COPING

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by PVLady, Jun 2, 2006.

  1. PVLady

    PVLady New Member

    The following was taken from the "coping" section of the immune support site.

    Coping with Fibromyalgia

    Many people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and fibromyalgia experience episodes of unclear thinking or cognitive dysfunction. They become forgetful, lose their train of thought, forget words or mix them up. This is what is popularly called “brain fog” or “fibro fog.”
    Following are some basic memory and communication tips that can help you deal with episodes of minor cognitive dysfunction.

    Here are some common-sense pointers that can help you clear the fog:

    1. Repeat yourself. Repeat things to yourself over and over again. Repetition will keep thoughts fresh in your mind.

    2. Write it down. Whether you write in a calendar, in a notebook or on sticky notes, if you're afraid you won't remember something, putting pen to paper can help.

    3. Pick your best time. If there is something you need to do that requires concentration and memory, such as balancing your checkbook or following a recipe, pick your best time to do it. Many people with fibromyalgia say they perform best early in the day.

    4. Get treated. Depression, pain and sleep deprivation can influence your ability to concentrate and remember. Getting your medical problems treated may indirectly help your memory.

    5. Engage yourself. Reading a book, seeing a play, or working a complex crossword or jigsaw puzzle can stimulate your brain and your memory.

    6. Stay active. Physical activity, in moderation, can increase your energy and help lift your fibro fog. Speak to your doctor or physical therapist about an exercise program that is right for you.

    7. Explain yourself. Explain your memory difficulties to family members and close friends. Memory problems often result from stress. Getting a little understanding from the ones you love may help.

    8. Keep it quiet. A radio blasting from the next room, a TV competing for your attention, or background conversation can distract your attention from the task at hand. If possible, move to a quiet place and minimize distractions when you are trying to remember.

    9. Go slowly. Sometimes memory problems can result from trying to do too much in too short a period of time. Break up tasks, and don't take on more than you can handle at once. Stress and fatigue will only make the situation worse.

    Source: © 2003 The Arthritis Foundation (www.arthritis.org)
  2. gladone

    gladone New Member

    Good tips....Bumping for more to see!
  3. suzette1954

    suzette1954 New Member

    We talk about our brain fog on here alot, but this was the first time I had actually seen it in an article.

    Mine gets sooo bad. One day I forgot my son-in-laws name and he was sitting next to me!! I have to write every thing down now. I have a spiral notebook by the phone and Ive got everyones phone # for those times when my mind goes blank

    Suzette
  4. cinnveet

    cinnveet New Member

    Our perceptions and coping techniques help define our experience of our illness. We learn the difference between hope and expectation in our search for the magic bullet. We wish for discovery of the cause and cure but learn to settle for anything that helps us to feel better and function more normally. We have no choice about being ill but have many options as to how to handle symptoms, losses, and limitations.

    Coping means giving up the fairytale notion that life is fair or simple, as we reluctantly accept its difficulties and complexities. We develop realistic strategies for dealing with rotten circumstances. As researchers continue to seek effective treatments and (dare we hope?) a cure, we cannot afford to wait passively to e rescued. Despite feelings of helplessness and defeat at times we remain our own best sources of effective coping strategies.

    I am so glad you listed some pointers to help us. Thank you so much for doing that as it is a great help to me as well as others.

    God Bless,
    Cindy