Anti-Biotics 3rd on list for treating Arthritis "Time Magazine"

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by AJME, Dec 6, 2002.

  1. AJME

    AJME New Member

    This article is from the new issue of Time Magazine. Cover is titled "ARTHRITIS".

    Funny how Anti-Biotics slows erosion of cartlidge in Arthritis sufferers. There are many studies that show Anti-Biotics signficantly help arthritis sufferers. I wonder how much of a roll Anti-Biotics can help with FM sufferers. I wonder how much does bacteria (mycoplasma) play in both Arithris and FM. Article excerpt (time.com for rest) below:......

    Posted Sunday, December 1, 2002; 10:31 a.m. EST
    DRUGS

    Over-the-counter painkillers:
    For mild pain, acetaminophen should be your first choice, since it relieves discomfort without damaging the digestive tract. If pain persists, your doctor may recommend aspirin or ibuprofen, which can reduce the swelling and damage due to inflammation; anti-inflammatory drugs, however, can be harsh on the stomach

    COX-2 inhibitors:
    These newer analgesics tend to cause fewer stomach problems than traditional anti-inflammatories. But they are expensive, and recent studies have linked them to heart problems

    Tetracycline:
    These antibiotics were designed to kill germs, but they can also slow erosion of the cartilage

    Hyaluronic Acid:
    Injections of this natural lubricant, particularly in the knee, can ease pain for as long as a year

    Corticosteroids:
    Shots of steroids, which reduce inflammation, can provide a short-term fix for joint pain. Continued injections, however, can worsen a damaged joint by masking discomfort and enabling you to continue destructive activities. Because their pain is limited to specific joints, osteoarthritis sufferers don't need the wider-ranging effects of corticosteroid pills
  2. AJME

    AJME New Member

    This article is from the new issue of Time Magazine. Cover is titled "ARTHRITIS".

    Funny how Anti-Biotics slows erosion of cartlidge in Arthritis sufferers. There are many studies that show Anti-Biotics signficantly help arthritis sufferers. I wonder how much of a roll Anti-Biotics can help with FM sufferers. I wonder how much does bacteria (mycoplasma) play in both Arithris and FM. Article excerpt (time.com for rest) below:......

    Posted Sunday, December 1, 2002; 10:31 a.m. EST
    DRUGS

    Over-the-counter painkillers:
    For mild pain, acetaminophen should be your first choice, since it relieves discomfort without damaging the digestive tract. If pain persists, your doctor may recommend aspirin or ibuprofen, which can reduce the swelling and damage due to inflammation; anti-inflammatory drugs, however, can be harsh on the stomach

    COX-2 inhibitors:
    These newer analgesics tend to cause fewer stomach problems than traditional anti-inflammatories. But they are expensive, and recent studies have linked them to heart problems

    Tetracycline:
    These antibiotics were designed to kill germs, but they can also slow erosion of the cartilage

    Hyaluronic Acid:
    Injections of this natural lubricant, particularly in the knee, can ease pain for as long as a year

    Corticosteroids:
    Shots of steroids, which reduce inflammation, can provide a short-term fix for joint pain. Continued injections, however, can worsen a damaged joint by masking discomfort and enabling you to continue destructive activities. Because their pain is limited to specific joints, osteoarthritis sufferers don't need the wider-ranging effects of corticosteroid pills
  3. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    I am staying as far away from antibiotics as I can, unless I have a life threatening illness, that would only respond to antibiotic therapy.

    They have caused far more harm, in my life, than good.

    This article is talking about arthritis---and a progression of cartilage damage, whereas it's my understanding that although those with FM suffer from joint pain, there is no actual damage or perceivable inflammation in these areas.

    Granted there are those who have FM in conjunction with arthritis, which I am one, but I would never consider this.
    After being on long term antibiotic therapy for 30+ years, I may never be able to conteract the damage done, by the daily doses I received.
    Karen
  4. karen55

    karen55 New Member

    picking the lesser of two evils, in a sense. Overuse of antitiotics has created multi drug resistant bacterias and we all know about the consequences of being on antibiotics, including yeast, which is another big problem. I'm allergic to quite a few antibiotics, including tetracycline. Like Karen2002, I have arthritis too and I'll pass on this particular treatment.
  5. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Jelly, I did not see the mycoplasma mentioned, was the very first few lines from the article also, or are you referring to the mention of bacteria???

    Jaci
  6. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    Jaci-Isn't RA an autoimmune disease, with the patients having a rheumatoid factor antibody? I don't see the benefits of treating an autoimmune disease with antibiotic therapy.
    Ajme
    I do not see the connection , when you say antibiotics help arthritis suffers, and you wonder if they will help w/ fm.
    Granted there are some fm suffers who are treating mycoplasma infections. Not all FM'ers have mycoplasma infectons.
    Since joints in FM show no inflammation as arthritic joints do---what would be the purpose.

    If antibiotics were going to help my fm----they should have done so---I have been on a regime for 30+ years....we are talking daily prophylactic doses....so I never should have developed fm.

    Candida Albicans can intrude into joints, as well, due to permeability of the gut. If joint pain is caused by fungi or bacteria, then treatment with an anti-fungal or antibiotic would be in order. (If one is willing to use knowing the risks of each) I would have to have the proof---
    and then would probably still opt for another method of treatment.
    Karen