B12 injections...."Again"

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by 2BPainfree, Dec 2, 2002.

  1. 2BPainfree

    2BPainfree New Member

    I just found this site which is one of "many" regarding B12
    Injections....not to push the subject, but hey...if there's something, anything that can help this fatigue...it's worth looking at! (BTW: I thought it was interesting my description of a "Feeling of well being" is the same one they used in this article!)

    Here goes:
    Vitamin B12 Injections (Hydroxocobalamin)

    Vitamin B12 injections have been used for a long time in the treatment of various problems in medicine, especially related to chronic fatigue states. However, in the past, there were few well-controlled trials looking at the efficacy of vitamin B12 injections, especially in the company of normal serum vitamin B12 levels. More recently, the use of vitamin B12 injections has been subjected to good clinical trials and shown to be very efficacious.

    In general, what one might expect from vitamin B12 is an improved sense of well being, a lifting of depression and improved sleep patterns. Many people report very colorful dreams. Fatigue is generally improved. People feel motivated to undertake many activities that they would not previously have been able to tolerate. The usual route of administration is injection into the muscle (or IM).

    Although many people notice an effect rather immediately after one injection, some patients will not notice an effect until a cumulative threshold has been reached, after twice weekly injections for a period of five to six weeks. The dose may also need to be adjusted. Sometimes, a dose of 1,000 mcg per injection is adequate. In other cases, doses as high as 5,000 mcg are required. These preparations generally need to be manufactured by a compounding pharmacy with the appropriate facilities to prepare sterile injections.


    In general, side effects are low. There is no known toxicity from vitamin B12 overdose. Occasionally, some people may notice discomfort at the site of injection or a mild erythematous rash. You should advise the nurse of that reaction, if it occurs. On rare occasions, it causes some agitation and feelings of "hyperness," similar to those experienced after drinking a caffeinated beverage. If that occurs, the dose should be reduced or the therapy may need to be discontinued.

    In general, most of my patients who have tried this therapy, in conjunction with a rational medical evaluation of their co-existing problems, have done very well.

    Dale Guyer, M.D.


    Susan/Calif
  2. 2BPainfree

    2BPainfree New Member

    I just found this site which is one of "many" regarding B12
    Injections....not to push the subject, but hey...if there's something, anything that can help this fatigue...it's worth looking at! (BTW: I thought it was interesting my description of a "Feeling of well being" is the same one they used in this article!)

    Here goes:
    Vitamin B12 Injections (Hydroxocobalamin)

    Vitamin B12 injections have been used for a long time in the treatment of various problems in medicine, especially related to chronic fatigue states. However, in the past, there were few well-controlled trials looking at the efficacy of vitamin B12 injections, especially in the company of normal serum vitamin B12 levels. More recently, the use of vitamin B12 injections has been subjected to good clinical trials and shown to be very efficacious.

    In general, what one might expect from vitamin B12 is an improved sense of well being, a lifting of depression and improved sleep patterns. Many people report very colorful dreams. Fatigue is generally improved. People feel motivated to undertake many activities that they would not previously have been able to tolerate. The usual route of administration is injection into the muscle (or IM).

    Although many people notice an effect rather immediately after one injection, some patients will not notice an effect until a cumulative threshold has been reached, after twice weekly injections for a period of five to six weeks. The dose may also need to be adjusted. Sometimes, a dose of 1,000 mcg per injection is adequate. In other cases, doses as high as 5,000 mcg are required. These preparations generally need to be manufactured by a compounding pharmacy with the appropriate facilities to prepare sterile injections.


    In general, side effects are low. There is no known toxicity from vitamin B12 overdose. Occasionally, some people may notice discomfort at the site of injection or a mild erythematous rash. You should advise the nurse of that reaction, if it occurs. On rare occasions, it causes some agitation and feelings of "hyperness," similar to those experienced after drinking a caffeinated beverage. If that occurs, the dose should be reduced or the therapy may need to be discontinued.

    In general, most of my patients who have tried this therapy, in conjunction with a rational medical evaluation of their co-existing problems, have done very well.

    Dale Guyer, M.D.


    Susan/Calif
  3. AnnG

    AnnG New Member

    B12 shots were the first thing my Dr. tried. Learning to give myself the shots was a real pain! But, thankfully they didn't help at all and I could quit "shooting" myself. The Dr. said they only seemed to help about 50% of his patients.