Bruin 63

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Rosiebud, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Rosiebud

    Rosiebud New Member

    In the thread on sore feet you mentioned having RSD.

    Can you tell what that is please.

    Thanks
    Rosie
  2. Bruin63

    Bruin63 Member


    This is some information that you can find on some websites for RSD.

    Today, is a good example of my RSD pain, I have it in my legs, pretty bad. Today I didn't use my scooter, forgot my canes, and had to stand in several lines to get things for my Brother. He's in a NH and I do his errands.

    Well now my Legs are Burning, and they are Red, they almost look sunburned, but I have a tan from the summer, so I don't burn anymore.
    I was a dance, and I had some injuries, plus a Knee operation.

    My hands have it due to a CT operation that left me worse off, but back then we didn't know I had FMS or the complacations that would arise.
    Nerve damage can cause this too.

    They did damage my Nerves in my Spine, when they did a C7 Cervical Surgery on me. They admitted that right off the bat, said they Had to move the Nerves out of the way.
    They did this surgery from the back, not the front, and they call it a Laminotecy, (SP?) They take a part of the disc off the vertabrae to make room for my spinal cord.

    They also tore my Right Rotator cuff, it took 2 operations, to fix it, but I still have limited use, and a lot of Pain. Of course I have RSD damage there too.
    So some times I turn Bright Red, when the Pain flares, and it's a burning prickly pain. Hurts like, you know what, and worse than any hot Flash, even tho, they are similiar.

    I hope this information will be of help to you.
    There is a message board for thoes who suffer with this, not as busy as this board, but you can get some interesting Information, and cause's of RSD.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    What is RSD?

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome (RSD) - also known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) - is a chronic neurological syndrome characterized by:

    severe burning pain
    pathological changes in bone and skin
    excessive sweating
    tissue swelling
    extreme sensitivity to touch


    [For a complete description of RSD/CRPS symptoms, please read the Diagnosis section of the Clinical Practice Guidelines section of this website].

    There are Two Types of CRPS - Type I and Type II.

    CRPS Type I (also referred to as RSD) - cases in which the nerve injury cannot be immediately identified
    CRPS Type II (also referred to as Causalgia) - cases in which a distinct "major" nerve injury has occurred
    RSD/CRPS is best described in terms of an injury to a nerve or soft tissue (e.g. broken bone) that does not follow the normal healing path
    RSD/CRPS development does not appear to depend on the magnitude of the injury. The sympathetic nervous system seems to assume an abnormal function after an injury
    Since there is no single laboratory test to diagnose RSD/CRPS, the physician must assess and document both subjective complaints (medical history) and, if present, objective findings (physical examination).


    Criteria for Diagnosing

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I (RSD)

    The presence of an initiating noxious event, or a cause of immobilization
    Continuing pain, allodynia, or hyperalgesia with which the pain is disproportionate to any inciting event
    Evidence at some time of edema, changes in skin blood flow (skin color changes, skin temperature changes more than 1.1°C difference from the homologous body part), or abnormal sudomotor activity in the region of the pain
    This diagnosis is excluded by the existence of conditions that would otherwise account for the degree of pain and dysfunction

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II (Causalgia)

    The presence of continuing pain, allodynia, or hyperalgesia after a nerve injury, not necessarily limited to the distribution of the injured nerve
    Evidence at some time of edema, changes in skin blood flow (skin color changes, skin temperature changes more than 1.1°C difference from the homologous body part), or abnormal sudomotor activity in the region of pain.

    This diagnosis is excluded by the existence of conditions that would otherwise account for the degree of pain and dysfunction.

  3. Rosiebud

    Rosiebud New Member

    I had never heard of this condition before.

    You've had a terrible time of it haven't you.

    Thanks again

    Rosie
  4. Bruin63

    Bruin63 Member

    Yep I am in pain all the time, but if I can keep some of the cause's at bay, it's not so bad.
    (That's what I tell myself, lol)
    Glad that helped you,
    sharonk