Appt with Dr. Gruenn (re peptide therapy)

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by mbofov, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    Hi all - I finally saw Dr. Gruenn last Thursday (2/9) and am finally starting to feel human again. I didn't get the peptide injection (will explain) but crashed rather badly after the trip. It was a grueling drive down, 2-1/2 hours in heavy traffic, while fasting, and an easy drive home of a bit over an hour. Anyways, the trip knocked me for a loop, as I knew it would.

    I liked Dr. Gruenn very much. I brought a stack of lab work and reports and he did his best to go over it rather quickly and also asked a lot of questions. He wants more info before doing the injection, and has asked me to get a cardiac workup which I have scheduled near where I live, and he may order some more testing before my next appt.

    At my next appt (on March 6), he's going to also do something called an electrodermal test in his office (not covered by Medicare, cost $120), and then I'll see him right after that. He'll go over the cardiac report, and this test, and any other new tests, and we will decide then whether or not I should try the injections. I think he is a bit puzzled by me, but I am so glad he is trying to get to the bottom of things.

    And I am extremely fortunate that for my next appt I can go down the day ahead and stay at a very kind friend's house, so will not have to fight the morning L.A. rush hour and the trip will be much easier physically on me.

    So I'm a little disappointed I did not get the injection, but at the same time I am impressed by Dr. Gruenn and his wanting more information.

    Also - he noticed on my lab work that my vitamin D level was somewhere around 45, said it should be 75 (which no doctor has ever told me) and told me to double what I'm already taking, 5,000 IU, to 10,000 for about 2 months. So he is observant, intelligent and knowledgable, and actually listened to me! It was worth the trip.

    Mary
  2. panthere

    panthere Member

    Glad you liked to Dr. Gruenn. I have a phone apt with him on tuesday and looking forward to catching up (haven't talked to him in 2 years!) Electroderman testing is done by his wife and it's similar to biomeridian machine (VOL) if you have heard about it. It can give you a little bit more info on what's going on.
  3. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    You know, the electrodermal testing sounds vaguely familiar - I may have had it done by a chiropractor before. In any event, overall I've had very good results wtih chiropractors who do muscle testing, so have no qualms about doing this test.

    I will look up biomeridian machine - thanks for the tip!

    Mary
  4. deepak

    deepak Member

    Dear Mary,

    Just wanted to wish you good luck with the peptides and I do hope you get them :).

    Why did he say he wanted you to have a cardiac workup ?

    Love,
    deepak
  5. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    I know it's disappointing to have to wait on the injections but he sounds like such a good doc who is trying to leave nothing to chance before you start the shots. I had to delay mine as I got a resurgance of my stealth virus just before I was to start. I was running a low-grade temp and the doc was afraid the injections would not work until we got on top of it. It's so much better to be really ready when it's time to start the injections.

    I keep you in my prayers and wish you the best of luck. There are different sera and the doc may be trying to check everything to select the best one for you.

    Love, Mikie
  6. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    Dr. Gruenn wants me to have a cardiac workup for a couple of reaons I think. One, my pulse was 86 in his office (although I think it was due to fasting and the stressful drive, and also I had stopped my potassium 1 or 2 days before, which I really seem to need).

    Two, my abnormal impedance cardiography results (see http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12920435 and http://www.cfids-cab.org/MESA/Peckerman.pdf for more info - also you can google "peckerman impedance cardiography)

    and three, I think he just wants to rule out everything that could possibly explain my crashing.

    Although I really don't think it's my heart - if you have heart problems, you have fatigue all the time, or at least immediateliy following exertion, and not some 12 hours later.

    He's being thorough, covering all the bases, and I'm glad he's doing it.

    Mary
  7. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    I'll let you know how it all comes out. By the way, I don't get pain from doing things, I don't have FM, "just" CFS with its delayed onset exhaustion.

    I hope you get some help soon. Get your adrenals checked! High cortisol can cause insomnia and weak adrenals will make you tired at the same time. A good test is the adrenal stress index test. Any doctor can order it, or go on-line to Clymer Healing Center and they can do it - this helped my severe insomnia several years ago - I would have been much worse off if I'd never dealt with my high cortisol and weak adrenals.

    Take care -

    Mary
  8. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    Thanks for your prayers and good wishes! It means a lot.

    I totally agree - it's much better to be really ready before starting the injection. I am glad he's doing these further tests, and you could be right about him trying to select the best sera. I'm glad he's thorough and feel very fortunate to have found him.

    He did tell me that if heavy metals are the culprit, then the injections won't work. So if nothing else, when I finally do get an injection, if it doesn't do anything for me, then it may be an indication that I need to deal with heavy metals.

    I'll keep y'all posted!

    Mary
  9. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    A few years ago and passed with flying colors. Once I got my hormones in balance, the palpitations, which caused me to get the workup, stopped. I'm glad I got it because heart attacks run in our family.

    My doc made sure all my labwork was up to date before we started. I've had my CFiDS/ME, FMS and Sjogren's long enough that it was pretty clear that the broad-spectrum peptide was the right one for all that ails me. It works on immune and auto-immune conditions. I have to think that it helps with additional problems because when the body is healthy, it can do all the tasks required of it.

    I consider our members my online family and I pray for us all. I've seen so much suffering here over the years that I know everyone needs hugs and prayers.

    Love, Mikie
  10. deepak

    deepak Member

    Dear Mary,

    Isnt a pulse of 86 considered normal ? Why is that a problem ? I was reading online that till 100 its considered normal although Dr Oz says uptil 90.

    Love,
    Deepak
  11. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    I think 86 is a bit high. 100 is definitely high. My normal pulse is around 75.

    Anyways, my doctor might be extra cautious, but I'm just guessing that combined with my inability to exercise etc. he wants to rule out heart trouble.

    Mary
  12. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Resting pulse rates should probably be in the 70's or lower. If one is stressed or active, a higher rate is normal, up to a point. If you take 220 and subtract your age, it gives you your maximum heart rate. Ideally, you can exercise at 80 percent of that rate for 20 mins. Doing that can lower your overall heart rate. Of course, you should only do this with your doc's permission. Most of us cannot exercise at that level. I'm hoping to as my injections help me heal. My rate is always elevated at the doctor's office as is my BP. I tend to have a high pulse rate anyway and would love to get it back down to what it was before I got sick.

    Love, Mikie
  13. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    I do know that conditioned athletes tend to have low pulse rates. Oh, wish I could exercise so much! I used to be so active (like everyone here I suspect) - I have so little patience for "healthy" people who just can't bring themseves to make an effort. They don't know what they've got ...

    Mary
  14. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Yes, healthy people do take what they have for granted. One of the silver linings of our conditions is that we don't and we appreciate everything. One of the other silver linings is that the older I get, the less I have to push the heart rate to get the results :)

    Love, Mikie