Autoimmunine Disease,What is definetion?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by tinaeve, Apr 9, 2003.

  1. tinaeve

    tinaeve New Member

    I just read a post about FM being classified as an autoimmune disease.Can any one clarify what an autoimmune disease is? I am goingto see a new rheumy next week and want to be well informed. Thanks,tinaeve
  2. kgg

    kgg New Member



    50 YEARS NIAID HOMEPAGE
    INFECTIOUS DISEASES
    IMMUNOLOGIC DISEASES
    AIDS
    THE IMMUNE SYSTEM

    NIAID HISTORY
    NIAID DIRECTORS
    WANT TO KNOW MORE?

    NIAID HOMEPAGE
    NIH HOMEPAGE
    An Attack on Self Tissues


    W hen the immune system mistakes self tissues for nonself and mounts an inappropriate attack, the result is an autoimmune disease.
    There are many different autoimmune diseases. Some examples are Wegener's granulomatosis, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis.
    Autoimmune diseases can each affect the body in different ways. For instance, the autoimmune reaction is directed against the brain in multiple sclerosis and the gut in Crohn's disease. In other diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus), affected tissues and organs may vary among individuals with the same disease.

    Many autoimmune diseases are rare. As a group, however, they afflict millions of Americans. Most autoimmune diseases strike women more often than men, particularly affecting women of working age and during their childbearing years.



    Our immune system is a complex network of specialized cells and organs that has evolved to defend the body against attacks by "foreign" invaders.


    How does the immune system
    work?


    Genetic factors
    The genes people inherit contribute to their susceptibility for developing an autoimmune disease. Certain diseases such as psoriasis can occur among several members of the same family, suggesting that a specific gene or set of genes predisposes a family member to psoriasis. In addition, individual family members with autoimmune diseases may inherit and share a set of abnormal genes, although they may develop different autoimmune diseases.
    These diseases are often chronic, requiring lifelong care and monitoring, even when the person may look or feel well. Currently few autoimmune diseases can be cured or made to "disappear" with treatment. However, many people with these diseases can live normal lives when they receive appropriate medical care.

    Scientists are searching for ways to prevent and treat these diseases by studying the immune system factors, the role of genetics, and the possible role of infectious agents




  3. tinaeve

    tinaeve New Member

    now i understand so much better.

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