Book on out of sync day/night cyles

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by tansy, Aug 24, 2003.

  1. tansy

    tansy New Member

    THE CIRCADIAN PRESCRIPTION is written by Dr Sidney M Baker and it explains how we can use eating patterms to influence our circadian cycles. His explanations are based upon the belief we should
    Breakfast like a king
    Lunch like a lord
    Dine like a pauper

    He explains why we need proteins/amino acids early in our day and complex carbs late at night.

    It also explains the roles of light sources and melatonin.

    This synopsis gives a lot of useful info and explanations, definitely one to save and read at your leisure.

    THE CIRCADIAN PRESCRIPTION

    For alertness and daytime activities our bodies need protein, properly broken down into appropriate amino acids. On the other hand, for energy during sleep in order to repair our tissues and to detoxify and eliminate the wastes from our metabolism, we do need some carbohydrate. NOHA Honorary Member Sidney M. Baker, MD, explains that usually in our culture people eat concentrated starches and sugars (carbohydrates) for breakfast and lunch, saving their main consumption of protein for dinner in the evening. These daily actions result in timing that is exactly opposite to our requirements for excellent functioning and health.

    . . . people eat concentrated starches and sugars (carbohydrates) for breakfast and lunch, saving their main consumption of protein for dinner in the evening. These daily actions result in timing that is exactly opposite to our requirements for excellent functioning and health.

    In The Circadian Prescription * Dr. Baker explains vividly that although each person is an individual and different from everybody else, we are all subject to the rhythms of nature. We all live on the same planet! Over the millennia life has developed within the daily cycle of light in the daytime and darkness at night. Also, in northern climates, we have the seasonal cycles with longer days in the summer and much darkness and cold in the winter. In the daytime our ancestors would hunt eagerly for fish and game plus some plants to give themselves the nourishment for excellent physique and development. They got the long-chain essential fatty acids, especially from seafood, so that our wonderful human brains could develop. (See NOHA NEWS, Fall 1991, "Food, the Driving Force of Evolution"). The excellent protein in the diets of our paleolithic ancestors allowed them to grow tall in contrast to the shorter stature from the relative lack of protein when people had to resort to agriculture. (See NOHA NEWS, Fall 1986, "The Fish and Game Diet," with reference to "Paleolithic Nutrition, A Consideration of Its Nature and Current Implications.")

    If [our paleolithic ancestors'] bodies could produce enough insulin, which is needed to turn carbohydrate into fat, they would all have that extra fat and a better chance of surviving, when at some other season, food could not be found.

    In describing our ancient ancestors and how they searched and found a wonderful variety of food, Dr. Baker points out that, once in a while and also only at certain seasons, one of them would find fruit and eat it and probably give some to the family. Then, this fine source of carbohydrate would be extra. If their bodies could produce enough insulin, which is needed to turn carbohydrate into fat, they would all have that extra fat and a better chance of surviving, when at some other season, food could not be found. Thus, this ability to increase one’s insulin and store fat gave our ancestors an excellent evolutionary advantage when food was sometimes scarce and they needed storage fat in their bodies. However, in our present situation we can eat sugar and starch day and night and we are endlessly turning the carbohydrate into fat, which we don’t need and which makes a dangerously large number of us obese and subject to many of the chronic, devastating diseases of the western world.

    In addition to disrupting our seasonal cycle by eating the fruits of autumn and turning them into storage fats all year round, we have also, by the use of artificial lighting, often completely eliminated the nighttime darkness, which our ancestors experienced and to which our bodies are attuned.

    In addition to disrupting our seasonal cycle by eating the fruits of autumn and turning them into storage fats all year round, we have also, by the use of artificial lighting, often completely eliminated the nighttime darkness, which our ancestors experienced and to which our bodies are attuned. Dr. Baker explains that our bodies do have many circadian rhythms: waves that repeat almost exactly over each day and night.
    In his chapter "Life Is Rhythm," he cites 24-hour fluctuations in bodily temperature, levels of certain hormones, occurrence of accidents, and even ability to detoxify alcohol.

    . . . "protein provides the platform for the daytime chemistry of consciousness and action."

    Melatonin is a vital hormone, which helps with sleep and which has been proposed to have anti-cancer effects. Its production from the pineal gland peaks in the middle of the night and this peak production can be eliminated if we are exposed to ANY light. "Failure to have a peak release of melatonin at night is like missing a bus that comes only once a day."

    If the protein is not eaten we can feel mental fog and lassitude. Dr. Baker has worked for the Peace Corps in Africa. He points out that carbohydrates are NOT essential to life but proteins ARE

    In his chapter "Protein: the Basis of Consciousness," Dr. Baker points out that "protein provides the platform for the daytime chemistry of consciousness and action." In the morning we have higher levels of the hormones, like adrenaline, cortisone, and thyroid, which are "needed for alertness and activity." Protein eaten then, at the appropriate time when we awaken in the morning, is absolutely essential to supply the amino acids that we convert into the neurotransmitters needed for high level mental functioning. If the protein is not eaten we can feel mental fog and lassitude. Dr. Baker has worked for the Peace Corps in Africa. He points out that carbohydrates are NOT essential to life but proteins ARE:
    Protein from food is essential to the growth and maintenance of all body tissues. You can live without carbohydrates in your diet, but without protein you’d die, after becoming dull, irritable, and listless. I saw this happen when I worked in parts of Africa where babies are weaned from mother’s milk to a white, starchy gruel. After a few months on this protein-free sustenance, they became inconsolably cranky, pale, puffy, and swollen. Without careful reintroduction of protein foods, they died.
    If no carbohydrate or fat is available, protein can be burned for energy. However, it burns "dirty." Protein molecules are very complicated, consisting of twenty different amino acids in an amazing number of sizes and shapes. It is estimated that one’s body contains thirty-thousand distinct

    If no carbohydrate or fat is available, protein can be burned for energy. However, it burns "dirty."

    proteins and they are different from each other for every organism. When proteins are broken down for fuel, toxic substances result, which the body has to carefully package in order to excrete them without injury. On the other hand, carbohydrates are made up of small sugar molecules joined end to end and make an easily used fuel for our bodies. Thus, protein is absolutely necessary for tissue repair and our vast number of bodily functions—including clear thinking and strong action. However, if we consume more than we need and no carbohydrate, the burning of our protein tissues for energy is counterproductive. Thus, Dr. Baker does not recommend a diet that is pure protein and fat, although in the short run it can, of course, result in some spectacular loss of ugly storage fat. He asks for moderation. In the circadian diet, the most important points concern the timing of meals—be sure that lots of protein is included in your breakfast and lunch and save most of the carbohydrates for the evening.

    . . . Dr. Baker does not recommend a diet that is pure protein and fat, although in the short run it can, of course, result in some spectacular loss of ugly storage fat.

    He points out that carbohydrates are needed at night for the tremendous amount of activity—repair and waste disposal, which takes place when we are asleep.
    Most people have it backwards, believing that you need carbohydrates for daytime energy and not so much at night, when you are resting. But you’re not really resting. While your muscles and brain do slow down in their use of energy at night, your whole body is doing healing and repair work, and your liver is involved in detoxification. In fact, one of the key reasons you sleep at night is that your body is so engaged with energy-consuming chores that is doesn’t have enough resources to keep consciousness, biochemical replenishment, and detoxification all going at once. . . . You might wonder why you can go all night without eating when if you did the same thing during the day, you’d become hungry. While you sleep, when your muscles and brain consume less energy, and the rest of your body is engaged in repair, healing, and detoxification, your body maintains a high level of sugar in the blood. The sustained sweetness of your blood at night is your body’s way of delivering the sun’s energy to your liver and all the other organs.
    Like proteins certain fats are essential in that they are necessary for life. Our bodies can manufacture some fats, e.g., the saturated storage fat from carbohydrates. However, there are two families of fats that we can only obtain from our food—omega 3s and omega 6s. (For a discussion, description, and food sources, see NOHA NEWS, Fall 1991, "Stalking the Essential Fatty Acids.")

    Like proteins certain fats are essential in that they are necessary for life. Our bodies can manufacture some fats, e.g., the saturated storage fat from carbohydrates. However, there are two families of fats that we can only obtain from our food—omega 3s and omega 6s.

    These fats are absolutely essential. They are the precursors of prostaglandins, amazing hormones that communicate cell to cell within our bodies. These fats are also needed for properly flexible membranes around and inside all our cells. At present we tend to have low levels of essential fats, especially the omega-3s, which are the most fragile and usually destroyed for convenience in any processed foods, whose original ingredients contained them. The omega-3s give us the anti-inflammatory protaglandins and can help with all our systems. (See, for example, Omega 3 Oils: To Improve Mental Health, Fight Degenerative Diseases, and Extend Your Life by Donald Rudin, MD, and Clara Felix, Avery, 1996; also, the NOHA Audio and Video tape: Artemis Simopoilos, MD, "The Omega Plan," #169, 19/98.) Dr. Baker gives numerous dramatic examples of patients, who were helped in many ways by adding the omega-3s to their diet in the form of flax seed oil and/or sometimes cod liver oil. He himself immediately recognizes omega-3 deficiencies when he notices problems with hair, skin, and nails.

    Our intestinal flora need to be healthy. Even one course of antibiotics can disrupt the trillions of healthy germs, which we need in our gut.

    Our intestinal flora need to be healthy. Even one course of antibiotics can disrupt the trillions of healthy germs, which we need in our gut. Dr. Baker points out that our intestinal flora can perform intricate chemistry, which we cannot—for example, producing some vitamins and converting certain nutrients into protective substances.
    Dr. Baker explains to us that food provides information to our bodies. The plants, which give us carbohydrates, also contain many other nutrients (called phytonutrients), which are often the beautiful colors that sometimes were developed to protect the plant from too much sun , or, on the other hand, wonderful chemicals like the green chlorophyll, which allows plants to capture the sun’s energy for all living organisms on earth.

    Phytonutrients can have effects that are as powerful as drugs.

    Phytonutrients can signal seasons. Our ancestors had to eat food in season, perhaps it would be best if we did also. Phytonutrients can have effects that are as powerful as drugs. Dr. Baker gives many examples. He concentrates on three because, if we lined up all the special nutrients, which have been shown to be helpful, we would have no idea where to begin in choosing a few to eat each day. The three that he emphasizes are soy protein, flaxseed, and rye. The phytonutrients, specifically the isoflavones and lignans in all three, can help greatly with so-called "hormone problems." Since rye is mostly carbohydrate (and can be enjoyed in the evening), he concentrates on soy protein isolate and ground flaxseed as the basis for his "circadian diet." Soy protein isolate contains more than twice the isoflavones (genistein and daidzein) contained in regular soy protein powder and more than five times as much as found in tofu. There is even less in soy milk. Fermented soy products have been broken down by organisms outside our bodies so that we can digest them. On the other hand, soy protein isolate needs to be broken down by our own friendly gut germs for us to reap its benefits.

    Fermented soy products have been broken down by organisms outside our bodies so that we can digest them. On the other hand, soy protein isolate needs to be broken down by our own friendly gut germs for us to reap its benefits.

    Research has shown that adults can benefit from the isoflavones in soy. However, for infants who cannot be nursed and who are allergic to cow’s milk, Dr. Baker points out that the hormone-like substances in soy—even the low amounts in soy milk—may cause problems. "Infants fed soy formula have been shown to have isoflavone plasma concentrations up to twenty thousand times higher than the hormone (estradiol) levels normally found in early life." He is concerned.
    Dr. Baker wants to make having more protein at breakfast and lunch easy to do, so, he has a recipe for a basic shake to be made in a blender. It consists of milk and yogurt (with live bacteria for the gut), soy protein isolate, and ground flaxseed, plus a quarter cup of blueberries. (Editor’s note: it is delicious and easy to make.) One patient said it tastes like ice cream. On the other hand, one autistic child would not touch it. However, his father figured out how to get the same nutrients into a popsicle, which was happily consumed.
    Dr. Baker points out that some people are sensitive to milk and some to soy, so, he suggests a rice milk shake with rice protein. To increase phytonutrients, he suggests using a green food concentrate and he does write that it is best to eat a varied diet—shades of Dr. Randolph and the Rotation Diet!

    "Infants fed soy formula have been shown to have isoflavone plasma concentrations up to twenty thousand times higher than the hormone (estradiol) levels normally found in early life."

    A question we must ask: These shakes do contain processed protein—so they would contain free glutamic acid. What about MSG-sensitive people?
    Dr. Baker has many interesting suggestions about the best times to take supplements and about the effect of drugs on our circadian rhythm, for example, increasing doses of sleeping pills, like phenobarbitol, can lead to "the complete disorganization of the circadian rhythm.." He has suggestions for helping people who change work shifts and also those who travel through time zones.
    His attitude to children is delightful. He tries to treat them as intelligent beings. As a minister’s younger son, he was much exposed to adults who would hardly ever actually talk to him, as a person. Remembering his experiences, he likes to relate directly to children. He tries to make the change to the circadian diet easy for people of all ages and all cultures. He has this paragraph at the end of his chapter on children:
    On my taxi ride to be a guest on a talk show, my driver offered me this quote from an unknown source: "Love of country is the memory of the food we enjoyed as children." I’d add: Love of children can have no better expression than giving them happy memories associated with healthy food.

    Cheers

    Tansy


    [This Message was Edited on 08/24/2003]
    [This Message was Edited on 08/24/2003]
  2. EZBRUZR

    EZBRUZR New Member

    /\/\/\/\\//\/\/\//\/\//\/\/\//\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\\/\//
    Push-up

    Peace,Ez

    :~}
  3. keeponsmiling

    keeponsmiling New Member

    Makes a lot of sense. Thanks for sharing!

    Cheryll