Burning vs. Aching vs. Stabbing vs. Tenderness

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by dhcpolwnk, Sep 27, 2002.

  1. dhcpolwnk

    dhcpolwnk New Member

    I have seen descriptions of several kinds of pain on this board, and I'm not sure whether I understand correctly. Is FMS connected with all these different kinds of pain? My pain is primarily aching and tenderness, with occasional burning pain in my eyes when I'm overtired. Very rarely do I get stabbing pains, although I have gotten that in my spine, which I attribute to my multiple sclerosis. I know that different treatments can affect different kinds of pain. It would help me to know this in looking at messages on this board, and it might help me to distinguish between fibro pain and other kinds of pain if I knew which kinds of pain were most common with fibromyalgia.

    Thanks in advance for any clarification you can give me.

    --Laura
  2. dhcpolwnk

    dhcpolwnk New Member

    I have seen descriptions of several kinds of pain on this board, and I'm not sure whether I understand correctly. Is FMS connected with all these different kinds of pain? My pain is primarily aching and tenderness, with occasional burning pain in my eyes when I'm overtired. Very rarely do I get stabbing pains, although I have gotten that in my spine, which I attribute to my multiple sclerosis. I know that different treatments can affect different kinds of pain. It would help me to know this in looking at messages on this board, and it might help me to distinguish between fibro pain and other kinds of pain if I knew which kinds of pain were most common with fibromyalgia.

    Thanks in advance for any clarification you can give me.

    --Laura
  3. Allen2

    Allen2 New Member

    for Fibro people seems to be an over-all achiness, like the flu, only it doesn't go away, but waxes and wanes. Other kinds of pain also affect the joints and connective tissues: I have had burning pains in my legs and ankles, for instance. Since many with Fibro also have arthritis it is sometimes difficult to tell which illness is causing which pain(and pretty academic when your body is screaming for relief). Al

    P.S. Another kind of pain is pain in the butt from inept and discourteous doctors but I guess we shouldn't include that in an overall description of FMS(should we?)[This Message was Edited on 09/27/2002]
  4. pamela

    pamela New Member

    The fatigue came first, then the pain started. Also you get pain in your joints, stiffenss and achyness all over. When you wake up your real sore, stiff and achy. The pain can be anywhere also. Headaches, ear aches, throat aches, weird aches like your calves will ache and throb, the bottom of your feet will hurt, your hands, wrists, your breasts!!! Oh your breasts or chest will hurt, sting, burn and ache. My right breast aches constantly and I have had a mamogram too which came out okay. The doc said it was hormonal, but I think its hormones and FMS together. Every one it seems is different w/ the FMS. Also you have abdomen pain like I did in my colon area (right and left side) some days more one side thatn the other. Also your neck and shoulders have pain. Sometimes you'll have shooting pains too. This site has lots to read up on symptoms. Check out the library. You will find out alot!! Hope this helps. Pamela
  5. dhcpolwnk

    dhcpolwnk New Member

    Thank you to everyone who has answered my question about pain so far. I forgot to ask whether anybody else has ever had the feeling that your foot seemed to be breaking in half across the arch. I've gotten that kind of pain several times, though not in recent years--probably because I don't walk long distances anymore. I have flat feet and pronated ankles, and I always attributed the pain to that. But now I'm wondering whether fibro might be involved as well. The flat feet and pronated ankles might have aggravated muscles that act as trigger points to the arch. Since I haven't experienced this lately, it's not an urgent question, but I am curious. Besides that, I just got a call today to tell me that the manufacturer is going to help me pay for Avonex for my MS (about $1,000 a month). This drug is injected intramuscularly, and if possible, I want to avoid injecting it into a trigger point.

    Thanks again.

    --Laura
  6. sean

    sean New Member

    The pains are so varied from one person to another laura I have experienced most of the problems described by people on this board, but that does not mean that if you don't have all these problems you have not got this condition. Some of the problems described on here may be due to some other conditions. As for the arch of your foot I have experienced this, I believe this condition in some way effects the function of muscles and tendons, you don't say whether you get the pain in the arch of your foot only when walking, or if it effects you in a resting state. if you get it only when walking on it, you may have a strain injury, on the other hand if you have it when rested I would say most likely cause is FMS, nerve pain.. Have you got any swelling in this area? Can you remember straining the arch of your foot?
  7. dhcpolwnk

    dhcpolwnk New Member

    The "breaking" pain in my arch used to happen when I was walking. Then the area would ache for a while after I got off my feet. I was just wondering whether my flat feet and pronated ankles might have aggravated a muscle that acted as a trigger point and referred this odd pain into my foot. What I remember most is that the pain was excruciating! I couldn't bend my foot without yelling (or at least working hard to stifle a yell). There was certainly no way I could walk with this pain. If my other foot was okay at the time, I could sort of hop/limp, using just the toes of the affected foot, for a very short distance, but after a while, this could start putting a strain on the other foot. The only thing that seemed to help was getting off my feet and having my arch very gently massaged. I don't recall any swelling being associated with this.

    I know that a lot of people with FMS can't stand to be touched, and sometimes I'm like that, too. But I find that *gentle* massage of my neck and shoulder muscles helps me a lot. It seems to relax the tensed up muscles.

    --Laura
    [This Message was Edited on 09/27/2002]