Anyone else had palpatations?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by TeddiAnn, Dec 1, 2002.

  1. TeddiAnn

    TeddiAnn New Member

    Dear Friends,

    Today's "tip of the day" really struck a cord with me!!! In July after a hard day my pulse was so intense in at my throat that I made my husband take me to the emergency room.
    My blood pressure was 180 over 90 and I had to be taken into the emergency room my wheelchair after I collasped in the parking lot. Six hours and several tests later, four doctors could not find anything wrong with me. After telling them that I had Fibromyalgia they sent me home with a report stating that I had Fibromyalgia but didn't state any cautionary actions or treatments. My then doctor also did not give me any information (he is no longer my doctor). I had never had palpations before but I found out about it by reading a book on Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Since July I have tried to keep stress and anxiety under control. Anyone else had palpations. I am intersted in what kinds of treatments or suggestions that you may have.
  2. TeddiAnn

    TeddiAnn New Member

    Dear Friends,

    Today's "tip of the day" really struck a cord with me!!! In July after a hard day my pulse was so intense in at my throat that I made my husband take me to the emergency room.
    My blood pressure was 180 over 90 and I had to be taken into the emergency room my wheelchair after I collasped in the parking lot. Six hours and several tests later, four doctors could not find anything wrong with me. After telling them that I had Fibromyalgia they sent me home with a report stating that I had Fibromyalgia but didn't state any cautionary actions or treatments. My then doctor also did not give me any information (he is no longer my doctor). I had never had palpations before but I found out about it by reading a book on Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Since July I have tried to keep stress and anxiety under control. Anyone else had palpations. I am intersted in what kinds of treatments or suggestions that you may have.
  3. lease79

    lease79 New Member

    Do I have palps!
    I had a couple of bouts of tachycardia (abnormally fast hb) before I got pregnant with this baby. Since then things have gone outright CRAZY!
    I have had times where I have actual palpitations (abnormal beat) & other times where it's the tacyycardia.
    I have been checked out & an ECG done whilst in the middle of one of these 'attacks', but it showed nothing?????
    Seems now on top of it all I have developed Panic Attacks which are not pleasant.
    My Doc has given me breathing exercises to do to clam myself down & they seem to work some.
    Goodluck, & I hope your new doc can help find you relief.

    Lease
  4. marcus1243

    marcus1243 New Member

    And are all part of the body's autonomic nervous system being screwed up. It's unusual for them to cause a serious hike in bp though -- that sounds more like a panic attack to me. Palpitations are nothing to be worried about -- please don't let them panic you -- they'll usually pass in seconds.
    Best wishes,
    Marcus
  5. Kim

    Kim New Member

    I've had palpitations all of my adult life. I have mitral valve prolapse, which is very common, especially in women with fibromyalgia.

    I have PVCs which are premature beats and feel like a flip flop. I also used to get SVT often. That is where your heart takes off and beats in a very rapid, but normal rhythm. I've had echocardiograms, ekgs, and even a electrophysiological study where they passed a catheter into my femoral artery and ran it into my heart and did an electrical study. They found an extra pathway in the upper chamber of my heart that causes the SVT. The bottom line is that this is VERY common and will not kill you. I still get scared when I get palpitations but I have found many things that help.

    Reducing stress

    Not eating anything that causes indigestion or acid reflux (this is because the vagal nerve runs up the stomach past the heart and when your stomach is jumpy, your heart can react with palpitations).

    Taks lots of magnesium (all the cardiologists are prescribing magnesium for arrhythmia patients. I take 1,200 mg. a day)

    Keep hydrated with water but don't drink with a meal or within two hours after a meal (your food needs to digest)

    Palpitations correlate to your hormone levels so be aware of where you are in your cycle. This goes for pregnant and menopausal women too.

    Exercise as much as possible to get rid of the fight/flight response and to strengthen your heart. Walking and stretching are best. Swimming or just moving around in a warm pool helps too.

    Avoid bending over after you've eaten or had lots to drink.

    Avoid all caffeine, chocolate, and other stimulants (unfortunately some of the medicine we are prescribed contain stimulants or produce a stimulant effect like antidepressants).

    Get a massage.

    Get enough sleep (easier said than done for us, huh?)

    Sleeping on your left side can cause palpitations, so can twisting your body.

    There's so much more. I've found certain foods cause palpitations for me and so does eating fast and rushing around.

    Best wishes.

    Kim
  6. TaniaF

    TaniaF Member

    I have had palps and SVT for over 25 years. Yes, an attack is scary but not life threatening. Panic goes along with it. All the advice above is great and helpful. It got to a point when I was getting palps everyday that my cardiologist put me on a calcium channel blocker to keep things regular. He also ordered me Xanax (dot dose) to stay calm. My ANS system is out of wack and I didn't know so many FM patients have this. If you just get this occasionally and it doesn't upset your lifestyle--just do the natural things to get over the spells. If you get this daily or frequently there are meds to control the PVC's. Seeing a good cardiologist will ease your mind.
    Tania
  7. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    When I stop my HRT, so I guess I'll stay on it.

    Love, Mikie
  8. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    May I also add that you should have an Echocardiogram done to see if you have an MVP (75% of FMS patients do) because there are antibiotics that must be taken during surgery or dental work if you have an MVP, in order to prevent a serious heart infection called Bacterail Endocarditis. This is a simple, non-invasive test that takes about 15 minutes.
    Here is an important tip: drink as little as possible for 12 hrs. before the Echocardiogram.....many MVP's are missed because the patient was well-hydrated. Also, if you do turn out to have an MVP, you need to drink 1/2 gal. of water each day for each 50 lbs. you weigh to keep the valve hydrated. This will cut down on the palpitations a lot. If you have MVP, besides taking magnesium, you should also take at least 60 mgs. of COQ10 daily. This has lowered my palpitations by about 80%.
    Klutzo
  9. LanaJ

    LanaJ New Member

    Mine started several years ago, before any suspicion of fibro. Palpatations are very common even without fibro. If you stress out over them, them will feel worse. I did end up in the hospital for 4 days, though, mostly to get checked out and a medication change. The first night was scary, though. I didn't have any pain, but I swear there was a huge fish in my chest flopping around. i buzzed the nurses to be sure my monitor was working and they weren't worried, so I decided it must be Ok, but I sure didn't like it. I especially notice it coming up to that time of the month. Hormones do affect you. My heart also skips all the time. Most of the time I don't feel it, but sometimes, if I am pushing too hard, I can feel it "kick in". When it is doing that, I get really tired.
  10. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    One of my doctors says everybody gets them, but most don't notice. My hubby gets them too. I get them on occasion....it comes and goes in spurts. They can be caused by food sensitivities, estrogen surges caused by perimenopause that starts in our 30's, anxiety and FM. Doctors say they are benign, but they are intimidating at first. After awhile, with the knowledge that they are harmless, you learn to cope with them pretty well. Palps scare most of us, so that would cause us to become anxious and maybe have a panic attack, leading to an escalated heartrate and bp. Best thing that works for me, is to plunge my face in ice water, or just plain old cold water from the bathroom tap. Also wet down your arms real good, then go stand in front of a fan. This takes your system's mind off your heart, and it gets back to normal on it's own. That cold water feels pretty darned good too!! (this was advice from my doctor after I had my heart wake me up one night going 220 beats per minute...scared me to DEATH!!)

    Also cut out all caffeine!!

    Marilyn :)
  11. cls

    cls New Member

    I get those also, also some SVT's which other members have noted that they get also (this was determined after I wore a heart monitor for a week. I had so many that my doc gave me a stress test (results normal) and put me on a calcium channel blocker, which has reduced the number of occurances a lot. Believe it or not, my chiropractor makes an adjustment when I get an increase in the palpitations and that helps also. I would not just use the chiro to treat these though. It can be scary, and sometimes when a palpitation is very noticible you think "is this going to be something?" and then it just stops. When they first started happening I got very nervous and b/p went up, but now I know that it is not an unusual symptom I don't get upset about it anymore. I do watch my caffeine intake, if I have too much caffeine they do increase.
  12. Madelyn

    Madelyn New Member

    I sometimes get nighttime palpitations. You know,I juuuust get to sleep for a few minutes and wham! my heart is beating so fast and hard it's alarming. Not so much lately. I've been to the ER, had two stress echocardiograms, I'm told everything's okay. About four years ago, I was in the midst of a depression. I was having these two or three times a week. I learned to just walk around, stay calm, breathe. I learned to wait it out, it will pass.

    I still dread them, but that period taught me that it will
    be okay. I don't even wake up my husband anymore. It is scarey, though, because you start to think what if it gets worse and worse and... but it won't. Just don't allow yourself to panic. Of course, the thing that touches it off is stress.
  13. Bellesmom

    Bellesmom New Member

    I have been experiencing this thing called "palpitations" but didn't realize it had a name and that so many others were dealiing with it. Thank you so much for all the info.

    I have not seen anyone in all my Internet travels talk about living with fibromyalgia without any health insurance or resources to see a specialist. From what I read maybe going to a specialist is not such a big deal after all!

    I am 61 and diagnosed by PCP for 2 years now. He is very indifferent to my dilemma and I am also pursuing a reconsideration on a turned down disability claim.

    Thanks for listening.
  14. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I have noticed that when I go to bed at night and lay on my side, my heartrate speeds up about 15 beats per minute. Then, I'll flop over on my back and it settles down to normal. Does anyone know WHY this happens?

    Marilyn :)
  15. Kim

    Kim New Member

    If you lay on your left side sometimes your heart will throw PVCs because of blood flow. Also sometimes when you change positions your blood pressure will change causing an increase in rate. Another thing that causes PVCs that even some cardiologists don't recognize is indigestion, especially acid reflux. If you have palpitations at night try not eating for at least five hours before going to bed.

    I'm having PVCs tonight and I think it was because I ate too fast and too much for dinner plus I ate a lot of fat (good fat, though) and fat slows down the food passing out of your stomach.

    The other thing is that drinking water is good but sometimes drinking water can cause acid reflux and then palpitations so the timing of eating and drinking is very important.

    I've had to deal with palpitations for years.

    If they're really bad at night, elevate your head and lay on your back. Deep breathing and relaxing music can help.

    Even though I know they're harmless and I've had every test in the book, the still scare me when they start up.
  16. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    No, I don't have palps when laying on my side, my heart SPEEDS up, and then when I switch to my back, it slows back to normal. I also don't have reflux.

    Marilyn :)
  17. 1Writer

    1Writer New Member

    Especially when I lay down at night, so I got into bio-feedback...I started doing relaxation exercises; you know, starting with my head and working my way down to my feet...that worked really good until I only made it half-way , my heart would slow down and I would fall asleep. Now, I go to sleep listening to a CD of rain and thunder...it's so calming...I LOVE it! I sleep like a baby most nights. Give it a try...you never know! Oh, I also take Klonopin (one) and 2 benedryl at night to help me sleep...the combination of the rain and the meds works GREAT! Good luck!
    1Writer

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