anyone else suffer from fm related panic attacks?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by romey, Jun 7, 2003.

  1. romey

    romey New Member

    hi! the title says it all really does anyone else suffer from fm related panic (anxiety) attacks.id really like to know cause im starting to feel quite isolated when its comes to this problem.i have been having anxiety attacks when im completely calm.somtimes im just reading.i read fm can cause them something to do with chest recstirtion.but my family dont really understand .im 4ever being told to just calm down. does any know of any kind of relif 4 it?
  2. layinglow

    layinglow New Member

    Romey, you can explain to your family that many with FM have neuralogical symptoms that go along with this disorder. There is a subset of patients with FM that suffer from mini-seizure activity, according to Dr. Chaney, a reknowned specialist. Many other of the specialist agree that the amount of dysfunction and dysregulation in the central nervous system is a cause for such symptoms.

    Some exhibit myclonic jerking, which is an involuntary jerking of the limbs, and can involve the trunk, neck, head, and facial features.
    Many experience sensory overload--or overstimulation from external input. It's quite common.
    Panic or anxiety attacks are another malady of this, caused by the same mechanisms, as well as racing brain.

    One of the best drugs in the opinion of specialists for this is klonopin. It is an anti-seizure, anti-anxiety drug, and it keeps those neurons from firing without cause and to an extreme. Most start out at a very low doseage of .5 mg. These can be placed under the tongue at the first sign of these symptoms, and bring it to a halt.

    You can find more about this, in the Library here, if you look up Dr. Chaney, and Klonopin.

    Both my husband (FMS) and myself FMS,MCS,CFS) are on klonopin for symptom management. We also feel, as others do, that this prevents damage to the brain, (neurons eventually not able to fire) when these events are allowed to take place.

    Best wishes, LL

    I forgot to mention, that there are doctors who are afraid to prescribe klonopin, as they are misinformed about addiction. Tolerance does take place, but does vary from individual to individual. There are many here who have taken the same initial dose for a long time. This is not a drug to stop suddenly--and that is where the dependence falls into place. Addiction or misuse would be far fetched here, as there is no high obtained from it.

    You might find a doctor more willing to prescribe Neurontin, for these symptoms, however, and that is a good choice, too. It will prevent the mini-seizure activity, and hyperactivity of the Central Nervous System.
    [This Message was Edited on 06/07/2003]
  3. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    If you are having panic attacks while being completely calm, then they are no doubt caused by estrogen surges. I don't know how old you are, but our estrogen starts surging up and down during perimenopause which can start in our 30's and it gets worse as we get older and enter menopause. Panic attacks are common in anyone with FM, but they're also common in anyone with hypothyroidism and alot of people with FM have hypothyroidism, plus they're at the age for perimenopause. Sooooo....you can figure that the panic attacks are from one of the three. If it's from hypothyroidism, they usually stop when the endocrinologist gets your thyroid straightened out with hormone treatment.....which can take months! If they're from perimenopause, I don't know what to tell ya, because HRT is no longer recommended. Just know you're not alone and when you DO have a panic attack, breathe deeply with your stomach, IN through your nose, and out through your mouth, like you're whistling. Inhale to the count of 7, hold it for about 4 secs, then slowly exhale. Do this 3 or 4 times, with your stomach, not your chest, and the panic will quickly subside. Drink lots of water, cut out the caffeine and sugar, and get lots of rest. There's many ways to cut down on panic attacks.

    Good luck!
    Marilyn :)
  4. Jen F

    Jen F New Member

    Hi Romey.

    Sounds like SS Marilyn had something interesting to say.

    The longer I've been sick with CFS, the more other problems I have developed, esp with my nervous system becoming more sensitive.

    That has included experiencing occasional anxiety attacks.

    One of the other weird problems involves my nervous system getting easily overstimulated -- If I get together with a group of people, I can't wind down or sleep for hours afterwards -- it's strange, but I know of other people with CFS experiencing same phenomenon.
  5. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    Hi Romey, welcome to the board. I see you have already received some great adivce with the panic attacks.

    If its not your thyroid like Marilyn was speaking of, I take magnesium glycinate, most of us are deficient in this mineral that have FM/CFS. It is a natural tranqualizer, plus it helps with the pain too.

    I do have Xanax, and will take a low dose of it if the panic gets too bad. Of course it always works.

    The deep breathing is wonderful too, that helps me a lot since I found out about it.

    Jen, I know exactly how you feel. When I am around people I get so panicky that its ridiculous, I will even get like that talking on the phone sometimes. My lips will feel like they are getting numb :)

    If I have company or am going to a function, I take the darn piece of Xanax. Otherwise I am totally wiped out when I get home or the company leaves.

    That is one thing about this illness that really ticks me off. I use to be a 'people person', could work a room and enjoy it, could talk to a 'post' as my husband calls it, now I would simply like to live like a hermit.

    Sometimes I hate when the phone rings. I can feel the panic coming on for no reason whatsoever.

    Shalom, Shirl
  6. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    and I would add that estrogen dominance, which can cause these symptoms, can be corrected with Progesterone drops. You will need a holistic doctor to get a prescription for this. Same for the thyroid, since conventional medicine has been slow to recognize that the "normal" range for thyroid hormone is much too wide. Many of us also have an adrenal imbalance which can be treated with a small amt. of natural cortisone. When a person runs out of cortisone due to stress, all they have left to deal with it is adrenalin. This hormone causes an "emergency" feeling which can turn into panic. Constantly using adrenalin to address stress can cause reactive hypoglycemia, which many of us also have. If you are at that point, then you will need a high protein/low carbohydrate diet as well in order to get better. You may be amazed once the hormones are treated, and your diet is evened out, how many of your brain dysfunctions were being caused by hormone imbalances. It's no coincidence that most Fibro people are female.
    Klutzo
  7. romey

    romey New Member

    L,L (and everyone else who replyed)thank you so much for detailed and efficent advice.im very grateful that all of you took the time to answer my question.i now have plans to join a yoga class to help with relaxation.also every body seems to know eachother so i guess i should introduce myself.my name is romey im 18 years old (and a girl!)i live in ireland and i found out last summer i have fm .its been hard because there is barely any reconignition of fm here. you are the only fm suffers i have spoken to and it has been very helpful so thanks!
  8. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I forgot all about the supplements, especially calcium and mag, nature's relaxant... Then there's the progesterone cream or drops, I've heard they work wonders too. I remember when my adrenals were out of whack, and I was in a continual state of panic every waking hour and that was about 23 hours a day. It was a nightmare life, but after working real hard at it, my adrenals seemed to restore themselves and I finally came down out of the clouds and started feeling normal. I can certainly understand why some people with panic disorder commit suicide. (they usually don't relize this problem can be fixed) It's one miserable way to live and I never want to go through that again, ever!

    Marilyn :)
  9. ssMarilyn

    ssMarilyn New Member

    I've heard of some people that had similar problems to yours, and they needed to be "desensitized".... Maybe you've been alone and out of the loop too long and now your system is overly sensitive? Just a thought....a passing thought! :)

    Marilyn :)
  10. DebP

    DebP New Member

    Hello romey,
    I have suffered with these panic attacks for about 3 years now. They happen for no reason and I cant control them. One thing that has helped me is Klonopin. Since the doc put me on this 1mg 2x a day I pretty much have a handle on them unless im having a really bad day.....You may want to mention this to your doc if you have one...Hope this helps you, I know they are no fun!!

    Hugs, Deb
  11. jka

    jka New Member

    i do the same thing.i can be sitting watching tv and suddenly feel like i'm going to jump out of my skin.going out side and walking helps sometimes.my doc has also given me oxazepam for when it gets bad.also i take sedacalm(natural)which has lupulus,valerian root,l-glutamine,whole piuitary,b2,b6.it helps some

    kathy c
  12. spatialbean

    spatialbean New Member

    if what happens to me is a panic attack. Recently I went grocery shopping with a friend to help me. I was nervous that I was going to take too long and I could not think of what I needed and I hadn't made a list. Then my friend got a tabloid and started to read it outloud to me and at that point I began to shake and cry. I wanted to run out of the store. I was overly tired by the time we got to the store, it was the end of a day of errands she was helping me with. I think all the people at the store, the voices, trying to select things, trying to remember what I needed, trying not to cry and then my friend wanting to entertain me by reading to me just sent me over the edge.

    Is that a panic attack?

    Love,
    Claudia
  13. Dara

    Dara New Member

    thought I would "bump" this up to help answer the questions that Spudzy has asked.

    Dara