CFS patient to present drug treatment plan to Am. Autonomic

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by teach6, Oct 22, 2002.

  1. teach6

    teach6 New Member

    Society.

    I received this article from my local support group. It should be of interest to all with autonomic problems. I'm sure we'll hear more after the presentation. He is looking for financial help for his travel and that of a companion to help with his wheelchair, etc. Let me know if you want to help and I'll send you an email addy for that.

    Barbara

    From the St. Louis Post Dispatch

    Debilitating disease launches local man's quest for knowledge
    This story was published in Metro on Monday, October 21, 2002.

    By Bill McClellan

    Douglas Lindsay is 24 years old. He lives with his mother in University City. I stopped by their home one evening last week. Douglas greeted me at the door. It was an effort on his part, and I knew it. His mother was lying on the sofa. She looked thin and very frail. Douglas led me to his room and motioned me to a chair. Then he sat on his bed, with his back propped up by some pillows.

    He and his mother suffer from an autonomic disorder. It is often referred to as chronic fatigue syndrome.

    It is common for people who suffer from a disease or disorder -- or who have a child who suffers from that disease or disorder -- to become knowledgeable about that disease or disorder. But Douglas Linsday has become more than knowledgeable. In fact, he will be going to Hilton Head Island, S.C., this week to present a paper at the International Symposium on the Autonomic Nervous System.

    The autonomic nervous system controls the body's basic functions such as breathing, pulse and blood pressure.

    The other presenters at the symposium are scientists and doctors, and they come from some of the most prestigious institutions in the world. Lindsay's presentation, by the way, is not any kind of "sufferer's story." It is titled, "Acute and Chronic Aspects of Dysautonomia Prompt Proposed Novel Pharmacological Treatment."

    Indeed. From his bed, he is proposing a treatment. And who are the people who are taking him seriously? I looked at a list of the directors of the American Autonomic Society. They come from New York University Medical Center, the Mayo Clinic, the Harvard Medical School and other such places.

    How did a young man who can barely get out of bed -- his mother and he have their groceries delivered -- summon the will to make this kind of effort?

    It starts, of course, with intelligence. Lindsay is a bright young man. He graduated from DeSmet High School and went to Rockhurst College in Kansas City. He studied biology, chemistry and English. He became ill the summer after his third year in college. He had a summer job doing research at Kansas University. He came down with what he thought was a heavy case of mononucleosis. But he did not get better. He got worse. He came home to recuperate.

    His mother had been disabled for years. As his own condition worsened and he found himself lying for hours in a fetal position, he was close to despair. Then he was given a diagnosis -- hypothyroidism. The wonderful news was that it could be treated. He was put on medication, and his condition improved but only a little.

    And because some of his reactions to the medication were not what he had been told to expect, he wondered if the diagnosis was correct.

    "Was it?" I asked.

    He pulled out a huge medical textbook: "Endocrinology and Metabolism." He told me he studied the book. (It has almost 2,000 pages.) He learned that thyroid problems are similar to adrenaline problems. And that is, he explained, what really got him started on his research. At least, he tried to explain. Truth is, I didn't understand most of what he told me, but I could understand his excitement. He might be on to something. He might be pointing a way to a treatment for his own condition. He has already been awarded the Benjamin Franklin Citizen Scientist Award by the Society for Amateur Scientists. A paper of his will be published in the American Autonomics Society's journal. And he goes to Hilton Head this week.

    A remarkable feat, I told him, and he said it really had a lot to do with the kindness of strangers. He would read articles in scientific journals and then call the writers. Almost always, they'd talk to him. He has talked to professors from Harvard and scientists from NASA, but the biggest help, he told me, was from a local man, Kendall Blumer from the Washington University Medical School.

    "I've probably called him 70 times," Lindsay said, "and he has always been there for me. And when I say 'Thank you,' he always says, 'My pleasure.' "

    E-mail: bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com


  2. teach6

    teach6 New Member

    Society.

    I received this article from my local support group. It should be of interest to all with autonomic problems. I'm sure we'll hear more after the presentation. He is looking for financial help for his travel and that of a companion to help with his wheelchair, etc. Let me know if you want to help and I'll send you an email addy for that.

    Barbara

    From the St. Louis Post Dispatch

    Debilitating disease launches local man's quest for knowledge
    This story was published in Metro on Monday, October 21, 2002.

    By Bill McClellan

    Douglas Lindsay is 24 years old. He lives with his mother in University City. I stopped by their home one evening last week. Douglas greeted me at the door. It was an effort on his part, and I knew it. His mother was lying on the sofa. She looked thin and very frail. Douglas led me to his room and motioned me to a chair. Then he sat on his bed, with his back propped up by some pillows.

    He and his mother suffer from an autonomic disorder. It is often referred to as chronic fatigue syndrome.

    It is common for people who suffer from a disease or disorder -- or who have a child who suffers from that disease or disorder -- to become knowledgeable about that disease or disorder. But Douglas Linsday has become more than knowledgeable. In fact, he will be going to Hilton Head Island, S.C., this week to present a paper at the International Symposium on the Autonomic Nervous System.

    The autonomic nervous system controls the body's basic functions such as breathing, pulse and blood pressure.

    The other presenters at the symposium are scientists and doctors, and they come from some of the most prestigious institutions in the world. Lindsay's presentation, by the way, is not any kind of "sufferer's story." It is titled, "Acute and Chronic Aspects of Dysautonomia Prompt Proposed Novel Pharmacological Treatment."

    Indeed. From his bed, he is proposing a treatment. And who are the people who are taking him seriously? I looked at a list of the directors of the American Autonomic Society. They come from New York University Medical Center, the Mayo Clinic, the Harvard Medical School and other such places.

    How did a young man who can barely get out of bed -- his mother and he have their groceries delivered -- summon the will to make this kind of effort?

    It starts, of course, with intelligence. Lindsay is a bright young man. He graduated from DeSmet High School and went to Rockhurst College in Kansas City. He studied biology, chemistry and English. He became ill the summer after his third year in college. He had a summer job doing research at Kansas University. He came down with what he thought was a heavy case of mononucleosis. But he did not get better. He got worse. He came home to recuperate.

    His mother had been disabled for years. As his own condition worsened and he found himself lying for hours in a fetal position, he was close to despair. Then he was given a diagnosis -- hypothyroidism. The wonderful news was that it could be treated. He was put on medication, and his condition improved but only a little.

    And because some of his reactions to the medication were not what he had been told to expect, he wondered if the diagnosis was correct.

    "Was it?" I asked.

    He pulled out a huge medical textbook: "Endocrinology and Metabolism." He told me he studied the book. (It has almost 2,000 pages.) He learned that thyroid problems are similar to adrenaline problems. And that is, he explained, what really got him started on his research. At least, he tried to explain. Truth is, I didn't understand most of what he told me, but I could understand his excitement. He might be on to something. He might be pointing a way to a treatment for his own condition. He has already been awarded the Benjamin Franklin Citizen Scientist Award by the Society for Amateur Scientists. A paper of his will be published in the American Autonomics Society's journal. And he goes to Hilton Head this week.

    A remarkable feat, I told him, and he said it really had a lot to do with the kindness of strangers. He would read articles in scientific journals and then call the writers. Almost always, they'd talk to him. He has talked to professors from Harvard and scientists from NASA, but the biggest help, he told me, was from a local man, Kendall Blumer from the Washington University Medical School.

    "I've probably called him 70 times," Lindsay said, "and he has always been there for me. And when I say 'Thank you,' he always says, 'My pleasure.' "

    E-mail: bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com