect that the salt water has on the metal rings in the ionic probe, and not necessarily due to the toxins released from the body.

    This was something that helped me for a while, but did not successfully "cure" me of my CFS.

    Regards, Wayne

    P.S. I started a thread a while back on <a href="">clay foot baths</a> that you may find interesting.
    [This Message was Edited on 05/19/2008]
  4. Cinlou

    Cinlou New Member

    Thank you kjm and Wayne for you response to my post...
    I will check this out some more.....
  5. matthewson

    matthewson New Member

    A common way to scam consumers is to diagnose and correct a non-existent problem. Ionic Detox practitioners do this by claiming to remove toxins and balance cellular energy. It’s a Footbath with an “array”. This is coupled to a power unit, which generates a low voltage electrical current - with both positive and negative polarities - which, due to the conductivity of saline water, work together to produce the desired effect.

    They claim that the foot bath “produces a frequency of positive and negative ions, which gently resonates through the body and stimulates all the cells within it. . . . rebalancing the cellular energy, enabling the cells to perform efficiently and . . . release any toxins that may have built up.” During the process, the water typically turns brown.Supposedly, the ions stimulate cells in the body. As a result, promoters claim that toxins are excreted from the body via pores in your feet.

    One online scam site states that “You’ll see the excreted toxins in the water. The water will change color and consistency—from orange, brown through to black.” Yellow is said to come from the kidneys and bladder; orange/brown from the joints; green/dark brown to black from the liver, gall bladder and/or bowel; and white from the lymphatic system. Grease or fat particles may float on top of the water.

    The above claims are pure pseudo-science. Most of the listed conditions do not have a toxic basis. Positive and negative ions cannot “resonate” throughout the body in response to any such device. And the skin has no ability to excrete toxins. Real detoxification of foreign substances takes place in the liver, which modifies their chemical structure so they can be excreted by the kidneys which filter them from the blood into the urine.

    Many skeptics suspected that the color change produced by the Aqua Detox was caused by rust (oxidized iron), rather than toxins. Ben Goldacre, who writes the “bad science” column for Guardian Unlimited (an online British newspaper), investigated by using a car battery to send current through two metal nails that he placed into a bowl of salt water. The water turned brown and developed some sludge on the surface. Then he sent a colleague to get “detoxed” and collect before-and-after water samples. Laboratory testing showed that in both cases, the change of water color was due to greatly increased iron content.

    Thus it appears that:

    The color change is due mainly to the precipitation of rust created by corrosion of the electrodes, and
    The water would change color regardless of whether or not a foot was placed in it.

    The Guardian Unlimited article has had some impact on how the Aqua Detox and its imitators are marketed. Some marketers admit that the colors are due entirely to electrode conversion, and there is less emphasis on toxin removal and more emphasis on the “balancing” of “energy” that is not measurable with scientific instruments (and is therefore untestable.)

    A footbath, ionic or not, can’t detox your body or rebalance cellular energy.

    This is the article that from the link posted above.

    Take care, Sally

  6. courtney158

    courtney158 New Member

    I just tried the Alimtox Ion cleaning at our local county fair in Ventura County. I Paid $20:00 DOLLARS and I can't say Feel really different or better the next day. I have been cleansing with a tea cleanser and for a while it wasn't making any deference.
  7. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Active Member

    Foot detoxes are a hoax!
  8. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    I tried one recently at my chiro's office. The water turned all sorts of awful colors, and the literature explained that most of that was due to the water itself, and was not toxins coming from my body.

    I felt okay, nothing different after the footbath, but by the middle of the night I knew something was going on, and the next day I felt like I'd been hit by a truck. It took me 3 days to get over it. I know I was detoxing, I detox so much, at the drop of a hat (e.g., have a very low tolerance for chlorella because of detoxing)

    The literature said that the main effect of the foot bath was to induce my body to start detoxing on its own, and I think that's what happened. I'm not going to argue the science of this with anyone - I just know what I experienced.

    I don't remember the name of the machine my chiro used, but can find out. I haven't gone back because I have not felt up to going through that again.

    Here's a blurb from one site:

    "People love the effects of our ionic foot baths; they find themselves more relaxed and relieved of tension and stress. But what is an ion and how does it work? People go to a foot spa and avail themselves of a detox foot bath but what happens during the ionic foot bath? We'll try to explain

    A negative ion is an atom that has lost or gained one or more electrons causing it to become negatively charged. This negative ion is smaller than a molecule which allows it to be easily absorbed by the body through the process of osmosis. The scientific term of Osmosis is used to describe the movement of particles through a membrane from a higher concentration to a lower concentration. In this case the higher concentration refers to the negative ions produced by the ion field that is set up by placing the array into the water.

    All Detox Foot Baths operate through a process called electrolysis. This is done by generating the proper amount of current in the foot bath water causing the molecules of H2O to divide producing negative ions. Once the negative ions are present in the water, the body absorbs these ions through osmosis

    The Ionic Oasis® Foot Spas generate millions of these negative ions during the foot bath session. This causes the body to absorb as many negative ions as possible. You could compare this process to a fully charged battery. When it has been fully charged it can not absorb anymore energy.

    All foreign matter such as harmful chemicals, heavy metals, parasites, and others are all positively charged. The negative ion seeks out a positive molecule to attach to. Once attached to these foreign substances the body can readily eliminate them naturally through its own natural processes. This is the reason why a person should only do a foot bath session 2 or 3 times a week. Some of the impurities are transferred through the feet during the detox foot bath session, however, once the body has absorbed such a high amount of negative ions it begins to eliminate these toxins naturally over a period of days.