Canada is open to research on XMRV - need applications

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by znewby, Jan 27, 2010.

  1. znewby

    znewby Member

    Guess what? I had written to the Minister of Health to mention the neglect of research funding for XMRV and I just got a letter back. The key line is at the end of the third paragraph. It reads:

    "While the CIHR has not yet funded research on the
    relationship between the XMRV and CFS, it would welcome funding applications from researchers interested in pursuing further work in this area of
    research."
    That sounds rather good to me!! Hope we can get some research requests for funding for XMRV research in to them.

    http://www.justworkorders.com/xmrv.pdf

    http://www.justworkorders.com/xmrv2.pdf
    [This Message was Edited on 01/27/2010]
    [This Message was Edited on 01/27/2010]
  2. fight4acure

    fight4acure Member

    Sounds like the money is there if the interest is. I hope and pray someone will help us!

    Love,
    Fight :)
  3. QuayMan

    QuayMan Member

    If you follow the link give, http://www.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/e/826.html , then click the link for "chronic fatigue syndrome":
    ------
    "The total dollar amount for the specified search criteria is $694,080.
    Your search returned 4 matches. "
    ------
    http://webapps.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/funding/detail_e?pResearchId=1728265&p_version=CIHR&p_language=E&p_session_id=697734

    Project Information
    Project Title: Investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture versus conventional care for fatigue related to infectious mononucleosis
    Period: from: 2007-05-01 to: 2010-04-30
    Principal Investigator(s): ADAMS, Denise
    Co-Investigators:
    Supervisors: VOHRA, Sunita ; YASUI, Yutaka
    Previous Investigators/Supervisors:
    Institution: University of Alberta
    Department: Public Health Sciences
    Program: Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships - Doctoral Award
    Assigned PRC: DRB
    Primary Institute: Population and Public Health
    Primary Theme: Clinical
    Keywords: ACUPUNCTURE, ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE, CLINICAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE, EPIDEMIOLOGIE, EPIDEMIOLOGY, MÉDECINE DOUCE, TRADITIONAL CHINESE MEDICINE
    Abstract: Infectious mononucleosis (IM) is a ubiquitous viral illness that is most prevalent among adolescents and young adults. The most common signs and symptoms of IM include swollen glands, sore throat, fever/chills, body aches and fatigue. For most, IM is a self-limited illness of several weeks, however, for up to 22%, fatigue may last for one month or more. The public health burden of IM is most obvious in health care visits and days absent from work or school. Although IM can be readily diagnosed through a physical exam and simple blood tests, there is no cure. Current medical treatment for fatigue is limited to rest and medications of unproven effectiveness, resulting in some patients pursuing alternative medical therapies, including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Acupuncture is one of many therapies that developed within TCM. Anecdotal and historical evidence suggests that acupuncture may be effective in treating symptoms of acute IM, including fatigue. Clinical research in fatigued populations including fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome suggest that acupuncture may be effective in relieving symptoms of these conditions. Although the mechanism of action of acupuncture is still under investigation research suggests that acupuncture may have modulating effects on the immune system. In light of this preliminary evidence and the fact that clinical research of acupuncture treatment for IM has not yet been conducted, this project proposes to investigate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for the treatment of symptoms of IM, including fatigue. The proposed research project will include the design of a pragmatic randomized controlled clinical trial and testing of the trial design through a pilot study.

    Funding Information
    Fiscal Year Amount
    2007-08 $32,500
    2008-09 $35,000
    2009-10 $35,000
    Total: $102,500
    ---------------
    http://webapps.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/funding/detail_e?pResearchId=1711355&p_version=CIHR&p_language=E&p_session_id=697734


    Project Title: Chronic fatigue syndrome and sleep disorder
    Period: from: 2001-04-01 to: 2004-03-31
    Principal Investigator(s): LIBMAN, Eva
    Co-Investigators: BALTZAN, Marcel A ; FICHTEN, Catherine Susan ; KIRMAYER, Laurence J. ; SCHONDORF, Ronald
    Supervisors:
    Previous Investigators/Supervisors:
    Institution: Jewish General Hospital (Montreal)
    Department: Psychiatry
    Program: Operating Grant
    Assigned PRC: PSB
    Primary Institute: Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction
    Primary Theme: Clinical
    Keywords: ASPECTS PSYCHOSOCIAUX/COMPORTEMENTS, CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME, COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL INSOMNIA TREATMENT, CPAP, HEALTH SERVICES, INSOMNIA, LES SERVICES DE SANTÉ, MEDICATION, PSYCHOSOCIAL AND HEALTH BEHAVIOURS, PSYCHOSOCIAL/HEALTH BEHAVIOURAL RES., SANTE ET FACTEURS PSYCHOSOCIAUX, SLEEP DISORDER, SLEEP DISORDERS, TROUBLES DE SOMMEIL
    Abstract:

    Funding Information
    Fiscal Year Amount
    2001-02 $113,838
    2002-03 $81,244
    2003-04 $81,244
    Total: $276,326
    ----------
    http://webapps.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/funding/detail_e?pResearchId=1731784&p_version=CIHR&p_language=E&p_session_id=697734


    Project Title: Structure function analysis of dual function protein kinase-RNAse signaling proteins
    Period: from: 2007-07-01 to: 2012-06-30
    Principal Investigator(s): SICHERI, Frank
    Co-Investigators:
    Supervisors:
    Previous Investigators/Supervisors:
    Institution: Mount Sinai Hospital (Toronto)
    Department: Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute
    Program: Operating Grant
    Assigned PRC: BMA
    Primary Institute: Genetics
    Primary Theme: Biomedical
    Keywords: BIOLOGIE CELLULAIRE, BIOPHYSICS, BIOPHYSIQUE, CANCER DE L'APPAREIL DIGESTIF, CELL BIOLOGY, CRYSTALLOGRAPHY X-RAY, GASTRO-INTESTINAL CANCER, LEUCEMIES, LEUKAEMIAS, PHOSPHOREGULATION, PROTEIN KINASE, RNASE, SIGNALING, SUBSTRATE RECOGNITION
    Abstract: Ire1 and RNaseL are protein kinases with a unique ability to cleave RNA. The two proteins function in very different cellular processes owing in large part to differences in their ability to recognize and cleave messenger RNA targets. RNaseL plays a key role in inhibiting the ability of viruses to replicate in human cells while Ire1 plays a key role in allowing cells to adapt to the accumulation of toxic levels of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. RNaseL cleaves RNA non-specifically which allows it to degrade all cellular and viral RNAs in the cell in response to viral infection. In contrast, Ire1 recognizes one or two messenger RNAs amongst the thousands of different transcripts expressed in the cell. RNaseL and Ire1 play important roles in many human diseases. RNaseL is critical for the interferon-mediated antiviral response during West Nile virus, hepatitis C virus, and herpes simplex virus type 1 infections by limiting the accumulation of viral RNAs. In addition, mutation of the RNASEL gene correlates with an increased incidence of prostate and pancreatic cancers. The function of RNaseL is also perturbed in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Defective Ire1 function has been implicated in human diseases such as familial Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, bipolar disorder, colitis, and neuronal death following trauma. Ire1 function is also essential for the growth of certain tumors. While Ire1 and RNaseL share similarity within their protein sequences, no similarity is apparent with known enzymes that cleave RNA. In this proposal we aim to obtain a detailed understanding of atomic structure of Ire1 and RNaseL using x-ray crystallographic methods. Our underlying hope is that our studies will open new avenues for clinical intervention centered on IRE and RNaseL to treat disease.

    Funding Information
    Fiscal Year Amount
    2007-08 $81,206
    2008-09 $108,274
    2009-10 $108,274
    Total: $297,754
    ---------------
    http://webapps.cihr-irsc.gc.ca/funding/detail_e?pResearchId=1732105&p_version=CIHR&p_language=E&p_session_id=697734


    Project Information
    Project Title: Exercise tolerance in patients diagnosed with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.
    Period: from: 2009-01-01 to: 2009-12-31
    Principal Investigator(s): TAUB, Elana Cindy
    Co-Investigators:
    Supervisors: MACINTOSH, Brian Robert
    Previous Investigators/Supervisors:
    Institution: University of Calgary
    Department:
    Program: Frederick Banting and Charles Best Canada Graduate Scholarships - Master's Award
    Assigned PRC: CGA
    Primary Institute: Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis
    Primary Theme: Clinical
    Keywords: ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD, ANS LE DOMAINE DE LA SANTÉ, CENTRAL FATIGUE, CHRONIC FATIGUE, ELECTROMYOGRAPHY, FATIGUE CHRONIQUE, GRADED EXERCISE TEST, HEALTH, MAXIMAL OXYGEN CONSUMPTION, MUSCLE, BONE, OR JOINT, MUSCLES, OS OU ARTICULATIONS, PERIPHERAL FATIGUE, POST-EXERTIONAL MALAISE
    Abstract: Not Applicable

    Funding Information
    Fiscal Year Amount
    2008-09 $4,375
    2009-10 $13,125
    Total: $17,500
  4. QuayMan

    QuayMan Member

    Here are the equivalent details for Multiple Sclerosis: "The total dollar amount for the specified search criteria is $71,664,429." which is 103 times the figure that shows up for "Chronic Fatigue Syndrome" (using the $694,080 for CFS that comes up using the keywords).

  5. QuayMan

    QuayMan Member

    I'm not sure how they get up to $874,000.
    A few studies show up for "chronic fatigue" but they don't add up to the correct amount (none appear to involve CFS patients). Results for" CFS" aren't relevant (it's an abbreviation for other phrases). "Myalgic" just gives the fourth one above.
  6. PITATOO

    PITATOO Member

    Maybe to come up with more proof? I think the more studies out there even if they may seem a waste of money that go towards a proof of exercise intolerance or other areas may be of some good. I personally can tolerate any aerobic activity, but lifiting weights a couple of years ago, I was lifting pretty heaving and lost 35 lbs and gained muscle. I just had to remember to lift slowly. My feeling is if your muslces support your body better maybe you hurt less? And before I hit the age of no return - I"m a 46 yo male I want to get back to lifting again. Just need time now. Even 5-10 minutes 3x a week would be good enough, that does not mean start out at that but work very slowly. I used to lift weights like crazy before I got sick so I think my muslces bounce back. So I don't know I guess they are trying anything and everything. Plus maybe they knew the results and it was a win for them?