Balletdancer74..anyone..on Aloe Vera

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by foggygirl, Feb 10, 2007.

  1. foggygirl

    foggygirl New Member

    Balletdancer74--I read in your juicing post that you put Aloe Vera into your juicer mix. Is that the same plant that so many of us use for burns, dry skin etc.? Do you just toss a stem in or do you skin it first..?? How much do you use?

    I searched the web for info on this plant and it is used internally but in extract form. Years ago my daughter squeezed out about a pint of the juice from it for a sunburn treatment, my dog accidentally drank it--it made her coat beautiful and shinny..BUT..it made her severely constipated. How much is a safe amount?

    Thanks,

    Foggygirl
  2. balletdancer74

    balletdancer74 New Member

    Hi Foggy Girl,

    I buy organic aloe vera "juice" (no sugar) which I just add into my homemade juice. I don't really measure how much I put in, but I find that it soothes my stomach. I'd say I put in about 1 tablespoon per 8 oz of juice that I make.

    I haven't noticed constipation, but I also have IBS, so who knows! lol

    Hopefully, someone else will have more information.

    Warmly,
    LB32 (Leeza)
  3. Slayadragon

    Slayadragon New Member

    I did colonic hydrotherapy several times, and the therapist told me that aloe actually relieved constipation. She was pretty colon-obsessed, and so I tend to think she knew what she was talking about.

    I bought some in liquid form and have had it on occasion since. I've been doing other things to relieve constipation since then and so am not sure what if any effect it's had on me.

    Best, Lisa

  4. foggygirl

    foggygirl New Member

    Thanks for your responses.

    I have this huge Aloe plant so it seems foolish to me to buy it when I already have it, and I also know there are no additives in it, but am hesitant to just consume it w/o knowing more. I was hoping someone made their own and could tell me how and quantities.

    I've done some research on it but so far have only found places to buy it from.

    Thanks again.

    Foggygirl
  5. TwinMa

    TwinMa New Member

    But I buy it from the store. I drink 1 tablespoon along with 1 tablespoon of lemon juice mixed in with about 4 oz of water. The brand I use is Lily of the Desert.

    Sorry I can't help with using it from the plant. I've never done that. I looked in my juicing book, and there was no information on aloe vera plant.
  6. suzetal

    suzetal New Member

    Aloe Aloe barbadensis,Aloe vera
    Common Names :

    Traditional Healing Uses ** Abrasions/Cuts/Bleeding * Acne * Burns * Gingivitis * Insect Bites/Rashes * Mature or troubled skin *

    Aloes was employed by the ancients and was known to the Greeks as early as the forth century B.C. Uses by Dioscorides, Celsus and Pliny. The leaf juices have important medicinal uses, making aloe one of the most respected medicinal plants.

    Modern researchers have identified several reasons why aloe gel spurs wound healing: It has antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral compounds that help prevent wound infections.

    It also has immune-stimulating and anti-inflammatory compounds, and it stimulates collagen synthesis and skin regeneration. Aloe contains vitamins C and E, plus the mineral zinc.

    It looks like a catus, but is acually a member of the lily family. A tender tropical, native to Africa, you can grow aloe as a houseplant, in fact is it wise to do so. Not only does an aloe plant provide quick relief from a burn or scald, the potted plants have been shown to remove formaldehyde from tainted indoor air


    Health Benefits **Analgesic *Emollient *Anti-inflammatory *Antiseptic *Fights fungus infection *Combats Viruses *
    Remedies using Aloe
    Gotu Kola Aloe burn gel *


    References
    Aloe is soothing, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial - helps heal wounds of all kinds. Buy only the pure gel and use topically as needed Linda B. White, M.D.


    Commercial aloe skin care products (containing stabilized aloe) rarely, if ever, pack the thearapeutic punch of fresh aloe.. avoid them James Duke

    Quick Tips
    The thick juice from a broken leaf of Aloe may be rubbed on the skin as a beauty treatment to nourish the skin and diminsh wrinkles. Wash the face with hot water and vinegar, then rub on the Aloe and allow to remain on skin all night.


    As soon as you suffer a burn, break or cut off an outer leaf of an Aloe plant, split it open with your fingernails, and squeeze the leaf gel onto the burn
    Use pure aloe vera gel to quell the sting of herpes lesions.

    Astrology, from Culpeper's Complete Herbal:
    It is a martial plant, hot in the second degree, and dry in the third; of a very bitter taste;

    the juice being refined and clarified from its dross, is of a clear and blackish clean brown colour:

    it opens the belly, and purges cold, phlegmatic, and choleric humours which overburden and hurt the stomach:

    it is the basis in almost all pills and comforts, cleanses and dries up all superfluous humours.
    Folklore
    It is said one of the reasons Alexander the Great invaded the Scocotra Islands was to provide Cleopatra with Aloe

    Sue
  7. foggygirl

    foggygirl New Member

    Thanks so much for your very useful information.

    Foggygirl
  8. suzetal

    suzetal New Member

    The fleshy leaves of the true Aloe contain near the epidermis or outer skin, a row of fibrovascular bundles, the cells of which are much enlarged and filled with a yellow juice which exudes when the leaf is cut. When it is desired to collect the juice, the leaves are cut off close to the stem and so placed that the juice is drained off into tubs. This juice thus collected is concentrated either by spontaneous evaporation, or more generally by boiling until it becomes of the consistency of thick honey. On cooling, it is then poured into gourds, boxes, or other convenient receptacles, and solidifies.

    Aloes require two or three years' standing before they yield their juice. In the West Indian Aloe plantations they are set out in rows like cabbages and cutting takes place in March or April, but in Africa the drug is collected from the wild plants.

    Sue
    Hope I was some help .
  9. foggygirl

    foggygirl New Member

    That's exactly some of what I was looking for. Thanks for all your time and effort.

    Foggygirl
  10. suzetal

    suzetal New Member

    Were all in the same boat and I am glad when I find something to help a fellow sufferer and also a member of my family.

    I consider everyone here a member of my extended family.

    Hugs
    Sue