Blue M&M's help with spinal cord and inflammation/this is a riot

Discussion in 'General Health & Wellness' started by daylight, Jul 31, 2009.

  1. daylight

    daylight New Member

    I just was sent this article and I'm not sure if this is true or not,but it's sound cool to me.lol
    http://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20090729/blue-dye-mms-helps-spinal-cord-injuries?ecd=wnl_rhu_073109

    God knows I love m&m's but can't afford to eat them . So know we have a legit excuse for eating candy. This is a riot.
  2. rockgor

    rockgor Well-Known Member

    I read about this in the TMJ.*

    All of the patients in the study were smurfs.

    *Toontown Medical Journal.

    Thanks for posting.

    Rock
  3. daylight

    daylight New Member

    To to funny. It did sound pretty fishy to me but heck I love m&m's. Just wish that gummy bears had some medicinal properties to them. =)
  4. TwoCatDoctors

    TwoCatDoctors New Member

    [ACTUALLY THE COMPOUND IS SIMILAR TO THE BLUE DYE FOUND IN M&Ms SO EVERYONE IS RUNNING AROUND LAUGHING SAYING BLUE M&Ms CURING SPINAL INJURIES. BLUE M&Ms WON'T CURE ANYTHING EXCEPT A HUNGER FOR CHOCOLATE. BUT AS ONE WHO IS MOBILITY DISABLED IN AN ELECTRIC SCOOTER, THIS COMPOUND MAY HOLD HOPE FOR SPINAL INJURIES. THIS WILL BE PRESENTED AT OUR LOCAL DISABLED SUPPORT GROUP AT THE AUGUST MEETING AS SOME THERE ARE PARALYZED DUE TO SPINAL CORD INJURIES. AND NO, WE WON'T BE EATING M&Ms.]


    Blue Dye in M&Ms Helps Spinal Cord Injuries?
    Compound Similar to Food Dye May Help People With Spinal Injuries Regain Movement
    By Bill Hendrick
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

    July 29, 2009 -- A compound that's similar to the blue food dye in Gatorade and M&Ms may hold promise for people with spinal cord injuries, new research says.

    The compound, called Brilliant Blue G, blocks the cascade of events that leads to inflammation following a traumatic injury of the spinal cord, researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center report in a study involving rats.

    Inflammation often causes more irreversible damage than the initial trauma, but this secondary damage, considered inevitable, may one day be preventable, the scientists say in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Blue Dye Prevents Inflammation

    After researchers led by Maiken Nedergaard, MD, director of neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, injected Brilliant Blue G into rats with spinal cord injuries, the rodents showed improved mobility and even hobbled about. They also temporarily turned blue.

    Injured rats that were not given a dose of the blue dye didn’t walk at all.

    The results of the study build on research by Nedergaard that was published in 2004 in the journal Nature Medicine.

    That study showed that a substance called ATP, the energy source that keeps cells alive, runs out of control at the site of a spinal cord injury, activating a molecule known to cause inflammation and kill spinal neuron cells.

    For these neurons, inflammation often causes more damage than the initial trauma to the spine, meaning that for treatment to work it must be administered immediately after the spinal cord injury.

    Brilliant Blue G blocks ATP from flooding the spinal injury and triggering inflammation, the researchers say.

    The authors say there is no effective way to “treat acute spinal cord injury, apart from the use of steroids, which provide at best modest protection to a subset of patients.”

    Nedergaard says that although her research offers a promising new possible approach to treating spinal cord injuries, more research is needed.

    FROM: http://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20090729/blue-dye-mms-helps-spinal-cord-injuries?ecd=wnl_day_080109
    [This Message was Edited on 08/01/2009]
  5. daylight

    daylight New Member

    This is interesting . Keep me informed on what you can find out. My spine is pretty bad but I still can walk a feet at a time,just can't keep standing for very long. The ostepprosis and RA in my spine was triggered by a car accident I was in in the mid 90's . The accident left me with multiple inter vertabra fractures and now stenosis ,S-curve scoliosis,mild paraplegia in legs (mostly right leg) . So hopefully this will be a good thing . But I'm still gonna eat those m&m's . =)
  6. TwoCatDoctors

    TwoCatDoctors New Member

    Our local disabled support group is sponsored by the State Spinal Cord Injury Association, so we discuss all sorts of news on spinal cords, or any disabled news. One meeting our leader even had the manufacturer's salesman come out and demonstrate the device placed near the knee for those that have the "drop foot" syndrome. The device appears to be digital and actually causes the nerves to lift up the foot so people with "drop foot" that couldn't walk before, can now walk so well on their own. It was AMAZING to see that device in action and I thrive on seeing this technology that can help all of us.

    Unfortunately for all of us that have injuries already, the dye that was mentioned in the article involving spinal cord injuries will not help us--it needs to be injected into fresh injuries in order to help with the inflammation. So you, me and many others won't see the benefit of this. But I carry so much hope that in my lifetime we'll see research breakthroughs that might completely cure spinal cord injuries so that you and I might walk and even RUN AGAIN (and I could dump this scooter) during our lifetime.

    I personally love all these fantastic colors that the M&Ms are being made out of. It's incredible and I love it. I can't eat them though, as I developed an allergy in the last few years to chocolate (oh, I used to LOVE chocolate). Take care and hugs.