Chronic Fatigue Linked to Polio! Please Read!

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by TeresaBnGA, Sep 14, 2002.

  1. TeresaBnGA

    TeresaBnGA New Member

    Hey all!
    I found this while browsing through some research findings and thought that you all would be interested in reading the findings.

    Soft hugs!
    Teresa :)


    Book Ties Chronic Fatigue to Mild Polio
    June 21, 2002 06:12:14 AM PST, HealthScout News

    By Randy Dotinga
    HealthScoutNews Reporter

    FRIDAY, June 21 (HealthScoutNews) -- Could the roots of chronic fatigue syndrome be found in the polio epidemic of a half-century ago?
    An expert in the treatment of polio survivors says a new survey shows it does, but a critic contends the findings are unreliable.

    Richard L. Bruno, director of New Jersey's Post-Polio Institute, claims in a new book that 20 percent of older people who suffer from chronic fatigue may have been infected with a mild form of the polio virus.

    According to Bruno, the findings could hold new hope for chronic fatigue patients, who could learn from the techniques used to help polio survivors deal with the aftereffects of their infections. "The symptoms can be managed, and further damage may even be prevented," he says.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is one of the most controversial diagnoses in medicine. Some experts claim it is imaginary, and possibly a symptom of mental illnesses such as depression. Others suspect viruses and sleep disorders are at fault.

    Whatever the cause, people with chronic fatigue say they suffer from weakness, tiredness, muscle aches, sore throat and fever. Some complain of memory loss and confusion.

    Researchers at DePaul University estimate that more than 800,000 people nationwide suffer from chronic fatigue. Half are over 40, and the majority are women.

    Bruno works with people who have post-polio syndrome, an energy-sapping condition that shares many of its symptoms with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Bruno suspects the roots of chronic fatigue in many patients may lie in mild polio infections from the past. In the middle decades of the last century, thousands of American children reportedly suffered from an illness called "the summer grippe," which caused high fevers, flu symptoms and sore necks. The children recovered and never knew they had suffered from a minor form of polio, Bruno says.

    Last year, Bruno contacted chronic fatigue support groups and sent surveys to sufferers asking about childhood illnesses. Nearly 600 people responded from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Bruno reports his findings in a book published this month called The Polio Paradox: Uncovering the Hidden History of Polio to Understand and Treat 'Post-Polio Syndrome' and Chronic Fatigue. The findings have not been published in any scientific journal.

    Of those surveyed who were born before the polio vaccine became available in the mid-1950s, 20 percent reported suffering from an illness with a fever, typically around 1947.

    Of those 20 percent, about a third reported suffering from a stiff neck (a sign of polio infection), a third were hospitalized, and two-thirds reported having muscle weakness.

    Judging by those symptoms, Bruno suspects the 20 percent who reported a childhood illness may have had a mild form of polio that damaged the lower part of the brain, the location of "the nerves that keep your brain awake and focus attention."

    Later in life, "brown-outs" in the brain could cause symptoms of chronic fatigue, he says.

    Dr. James Grisolia, a neurologist with Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, questions the numbers in Bruno's survey. He points out that Bruno didn't compare the results to normal people who don't suffer from chronic fatigue. "There's no information on how often the rest of us had viral illnesses in childhood," he says.

    Also, he adds, the study results rely solely on memory instead of more reliable sources such as medical records and direct observation.

    Instead of pointing the finger solely at polio, Grisolia says "it's much more likely that a variety of infections or other illnesses can trigger chronic fatigue syndrome."

    Bruno stands by his findings, and says they suggest some chronic fatigue sufferers may wish to follow the advice he gives to post-polio syndrome patients: Don't push yourself too hard physically, and rest when you feel like it.

    "Both of these groups need to listen to their bodies, and do what their bodies are telling them," he says.


  2. TeresaBnGA

    TeresaBnGA New Member

    Hey all!
    I found this while browsing through some research findings and thought that you all would be interested in reading the findings.

    Soft hugs!
    Teresa :)


    Book Ties Chronic Fatigue to Mild Polio
    June 21, 2002 06:12:14 AM PST, HealthScout News

    By Randy Dotinga
    HealthScoutNews Reporter

    FRIDAY, June 21 (HealthScoutNews) -- Could the roots of chronic fatigue syndrome be found in the polio epidemic of a half-century ago?
    An expert in the treatment of polio survivors says a new survey shows it does, but a critic contends the findings are unreliable.

    Richard L. Bruno, director of New Jersey's Post-Polio Institute, claims in a new book that 20 percent of older people who suffer from chronic fatigue may have been infected with a mild form of the polio virus.

    According to Bruno, the findings could hold new hope for chronic fatigue patients, who could learn from the techniques used to help polio survivors deal with the aftereffects of their infections. "The symptoms can be managed, and further damage may even be prevented," he says.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is one of the most controversial diagnoses in medicine. Some experts claim it is imaginary, and possibly a symptom of mental illnesses such as depression. Others suspect viruses and sleep disorders are at fault.

    Whatever the cause, people with chronic fatigue say they suffer from weakness, tiredness, muscle aches, sore throat and fever. Some complain of memory loss and confusion.

    Researchers at DePaul University estimate that more than 800,000 people nationwide suffer from chronic fatigue. Half are over 40, and the majority are women.

    Bruno works with people who have post-polio syndrome, an energy-sapping condition that shares many of its symptoms with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Bruno suspects the roots of chronic fatigue in many patients may lie in mild polio infections from the past. In the middle decades of the last century, thousands of American children reportedly suffered from an illness called "the summer grippe," which caused high fevers, flu symptoms and sore necks. The children recovered and never knew they had suffered from a minor form of polio, Bruno says.

    Last year, Bruno contacted chronic fatigue support groups and sent surveys to sufferers asking about childhood illnesses. Nearly 600 people responded from the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Bruno reports his findings in a book published this month called The Polio Paradox: Uncovering the Hidden History of Polio to Understand and Treat 'Post-Polio Syndrome' and Chronic Fatigue. The findings have not been published in any scientific journal.

    Of those surveyed who were born before the polio vaccine became available in the mid-1950s, 20 percent reported suffering from an illness with a fever, typically around 1947.

    Of those 20 percent, about a third reported suffering from a stiff neck (a sign of polio infection), a third were hospitalized, and two-thirds reported having muscle weakness.

    Judging by those symptoms, Bruno suspects the 20 percent who reported a childhood illness may have had a mild form of polio that damaged the lower part of the brain, the location of "the nerves that keep your brain awake and focus attention."

    Later in life, "brown-outs" in the brain could cause symptoms of chronic fatigue, he says.

    Dr. James Grisolia, a neurologist with Scripps Mercy Hospital in San Diego, questions the numbers in Bruno's survey. He points out that Bruno didn't compare the results to normal people who don't suffer from chronic fatigue. "There's no information on how often the rest of us had viral illnesses in childhood," he says.

    Also, he adds, the study results rely solely on memory instead of more reliable sources such as medical records and direct observation.

    Instead of pointing the finger solely at polio, Grisolia says "it's much more likely that a variety of infections or other illnesses can trigger chronic fatigue syndrome."

    Bruno stands by his findings, and says they suggest some chronic fatigue sufferers may wish to follow the advice he gives to post-polio syndrome patients: Don't push yourself too hard physically, and rest when you feel like it.

    "Both of these groups need to listen to their bodies, and do what their bodies are telling them," he says.


  3. kadywill

    kadywill New Member

    used to tell the story that I tested positive for the polio virus when I was four years old, but I never showed any symptoms except for flu-like ones. I never gave this much credence until I read this because, according to my mother, I had everything in the book.
    Thanks for this post!

    Sincerely,
    Kady
  4. Copper2002

    Copper2002 New Member

    tells a story of me having a high fever and being 'paralyzed' for a short time, and 'they' called it mild polio. I was under 1 year old, so have no personal recollection. I did, as an adult, decide that 'paralyzed' probably meant extremely lethargic, as babies are when seriously ill.

    I actually had considered this connection, tho I have FMS not CFS, several years ago. But, Mom's faculties are slipping as she gets older, and she doesn't remember now.

    Did Bruno suggest any tests that would specifically identify former presence of the polio virus? It would be an interesting subject to pursue.

    Thanks for sharing this!
    Copper
    Let Miracles Replace all Grievances
  5. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    This is rather scary given the current concern over biological warfare. I see in the news this eve that smallpox vaccine is being considered in the US, health care workers first, I found the article on foxnews.com. Wouldn't it be something if the govt was aware of something like this all along. Very scary.

    Jaci
  6. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    I see Tom Daschle is suggesting the west nile was planted here via terrorism, could there be more going on than we know about????

    Jaci
  7. Shoobie

    Shoobie New Member

    You and Menace always find the greatest articles!

    -Agent 99
  8. herblady

    herblady New Member

    i read about this a while bac, pretty far back. i think i posted about it. the article i was reading said it was the polio vaccine. makes me mad. cindi
  9. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    I am 41, born in 1960, wondering if any of you remember the vaccine controversy involving the Jonas Salk vaccine vs another one???

    I am not sure of these facts but I will research them today, it just seems to me that I have a vague memory of some sort of problem............I did not pay attn at the time cuz I probably thought could not apply to me.

    Jaci
  10. garyandkim

    garyandkim New Member

    Sometimes my legs just feel like they aren't wanting to go and so weak and not just the legs, all over. The legs wanting or feeling like they are going to give out has increased in the past few months off and on that is why the test. This does make sence. We know that Vacs. have many different reactions and some get the disease. This all sounds very logical to us and founded through science.
    I also drop things sometimes and it isn't because it is heavy or I'm not paying attention.

    Thanks so much for the artical, Kim and Gary
  11. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    bump again, slow weekends.

    Jaci

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