CMP--Myofascial pain--triggerpoints????

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Jen102, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. Jen102

    Jen102 New Member

    I am hoping others can help me. I am sick with fms, cfs, cmp, and mcs. I am following many of Teitelbaum's protocols, including treating sleep, pain, hormones, nutritional deficits. At some point, I may begin lymes treatment. The thing that has been most helpful to me has been gutathione iv's. Now, my question:

    It feels like every muscle in my body is contracted and has triggerpoints, therefor the chronic myofascial pain diagnosis. I understand how self-treatment of triggerpoints works to release the muscle, but how do you help yourself when virtually all muscles are affected? It seems like I can release some in my neck, for example, but just create more in my hands and arms fixing the neck ones.

    It seems like triggerpoint treatment is great for an athlete, let's say, who is otherwise healthy, but gets a sports injury. But it doesn't seem helpful to me, who has trp's all over my body.

    There must be some cause for the trp's which can be corrected, rather than just trying to deactivate them. Does anyone know the cause or cure for myofascial pain? I have read on John Lowe's website about ground substance being in the muscles, but he doesn't give the answer for how to get this ground substance moving again. I think he is speaking of hyaralonic acid (not sure of spelling).

    Can anyone enlighten me? Anyone had luck in systematically resolving their triggerpoints/myofascial pain? I feel like my fibromyalgia pain is somewhat better, but the cmp continues to be very bad.

    Thanks for any help you can offer. Jen102
  2. Jen102

    Jen102 New Member

    hoping for some insight
  3. jaltair

    jaltair New Member

    Having massages on a regular basis with someone trained in trigger point release is the key. Even once a month is worth the cost of a good massage when you consider comfort as well as costs for doctor's visit.

    Problems are related to postural problems. Sometimes people have scoliosis or kyphosis.

    Ask your doctor for a referral to physical therapy (PT). The therapist is trained to assess postural problems and can work to help improve your posture through use of heat, massage and exercise. I went for about 6 weeks and really benefited. I learned where my problems were and what exercise I could do to help correct the problems. This has helped the myofascial pain quite a bit, and then massage helps to relax the muscles.

    PT is recognized over chiropractic by western medicine, and honestly, I've had more benefit through PT. I've tried both.
  4. Jen102

    Jen102 New Member

    i agree with you that posture is an issue and cause of trp's. I have so little energy that it is difficult to sit upright and to have proper posture. Most of the time I have to prop myself with pillows or use my wheelchair with a high backrest to support my head. I feel like the slight tipping back exacerbates the trp's, but until i have more energy, don't know what to do about it.

    i will see if there is anyone in the area who can provide massage/pt, who understands trp's. Somehow, i am not hopeful, but could be suprised.

    Thanks for the suggestions. Jen102
  5. Dee50

    Dee50 New Member

    It feels like every muscle in my body is contracted and has triggerpoints, therefor the chronic myofascial pain diagnosis. I understand how self-treatment of triggerpoints works to release the muscle, but how do you help yourself when virtually all muscles are affected? It seems like I can release some in my neck, for example, but just create more in my hands and arms fixing the neck ones

    Boy can I understand this! You are talking about my body!! It started with a hand and forearm (both) injury at work in a factory and 3 years later it is in my whole body:-( I still can't write in longhand.

    I've had tons of PT. Deep tissue is out(makes it worse) but reflexology did help some for my neck. But nothing has helped my hands except to get my colon moving better, and I use the trigger points in accupressure on my forearm beside my wrist to get my colon moving and that works. I don't know why it helps but it does. Please let me know if you find the answer to this :)About 16 years ago I got a bad whiplash that caused this pain in my neck.

    Maybe we need to be on the Guia thing Mickie does. It has worked for her pain.
    Take care,
    Dee50


    [This Message was Edited on 02/02/2006]
  6. Jen102

    Jen102 New Member

    thanks for your reply. sounds like you and i are in the same boat.

    i am taking guai by the way. I am not avoiding all salycilites (sp?), but taking the guai anyway. My doc thinks guai helps, but thinks it does so in a different way from Dr. St. Armand. I don't know, but recently I quit taking it and I hurt quite a bit more, and i was more puffy.

    I have my own little theory--maybe it has no scientific validity, but just my own observations. I wonder if the multiple trp's block the movement of lymphatic fluids in our body, and the guai helps to keep things moving--thus, less puffiness when I take guai.

    Blessings to you. jen102