Before I slip into unconscieousness, I'd like to share...

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by makezmuzic, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. makezmuzic

    makezmuzic New Member

    I am having a fibro and costochondritis flare from hades!!!! And it all stems from constipation. Being so impacted I dry heaved and hurled for hours. I feel like I have been hit by a car. Te pain meds finally plugged me up to the point of ending up in the ER!!!! I had been feeling toxic for days. Was scared it might be constipation.

    Its the end of the month and I don't have anything healthy in the house to eat. I ran out of stuff to make my usual smoothie daily smoothie of cherry and prune juice, pears, apples, chlorophyll, aloe vera and flax seeds. I made the mistake of eating a quesadilla two days in a row. NEVER AGAIN!!! I am officially down for the count!!!!

    The eyes may be the window to the soul, but the bowels RULE!!!!!!!!!!
  2. Catseye

    Catseye Member

    I didn't have the same, but the opposite when I ate some tofu with spices like chinese green curry the other day. I should have known better. I think the quesadilla would almost be worth it, though. My diet is so restricted, it's boring but it's habit now.

    Maybe we should all get together and make a video of our symptoms and episodes like these. Johnny Knoxville made a killing with his jackass stuff. We could call ours "The Joys of Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia" or "Damn It, I Ate the Wrong Thing Again and Now I'm Going To Have a Volcanic Bowel Movement".

    Wait, it's the holidays:

    Deck the Halls With Pills
    Hark the Herald Angels Crash
    Do You Fear What I Fear
    Oh Come All Ye Painful
    The Twelve Days of Quesadilla
    Oh Christmas Knee
    Santa Claus Is Coming Down with FM
    We Three Kings of Insomnia
    I'm Dreaming of a White . . . I Forgot!

    Sorry, I got too silly. Just trying to cheer you up, being out of prune juice and cherries and all. karen
  3. abcanada

    abcanada New Member

    Just something I learned after the birth of my last baby when I found myself in a very similar situation. Everything failed and I was to the point of going to the ER too. I tried a glycerin supository. It worked wonders!!! didn't think it would, but it did. Worth a try unless they gave you some better ideas at the ER. Hope things are better now. Laura
  4. Gly

    Gly New Member

    When I was in the hospital in April, they gave me a stool softener capsule (Ducosate sodium) with every second Emtec 30 pill. Emtec 30 is Tylenol 3 without the caffeine. Now I don't know how I ever lived without the stool softeners! And I don't know why my doctor didn't tell me about them. They are available OTC.

    Things I tried which didn't work well enough:
    prune juice
    Senakot
    lactulose (It worked but gave me excruciating cramps)
    glycerin suppositories
    more fibre and more water
    Metamucil
    Benafiber

    Codeine and morphine suck the water right out of your bowel, it seems.
  5. elliespad

    elliespad Member

    I don't suffer with constipation so maybe not qualified to comment, but MAganesium pulls water in the bowels, so maybe keeping regular with Magnesium would counteract the effects of the pain meds, which pull water out of the bowels.
  6. victoria

    victoria New Member

    I'd never heard of the pain meds doing that as a side effect until it happened to me.

    It was after being in a car accident a couple of years ago... was taking oxycodone for only about 6 or 7 days due to broken arm and dislocated wrist etc, but was using the bathroom every day and seemed okay... And, I repeat, I honestly had NO warning;

    Until -- my gut suddenly spasmed to the point I was on the floor within minutes of it starting. There was no possibility of using a suppository at that point.

    I couldn't get up off the floor, I couldn't even open my eyes, felt like my total body was spasmed, I was curled up in a fetal position in dire pain. DH had to call an ambulance! TALK about emBARASSing (always did wonder where that word came from lol) . . .

    Enema is finally what worked, but only after morphine did the trick to relieve the pain from spasming, & that is one experience I hope to never repeat.

    On the other hand, my DH took oxycodone once for 14 days straight for "dry-socket" and NEVER had a problem... lucky guy.

    al the best,
    Victoria




    [This Message was Edited on 12/03/2006]
  7. victoria

    victoria New Member

    it might be good to rename your post so more people who are taking pain meds will read this... maybe something like 'pain meds & constipation"?

    best,
    Victoria
  8. abcanada

    abcanada New Member

    My young daughter also has chronic constipation if not always on top of things. my nurse mother gave me a bottle of senna with stool softener tablets. They were from a natural health food store. All natural, but they also do wonders for her, and she gets severely bound up. Good Luck, Laura.
  9. PVLady

    PVLady New Member

    Please ask your doctor about a new drug called Amitiza. It is for chronic idiopathic constipation. I also have severe problems and started Amitiza a few days ago. I completely understand what you are going through.

    I have big hopes this drug will change my life for the better. So far it is helping. I have had no bad side effects at all.

    It is not a laxative. See Info I below I found on internet.. (Some info below may be repeated).


    Amitiza

    Let’s take a look at how your digestive system works to understand how AMITIZA works.

    The food you eat is broken down into small molecules so that the body can use it to nourish your cells and to produce energy. Nutrients from the food you eat are absorbed by your intestines and transported through your body. What remains is mostly waste and fluid. It’s your colon’s job to take care of expelling this waste and fluid.

    Your colon does this by both releasing and absorbing fluid as stool is pushed through the bowel. That way, waste is formed, but is soft enough to expel.

    The form of stool—whether it’s hard or soft—is determined, in part, by the pace that stool moves through the colon.

    If the muscle contractions are slow, stool is left hard and dry, so it’s difficult for your bowel to expel. That’s a form of constipation.

    AMITIZA treats chronic idiopathic constipation by increasing fluid secretions locally in the small intestine, helping stool to pass more easily.

    AMITIZA can offer predictable relief*
    Most people take regular bowel function for granted. But how regular may be different for everyone. For some, having a bowel movement 3 days a week is normal. And for others, 3 times a day is normal.

    According to the American College of Gastroenterology, chronic constipation includes having fewer than 3 bowel movements a week. AMITIZA may help patients to improve bowel function. You may average 5 to 6 bowel movements a week after taking AMITIZA.†

    And here’s a fact. The majority of people had a bowel movement the first day of treatment with AMITIZA.‡

    The relief you deserve
    Where’s the relief? You know your own body. If you are constipated, you may experience a range of symptoms—hard stools and straining to name just a few. Or you may feel your life revolves around your constipation. You might change your schedule based on available bathrooms, or just because you feel poorly.

    AMITIZA is a small, oral gel cap that you take twice a day with food, or as directed by your doctor. It is approved for adults with chronic idiopathic constipation including those over 65.

    Your doctor will determine how long you should continue taking AMITIZA. Take it as directed, and you may experience predictable relief.*

    *In clinical studies, relief was defined as having 3 or more bowel movements per week after taking AMITIZA.
    †In clinical studies, patients on placebo had an average of 2 to 3 bowel movements per week. Patients taking AMITIZA had an average of 5 to 6 bowel movements per week.
    ‡In clinical studies.

    Patients' medical needs shouldn't suffer due to their financial situation. At Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. we're committed to providing access for patients who are most in need. Here are the Eligibility Requirements:
    You must meet financial eligibility criteria based on the Federal Poverty Guidelines published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
    You do not have medical insurance coverage for prescriptions and/or are ineligible for government (e.g., Medicaid) or private programs that cover the cost of prescription pharmaceuticals.
    You are a legal resident of the United States.
    Ask your doctor for more information, or visit Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc. at http://www.tpna.com or 1-877-AMITIZA.

    In clinical studies, relief was defined as having 3 or more bowel movements per week after taking AMITIZA.

    Periodic or occasional constipation is usually not serious. However, chronic constipation means that for 3 months or more you have had infrequent bowel movements or difficulty in passing stools. “Idiopathic” means the cause of the constipation is not known and not due to underlying illness or medication.

    AMITIZA treats chronic idiopathic constipation by increasing fluid secretions locally in the small intestine, helping stool to pass more easily.

    Now here’s how bowel movements typically happen. Nutrients from the food you eat are absorbed by your intestines and transported through your body. What remains is mostly waste and fluid. It’s your colon’s job to take care of expelling this waste and fluid.

    Your colon does this by both releasing and absorbing fluid as stool is pushed through the bowel. That way, waste is formed, but is soft enough to expel.

    The form of stool—whether it’s hard or soft—is in part, determined by the pace at which stool moves through the colon.

    If the muscle contractions are slow, stool is left hard and dry. And it’s difficult for your bowel to expel. That’s a form of constipation.

    Key symptoms
    According to the American College of Gastroenterology, if you suffered from any two of these symptoms for 3 months over the last year, you may have chronic constipation:
    Fewer than 3 bowel movements a week
    Difficulty passing stools
    Straining
    Hard or lumpy stools
    Abdominal discomfort and bloating
    Feeling like your bowel is never completely empty
    Feeling like there is something blocking your bowel
    Manual maneuvering to stimulate the bowel
    If you suffer from chronic constipation, you may feel frustrated. You’re not alone. That’s important to know.

    In clinical studies, relief was defined as having 3 or more bowel movements per week after taking AMITIZA.
    '
    It can be hard for some people to talk about chronic idiopathic constipation. But it's the first step to getting the relief you need. You may not want to talk about it. It's a personal condition. As a result, a lot of people delay seeking help.

    People may not realize chronic idiopathic constipation is a medical condition. And they suffer in silence. They cancel plans, miss work, and just start scheduling their lives around it. The truth is that when you have chronic idiopathic constipation, it's likely you may need prescription treatment. And it is available.


    Talking points
    Here are some things to remember:
    Be frank and honest with your doctor
    You know your own symptoms
    Only you can describe what you feel
    Talking about it can mean you get the treatment you need
    There are treatments that may be new to you
    Ask your doctor about AMITIZA. It could be right for you.

    *In clinical studies, relief was defined as having 3 or more bowel movements per week after taking AMITIZA.

    AMITIZA is indicated for the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation in the adult population. "Idiopathic" means the cause of the constipation is unknown and not due to an underlying illness or medication.


    AMITIZA is not for everyone. Do not take AMITIZA if you have a history of or have ever had a bowel obstruction; you are allergic to AMITIZA or to any of its ingredients; or you have severe diarrhea.

    AMITIZA has not been studied in pregnant women and should only be used during a pregnancy if the potential benefits justify the potential risk to the fetus. Women should have a negative pregnancy test before beginning treatment with AMITIZA and need to practice effective contraceptive measures. If you are pregnant or become pregnant while being treated with AMITIZA, talk to your doctor to evaluate the risks.

    The most common side effects reported by people taking AMITIZA were nausea, diarrhea, and headache. If your diarrhea becomes severe, stop taking AMITIZA immediately and tell your doctor. Tell your doctor if you experience nausea or diarrhea or any other side effects associated with AMITIZA. Your doctor or pharmacist can provide you with a more complete list of possible side effects.


    [This Message was Edited on 12/03/2006]
  10. makezmuzic

    makezmuzic New Member

    Thank you Prickels, gotta keep laughing.

    Karen!!!! Akkkkk!! Thank you friend, that is so what I needed. I think we have a shot on MTV - "Spin the wheel" what food will send me over the edge tonight. Land on Chile Rejenos and if you dare partake we get to video tape you in the potty!!! How about, On the first day of fibro my MD gave to me....(the Charly Brown Chorus sings - Medication time is here, favorite time of year....LOL!!

    Thank you Laura, I'll pick up some supositories, but I don't know. I was in no condition to put anything up me, I was searching the house to find something to pull stuff OUT of me!!! WAaaaa!!! I'll have to up my intake of stool softener for sure. I could have built the Rock of Guibraller (sp) with what came out of me.

    Hi Gly, I use stool softeners, usually have my smoothie of cheey juice, aloe vera, flax seed, pears and apples. Drink lots of water and prune juice. It just slipped up on me this time. I know the signals though now, the dizzyness, cold sweats. I think some of the abdominal pain is due to them raising my level on my CPAP machine and its forcing way to much air into my stomach. I think I really have to stay on top of it though. I'm on only 15 mgs methadone for fibro & costo. Vicadine for backup, but only use it 1 or 2 times a week.

    Ellispad, please speak more to magni. pulling H2o in the bowels? I just started taking calcium for leg cramps. I could swear I felt moisture being sucked out of my mouth , lips and tounge during this. When I tossed my "cookies" it was almost dry cottage cheese - no liquid at all. I was very dehydrated even though I drank 2 big jugs of water that a.m.??

    I hope neither on of us every has a repeat of that Victoria. I was so embarassed, 4 of the finest looking firemen in the world and they meet me on the throne!!! I'll repost this and include my use of methedone. thanks

    Wow, PV lady, thank you for all the important info. I will talk to my MD, it sounds like I indeed have chronic constipation. I'm impressed with the maker of Amitza's commitment to keep it accessable to all.

    Thank you all again.

    MM





  11. charlie21

    charlie21 New Member

    Have you thought about taking a cod liver oil capsule each day, that will help to loosen you up. Charlie
  12. Gly

    Gly New Member

    Magnesium is a MUST if you take calcium. The dose is half of what your calcium dose is. I take 1200 mg. of calcium a day and 600 mg. of magnesium. Both are the citrate form. I take the magnesium capsules all at once at night. Shirl posted several times about that, if you're interested in why. If I ever run out of magnesium I will not take the calcium until I get more. I forgot to add magnesium to my list as it's part of my daily supplements.

    I've never used methadone. For 10 mg. of oxycontin I need at least 2 stool softeners and a laxative (Senna) so I try to keep those for emergencies, like trips out of town. And this is in addition to fibre, water, magnesium and prunes.
  13. victoria

    victoria New Member

    I second that motion about not ever having that happen again!

    You know, lol, I never even actually SAW whoever took me to the ER.... as my eyes were shut in pain; probably just as well, not sure I'd wanna know! This way if I see them on the street or when we've had to call them for my inlaws, I don't have to think about it and face whoever was on duty that morning!!!

    LOL,
    Victoria

  14. joyfully

    joyfully New Member

    Codeine is the worst for me. My doctor told me that it is MANDATORY to do lots of walking and drinking huge volumes of water if you take medications with codeine in them.

    Unfortunately, I use an electric mobility scooter , so the walking part is out!

    We are darned if we don't and darned if we do!