Cpap users help me.

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by beans, Nov 25, 2002.

  1. beans

    beans New Member

    I am a cpap user.

    I am so sensitive to the design of the mask that I am searching for one that will be comfortable.
    Now the one I am using is making blisters between my eyes.

    The last one I had was the best but it was too big for my face.
    I do not likes tons of head gear.

    If you use one what mask do you like best?

    Beans
  2. beans

    beans New Member

    I am a cpap user.

    I am so sensitive to the design of the mask that I am searching for one that will be comfortable.
    Now the one I am using is making blisters between my eyes.

    The last one I had was the best but it was too big for my face.
    I do not likes tons of head gear.

    If you use one what mask do you like best?

    Beans
  3. DebinMN

    DebinMN New Member

    HI Beans:

    I am a CPAP user for over a year now. What kind of machine do you have? Do you have a water jug on it (warm humidity type)? If not, that would be my first suggestion for you...the water makes things alot easier. If you do have this, you may simply want to do a search for CPAP masks, as I did. When I first got my machine, I HATED IT....it took 3-4 different masks before I got one that is decent....its a struggle, but well worth it. I sleep better, and hubby does too.
  4. beans

    beans New Member

    Thanks for the Cpap information but I need a name so I can research and order.Beans
  5. Betsy2

    Betsy2 New Member

    Wow! What a rough night! I too have sleep apnea but have not been able to adjust to CPAP. I have tried a smaller mask, less oxygen (from 15cm to 10cm)and tried taking Ambien. I cough, I am uncomfortable with all the head gear and my insurance will only allow a cool mist humidifier. Presently I don't have a CPAP machine because I moved and I need to get new health insurance. I know it can be fatal not using it but I need to find a way to acclaimate myself to using it. The tech at the sleep clinic in the hopital (before I moved) suggested that I come in and take naps in the hospital every day so they could watch me to see what was going on. I am hypersensitive and am having a hard time dealing with it.

    Betsy
  6. 1maqt

    1maqt New Member

    ME TOO!! FOR OVER 8 YRS. THEY HAVE A HEADGEAR AND BREATHING
    APPARATICE THAT IS MADE FOR PEOPLE W/CLAUSTRAPHOBIA...IT DOES NOT COBVER THE FACE, RATHER THE AIR HOSE IS FITTED WITH
    RUBBER DISCS, VERY SOFT AND PLYABLE, THAT FIT IN THE NOSTRALS. THE CAP THAT COVERS THE FACE MADE ME SWEAT, AND BLEW AIR INTO MY EYES. HATEDIT. TWO YEARS AGO MY SLEEP THERAPIST FITTED ME W/ THE NEW MODEL AND I AM HAPPIER.
    WILL TRY TOMORROW TO FIND PAPERS ON MY MACHINE, TOO LATE TONIGHT WOULD WAKE UP THE HOUSE LOOKING. IT IS SO MUCH LESS CUMBERSOME.GOD LOVES US.
    1MAQT
  7. Lanie

    Lanie New Member

    that if you go to a pulmonary doctor, they can have one fitted for you. It is customized to the individual. Hope this helps.
    Lanie
  8. TheUnicorn

    TheUnicorn New Member

    Some of my patients who were claustrophic and/or had difficulty finding a comfortable mask were well served by nasal CPAP. After switching to a nasal mask, there was only one (our of very many) who still could not make herself comfortable.

    Unicorn
  9. Monk

    Monk New Member

    My CPAP is set to 10cm air pressure and I use a gel-mask. I have never been able to get use to it. The only probleme I've had (besides all around discomfort and leaking) was that my upper lip would hurt every morning.

    I was told there are three options for sleep apnea: CPAP, UP3 surgery (very nasty), and jaw realignment (also not much fun).

    So I did two things: I went to an ENT doctor and he told me that I have a deviated septum and should get it fixed. What good is a CPAP if you can't breath right in the first place?

    OK, so I had the surgery and the anestesia caused a CFS flare-up that put me in bed for a week but I got through it. My nose is finally healed and I am breathing great!

    Then I went to my dentist and talked to him about having the jaw realignment surgery. They break and realign your jaw, wire it shut for weeks, and make you eat everything through a straw. Fun!

    He said not to go that route and that he could realign my jaw with an orthotic. This is kind of like wearing a mouth guard. So he made one for me and now I am no longer clenching and grinding my teath.

    The even bigger surprise is that it enabled me to stop wearing the CPAP!

    Now I am not implying that this is a cure for everyone but when I was checked out by the sleep lab, no one mentioned anything about getting checked for a deviated septum.

    My dentist said that when we fall asleep our jaw tends to move back and partially close off the airway, and then our body responds by moving the jaw forward to clear the airway. In the process of all of this we end up clenching and grinding our teeth. I'm not sure if the sleep lab actually asked me if I was clenching and grinding but it sure seems to me that they are not communicating with doctors in the dental community.

    To make a long story short, I would recommend getting these things checked out as it never occurred to me that I was clenching and grinding, and I never knew that I had a deviated septum. I owe a lot to my dentist and ENT as I haven't worn my CPAP for months now and I am doing well on 7 hours sleep without tiredness in the morning.

    My next step is to get another sleep study done to see if I still have apneas.

    Steve