Can anyone explain what is the difference in SSI and SSDI?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by silky17, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. silky17

    silky17 New Member

    Hi all,

    I think I am a little confused what the heck SSI is or does. Will they take money out of my alloted SSDI payment?

    Your help really does matter,
    Debbie
  2. jaltair

    jaltair New Member

    If you have worked, then you are eligible for SSDI, if you haven't worked, than you are elgibile for SSI. You wouldn't be getting both at the same time. You may receive SSI before SSDI kicks in (6 months after), then when SSDI starts, the SSI will stop. After SSDI, you shouldn't get any other monies. Check with the SSA if you do. You may be responsible for paying back money to SSA if you are "overpaid."

    The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs providing assistance to people with disabilities. There is often confusion about which program is more appropriate for an individual.

    While these programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program.

    (SSDI) is financed with Social Security taxes paid by workers, employers and self-employed persons. To be eligible, the worker must earn sufficient credits based on taxable work. Disability benefits are payable to disabled workers, disabled widow(er)'s or adults disabled since childhood, who are otherwise eligible. Auxiliary benefits may be payable to a worker's dependents. Monthly disability benefit payment is based on the Social Security earnings record of the insured worker on whose Social Security number the disability claim is filed.

    (SSI) is financed through general tax revenues. SSI disability benefits are payable to adults or children who are disabled or blind, who have limited income and resources, who meet the living arrangement requirements, and are otherwise eligible. Monthly payment varies up to the maximum federal benefit rate which is standardized in all States, but not everyone gets the same amount because it may be supplemented by the State or decreased by other income and resources.

    When you apply for either program, the SSA collects medical and other information from you to make a decision about whether or not you meet Social Security's definition of disability.

    SSDI: disability benefits will not begin until the sixth full month of disability. The Social Security disability waiting period begins with the first full month after the date the SSA decides your disability began.

    SSI: the SSA pays SSI disability benefits for the first full month after the date you filed your claim, or, if later, the date you become eligible for SSI.
    [This Message was Edited on 10/28/2005]
  3. puppyfreak

    puppyfreak New Member

    One thing I would add - I get SSDI and my Medicare Part A & B are automatically taken out.
    I wasn't asked if I wanted them to so I guess this is just what they do.
    But depending on the amount of your SSDI, you may qualify for Medicaid as well. Or part [or all] of your Medicare may be paid for by the state.
    This is new to me and I'm still trying to figure my own benefits out!
    But you can go to the Medicare site to find out if you're covered.

    Char
  4. hdbubblehead

    hdbubblehead New Member

    I just wanted to clap my hands in praise for excellent answers. way to go team.
  5. 69mach1

    69mach1 New Member

    FOR GIVE ME FOR MY TYPOS, IHAVE TAKNE MY AMBIAN FOR SLEEP AND IT HAS KICK IN RIGHT NOW...

    FIRST YOU CAN GO TO WWW.SSA.GOV AND THEY WILL EXPLAIN THERE..


    THAT SHOULD CLEAR EVERYTHING UP RIGHT THERE FOR YOU IN DETAILS,







    JODIE























  6. rbecca47

    rbecca47 New Member

    i applied for both ssdi and ssi, the ssa said that i will be qualify for both, because that my ssdi, was such a low amount, and they have had me apply for both on the same day. now i have my award letter for ssdi, and am still waithing on the ssi, talked to ssa a couple of days ago, and said there answer for that is being processed, then someone from ssa called me, and said i was approved they just had a few more adjustments to make. now after reading your post i a scared, because there is noway that i could live on ssdi, it is not even in the ball park of poverty level. it would be like being 200% below poverty level.
    help. becca
  7. rbecca47

    rbecca47 New Member

    i applied for both ssdi and ssi, the ssa said that i will be qualify for both, because that my ssdi, was such a low amount, and they have had me apply for both on the same day. now i have my award letter for ssdi, and am still waithing on the ssi, talked to ssa a couple of days ago, and said there answer for that is being processed, then someone from ssa called me, and said i was approved they just had a few more adjustments to make. now after reading your post i a scared, because there is noway that i could live on ssdi, it is not even in the ball park of poverty level. it would be like being 200% below poverty level.
    help. becca
  8. pam_d

    pam_d New Member

    I'm healthy enough to work (so far), like my job, etc. so I'm not looking for any benefit programs, but I read this post anyway, because I've always been confused about all the abbreviations, and I, too, just want to applaud you for the excellent explanation of SSI/SSDI! What a great description---I want to thank you for explaining this to those of us who have always been a little confused about it.

    I now know the difference. Thanks again,
    Pam
  9. JLH

    JLH New Member

    If you are unable to work at all due to a medical condition, you may qualify for disability benefits through your employer, or the Federal Government (U.S.)

    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) are the largest Federal programs providing financial assistance to people with disabilities.

    Though the medical requirements for eligibility are the same under the two programs, the way they are funded is different.

    SSDI is paid by Social Security taxes, and those who qualify for assistance receive benefits based on how much an employee has paid into the system.

    SSI is funded by general tax revenues, and those who qualify receive payments based on financial need.

    For information about the SSDI and SSI programs, contact the Social Security Administration, phone 1-800-772-1213, or on www.ssa.gov/disability

  10. silky17

    silky17 New Member

    Thats what the guy told me the other day too. He said that they don't know if I am qualified also for SSI.

    It sounded to me that I could recieve both too. I am with Becca, I am not sure I can live on what SSDI is. They also take out money for Medicare. Man that is nothing.

    I am a bit worried now.

    Debbie