Be prepared

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by SharonR, Nov 2, 2002.

  1. SharonR

    SharonR New Member

    From the BBC
    These little buggers ride in first class, coach, they don't care, of any airplane. So they might have well said "Global".
    Excert (Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen)
    This may be telling us to go out and vote here in the states.

    Government+control+greed+experimentation=disease.










    EDITIONS
    Change to UK

    Saturday, 2 November, 2002, 00:04 GMT
    Killer flu 'on the way'


    A gene shift could make flu more powerful

    Experts say governments across Europe need to plan for a virulent flu outbreak that could claim hundreds of thousands of lives.
    Although the last two winters have brought only mild strains of flu to the UK, the viruses are constantly mutating and scientists say it is only a matter of time before a powerful strain emerges.



    Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen

    Professor Albert Osterhaus, Erasmus University
    While it may not be as damaging as the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed tens of millions in Europe alone, they say that the continent is not ready to cope with another pandemic.

    This "superflu" is caused by an influenza virus, but its fatality rate is more reminiscent of lethal haemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

    Previous versions, including the Spanish flu, had mutated into a form which the human immune system could not tackle.

    It is possible that, at any time, the virus could mutate again and produce a strain that could share many of these lethal genetic characteristics.

    Strategies

    Virologists from throughout Europe are meeting in Malta this week to discuss the best strategy for first predicting, and then handling a major outbreak.

    Albert Osterhaus, a professor of virology at Erasmus Univeristy in Rotterdam, said: "Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen."



    European citizens will expect everything possible to have been done at every level of public authority

    Robert Coleman, European Commission
    Some experts have been looking at the genetic structure of the virus which caused the 1918 pandemic, as well as a serious outbreak in Hong Kong in 1997 for clues which may help doctors combat such an outbreak.

    There were three flu pandemics in the last century, in 1918, 1957 and 1968.

    Even though the 1957 and 1968 outbreaks were less severe than the Spanish flu, they still accounted for 40m deaths between them.

    Overdue attack

    Researchers suggest that an approximate 30 year cycle between pandemics means we are well overdue for another one.

    Robert Coleman, the director general of health and consumer protection at the European Commission, said: "The action we take now will determine how well we combat the next major influenza threat we will face.

    "European citizens will expect everything possible to have been done at every level of public authority.

    "It will be several months at least after the start of the pandemic before a vaccine is available.

    "Antiviral drugs could help during this period, but stockpiles would need to be in place well in advance. This is not yet the case."






  2. SharonR

    SharonR New Member

    From the BBC
    These little buggers ride in first class, coach, they don't care, of any airplane. So they might have well said "Global".
    Excert (Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen)
    This may be telling us to go out and vote here in the states.

    Government+control+greed+experimentation=disease.










    EDITIONS
    Change to UK

    Saturday, 2 November, 2002, 00:04 GMT
    Killer flu 'on the way'


    A gene shift could make flu more powerful

    Experts say governments across Europe need to plan for a virulent flu outbreak that could claim hundreds of thousands of lives.
    Although the last two winters have brought only mild strains of flu to the UK, the viruses are constantly mutating and scientists say it is only a matter of time before a powerful strain emerges.



    Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen

    Professor Albert Osterhaus, Erasmus University
    While it may not be as damaging as the 1918 "Spanish flu" that killed tens of millions in Europe alone, they say that the continent is not ready to cope with another pandemic.

    This "superflu" is caused by an influenza virus, but its fatality rate is more reminiscent of lethal haemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola.

    Previous versions, including the Spanish flu, had mutated into a form which the human immune system could not tackle.

    It is possible that, at any time, the virus could mutate again and produce a strain that could share many of these lethal genetic characteristics.

    Strategies

    Virologists from throughout Europe are meeting in Malta this week to discuss the best strategy for first predicting, and then handling a major outbreak.

    Albert Osterhaus, a professor of virology at Erasmus Univeristy in Rotterdam, said: "Whatever knowledge, technology and skills we develop, eventually it's the policy makers and the politicians that decide what is going to happen."



    European citizens will expect everything possible to have been done at every level of public authority

    Robert Coleman, European Commission
    Some experts have been looking at the genetic structure of the virus which caused the 1918 pandemic, as well as a serious outbreak in Hong Kong in 1997 for clues which may help doctors combat such an outbreak.

    There were three flu pandemics in the last century, in 1918, 1957 and 1968.

    Even though the 1957 and 1968 outbreaks were less severe than the Spanish flu, they still accounted for 40m deaths between them.

    Overdue attack

    Researchers suggest that an approximate 30 year cycle between pandemics means we are well overdue for another one.

    Robert Coleman, the director general of health and consumer protection at the European Commission, said: "The action we take now will determine how well we combat the next major influenza threat we will face.

    "European citizens will expect everything possible to have been done at every level of public authority.

    "It will be several months at least after the start of the pandemic before a vaccine is available.

    "Antiviral drugs could help during this period, but stockpiles would need to be in place well in advance. This is not yet the case."






  3. Cactuslil

    Cactuslil New Member

    I have a doc appt. Tues. to begin the paperwork to get approval on my oral surgery; plan to get my and my son's flu shot. I had the 57' flu while a child and was delirious through most of it; surely don't want to catch the flu so either way, if you believe the govt. is going to spread a "bugger" via the flu shot or if we are to catch a strain of something by exposure; the risk is still a risk but one, with the immunization, that I will chance. CactusLil'
  4. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    This is another good reason to use colloidal silver. It fights bacteria, viruses, and fungi. There is a theory that the royal houses survived the plague in Europe because they ate off of silver plates and utinsels.

    Love, Mikie
  5. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    Yes, it would be wise to stock up on meds and supplements, even the OTC stuff would make good sense too.

    Oil of Oregano has keep me free from the flu bugs for the last three years, I just put it under my nose when I go out in public, plus I carry those little alcohol whipes and whenever I use a menu I wipe my hands, and after shopping I wipe my hands too. It seems to work for me. Plus I take extra vitamin C during the flu season.

    Thanks for the article, I did not read it all, but will print it out for later to read.


    Shalom, Shirl
  6. missvickielynn

    missvickielynn New Member

    I am totally no good at math, but I understand your equation, and agree completely!

    "Government+control+greed+experimentation=disease."

    Don't get me started.........

    If "they" don't kill us with genetically engineered disease, or chemtrails, or HAARP, or God knows what else, then they will use the mass media to help them instill enough "terror" to kill us all!

    I have learned enough about this "subject" in the last 2 years (even more since 9-11) that I no longer believe voting is any more effective than arguing with your relatives (or anyone else who doesn't want to be confused with any facts) about whether or not CFS/FMS, etc, are "real" illnesses.

    Makes a person feel pretty helpless.....which is, of course, what "terrorism" is all about.

    This is not the world I thought I would live to see.

    God Help Us!



    [This Message was Edited on 11/03/2002]
  7. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Our govt has done so many horriffic things to us, it is just sickening. I see now on the CDC site they want to experiment with our children to see what exactly is the correct dilution amount on the new smallpox vaccine, they had some left over from back when they used to use it all the time and they are unsure of the right amount. Nice.

    They created mycoplasma. The CDC will tell you lyme disease is rarely ever heard of. Fibro is of no interest to them.

    The chemtrails contain chemicals that worsen our immune system and coat our longs with a film that makes us more susceptible to flu & pneumonia.

    But, I see lately where Ashcroft did say that they have no plans to do any experimentation with our troops this time when we go to was like they always have done in the past with the military. We don't have to worry about it anymore, they are not doing it now.

    Jaci