Diagnosed in 2003 new doc says no

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by heather_child, Nov 11, 2006.

  1. heather_child

    heather_child New Member

    Hi I am a 36 yr old f, I was diagnosed in 2003 by a rhemotologist and seen him for the last 2 years. i got a letter from his office telling me that he was leaving and moving to the University of MO. Now i found a new doc and he said that i dont have FM. he says that i am just depressed. i live in a small town and finding a good doc is hard. i just needed to vent.
    thanks
  2. lenasvn

    lenasvn New Member

    Get rid of him! better no doc than a doc like that! Don't waste another minute. I spent too much time with docs who wouldn't do an iota for me.

    Look around for docs in nearby towns. It might be worth the effort. Some areas seem harder than others when it comes to FM acceptance/diagnosis. E Washington State where I am seem to be a pain in the rear, but W washington State has plenty of docs educated on the subject.
    [This Message was Edited on 11/11/2006]
  3. suz45

    suz45 New Member

    If you have documentation from a specialist than I would think this new doctor needs to look at the info again, If at all possible dump this doc. Any Doctor that openly disagrees with another specialists report and replaces it with depression which often is used as a catch all excuse doesn't deserve your time or $$$$$$$$. Remember your insurance company and you are paying him/her.

    Cut loose now and find a doctor that is willing to take a serious look at the findings and treat you approprialry.

    Good Luck,

    Suz45
  4. DorothyVivian

    DorothyVivian New Member

    Heather, dear, your experience is so sad and so troubling! But please realize it is the limitations of this doctor which are the hindrance to better care--not you!

    Twenty years ago, after going to several other doctors, I finally found someone who dx'd me properly, even though he had to modify the diagnosis in several years, as he and the medical community, learned more. He is now in his early 80's and will, no doubt, retire soon. But even at his advanced age, he's more intelligent, perceptive, open minded and humble than doctors half his age.

    I've found the doctors (and others in the health care professions) who are inclined to 'pooh-pooh' these complex syndromes we have--are those who are unwilling, or unable to make the efforts necessary to delve into these syndromes deeply enough to realize there are several causative factors involved. It's just too tough and puzzling to them.

    Many times, these symplistic doctors take a 'reductionistic' approach. That is, they reduce these complex syndromes to one, or possibly two causes. They most often cite depression or psycho-social factors as being the complete answers to Chronic Fatigue Syndrom and Fibromyalgia.

    Undoubtedly depression is involved in any condition that is chronic, painful and severely disabling! And, any chronic, disabling condition will most certainly have psychosocial consequences--such as loss of employment and strained relationships--to name only two painful psychosocial consequences of chronic and severe disablities.

    Further, depression is a well-known stage of grieving any significant loss. For example, in coping with the losses of employment and subsequent income and social status are highly significant losses quite common in the lives of those of us with Fibromyalgia and CFS.

    Added to these saddening external losses, the daily experience of disabling pain is a severe internal loss. (Until we suffer continuing pain, we take relatively pain-free life for granted.)

    And the loss of personal efficacy--that is, being mostly unable to do simple daily tasks that were once easily and quickly accomplished--this is an ongoing daily repetition of sorrow and loss! We are reminded constantly of our losses in these little daily limitations.

    For instance, when I first became severely ill, I found it terribly depressing when I could not walk to the toilet from my bed during a severe 'flare'--my feet were so sore I couldn't stand on them, so I crawled. This was DEPRESSING! (Gradually, I have regained the ability to walk, but I am still hesitant and slow, where I was once agile and quick.)

    Some naive doctors like to believe they can understand and cure almost anything. It is very difficult for them to admit ignorance and an inability to 'fix' the patient confronting them with the conditions most of us with Fibro and CFS experience. So there is a tendency to dismiss us or to hold us responsible for being ill.

    The two admonitions we often hear from professional and laypersons alike are (1)You'll feel better if you exercise more; and (2)You're depressed and an antidepressant will take care of your symptoms. (Implied is that this is all in your mind and thus, not quite real.)

    Many of us have tried to follow these recommendations. I took two antidepressants, each for six months--and these helped only intermittently. When I became finally able to do so, I walked a mile daily. However, the disease process has continued and the symptoms have shifted to other areas of my body. Presently, my digestive system is messed up, my joints ache, and my vision is affected.

    About depression: I've over 40 years study of psychology and 30 years of clinical practice as a therapist. I have two masters in counseling psychology--one in marriage and family counseling and one in rehabilitation counseling. For both professional and personal reasons, I have engaged in 15 years of personal therapy, including five years of depth 'Jungian; analysis.

    And so I take another deeper and more comprehensive perspective upon the depression that many of us experience as part of these syndromes of FM and CFS. I've learned that the soul, mind and the body cannot be separated and that depression is a part of any chronic disabling condition.

    In rehabilitation counseling, I learned that depression, to varying degrees, is a natural experience almost inevitably present in any ongoing condition that is moderately to severely disabling. Depression is present in disabling conditions which stem from accidents, illnesses and/or aging.

    And, most importantly--Depression is a natural stage of grieving the losses of self-efficacy. Especially in an illness with disabling limitations of self-efficacy, such as the crushing exhaustion of CFIDS and the painful weakening of muscles of Fibromyalgia. Combined with the 'brain fog', those of us with these symptoms upon a daily basis, are plunged into grief over and over. We are reminded over and over how just a few short months or years ago we could do something easily and quickly that we now cannot do at all. This experience of loss is depressing! Our own tendency is first to deny what we are experiencing and to disbelieve our own experiences.

    It is extremely important to grieve these losses openly and honestly. To pretend we are okey-dokey is to court the disaster of deeper depression the moment our defenses are lowered. (We don't have to wallow in complaints. We simply need to acknowledge to ourselves our sorrow. Paradoxically, this helps the sorrow to lift.)

    Heather, when we meet with a dismissive attitude from a health care person who is supposed to help us to deal with our struggles--it can be extremely discouraging.

    Fortunately there are fewer of these persons than ever before. Dear friend--there are people who are speaking out and making their experiences with Fibro and CFS known and better understood. This is another major reason why this forum of sharing is so important!

    Please know your experiences are real--and not due only to depression. For instance, viruses that play a big role in these syndromes can be found to be present in our blood through more sophisticated tests. And other laboratory tests are now becoming refined enough to discern more of the physiological processes going on.

    BTW..I'm agreeing that depression, as a major factor, can become extreme and seriously disabling, in and of itself. But, I do not agree that depression alone accounts for these disease processes.

    I agree that sooner, rather than later, you'll find a doctor who is better informed and more willing to 'hang in there' with you and give you the appropriate and effective treatment you need to maximize the quality of your life.

    Keep looking until you find someone who treats you with the caring respect you deserve, as we all deserve!

    With love, Dorothy

  5. DorothyVivian

    DorothyVivian New Member

    Heather, dear, your experience is so sad and so troubling! But please realize it is the limitations of this doctor which are the hindrance to better care--not you!

    Twenty years ago, after going to several other doctors, I finally found someone who dx'd me properly, even though he had to modify the diagnosis in several years, as he and the medical community, learned more. He is now in his early 80's and will, no doubt, retire soon. But even at his advanced age, he's more intelligent, perceptive, open minded and humble than doctors half his age.

    I've found the doctors (and others in the health care professions) who are inclined to 'pooh-pooh' these complex syndromes we have--are those who are unwilling, or unable to make the efforts necessary to delve into these syndromes deeply enough to realize there are several causative factors involved. It's just too tough and puzzling to them.

    Many times, these symplistic doctors take a 'reductionistic' approach. That is, they reduce these complex syndromes to one, or possibly two causes. They most often cite depression or psycho-social factors as being the complete answers to Chronic Fatigue Syndrom and Fibromyalgia.

    Undoubtedly depression is involved in any condition that is chronic, painful and severely disabling! And, any chronic, disabling condition will most certainly have psychosocial consequences--such as loss of employment and strained relationships--to name only two painful psychosocial consequences of chronic and severe disablities.

    Further, depression is a well-known stage of grieving any significant loss. For example, in coping with the losses of employment and subsequent income and social status are highly significant losses quite common in the lives of those of us with Fibromyalgia and CFS.

    Added to these saddening external losses, the daily experience of disabling pain is a severe internal loss. (Until we suffer continuing pain, we take relatively pain-free life for granted.)

    And the loss of personal efficacy--that is, being mostly unable to do simple daily tasks that were once easily and quickly accomplished--this is an ongoing daily repetition of sorrow and loss! We are reminded constantly of our losses in these little daily limitations.

    For instance, when I first became severely ill, I found it terribly depressing when I could not walk to the toilet from my bed during a severe 'flare'--my feet were so sore I couldn't stand on them, so I crawled. This was DEPRESSING! (Gradually, I have regained the ability to walk, but I am still hesitant and slow, where I was once agile and quick.)

    Some naive doctors like to believe they can understand and cure almost anything. It is very difficult for them to admit ignorance and an inability to 'fix' the patient confronting them with the conditions most of us with Fibro and CFS experience. So there is a tendency to dismiss us or to hold us responsible for being ill.

    The two admonitions we often hear from professional and laypersons alike are (1)You'll feel better if you exercise more; and (2)You're depressed and an antidepressant will take care of your symptoms. (Implied is that this is all in your mind and thus, not quite real.)

    Many of us have tried to follow these recommendations. I took two antidepressants, each for six months--and these helped only intermittently. When I became finally able to do so, I walked a mile daily. However, the disease process has continued and the symptoms have shifted to other areas of my body. Presently, my digestive system is messed up, my joints ache, and my vision is affected.

    About depression: I've over 40 years study of psychology and 30 years of clinical practice as a therapist. I have two masters in counseling psychology--one in marriage and family counseling and one in rehabilitation counseling. For both professional and personal reasons, I have engaged in 15 years of personal therapy, including five years of depth 'Jungian; analysis.

    And so I take another deeper and more comprehensive perspective upon the depression that many of us experience as part of these syndromes of FM and CFS. I've learned that the soul, mind and the body cannot be separated and that depression is a part of any chronic disabling condition.

    In rehabilitation counseling, I learned that depression, to varying degrees, is a natural experience almost inevitably present in any ongoing condition that is moderately to severely disabling. Depression is present in disabling conditions which stem from accidents, illnesses and/or aging.

    And, most importantly--Depression is a natural stage of grieving the losses of self-efficacy. Especially in an illness with disabling limitations of self-efficacy, such as the crushing exhaustion of CFIDS and the painful weakening of muscles of Fibromyalgia. Combined with the 'brain fog', those of us with these symptoms upon a daily basis, are plunged into grief over and over. We are reminded over and over how just a few short months or years ago we could do something easily and quickly that we now cannot do at all. This experience of loss is depressing! Our own tendency is first to deny what we are experiencing and to disbelieve our own experiences.

    It is extremely important to grieve these losses openly and honestly. To pretend we are okey-dokey is to court the disaster of deeper depression the moment our defenses are lowered. (We don't have to wallow in complaints. We simply need to acknowledge to ourselves our sorrow. Paradoxically, this helps the sorrow to lift.)

    Heather, when we meet with a dismissive attitude from a health care person who is supposed to help us to deal with our struggles--it can be extremely discouraging.

    Fortunately there are fewer of these persons than ever before. Dear friend--there are people who are speaking out and making their experiences with Fibro and CFS known and better understood. This is another major reason why this forum of sharing is so important!

    Please know your experiences are real--and not due only to depression. For instance, viruses that play a big role in these syndromes can be found to be present in our blood through more sophisticated tests. And other laboratory tests are now becoming refined enough to discern more of the physiological processes going on.

    BTW..I'm agreeing that depression, as a major factor, can become extreme and seriously disabling, in and of itself. But, I do not agree that depression alone accounts for these disease processes.

    I agree that sooner, rather than later, you'll find a doctor who is better informed and more willing to 'hang in there' with you and give you the appropriate and effective treatment you need to maximize the quality of your life.

    Keep looking until you find someone who treats you with the caring respect you deserve, as we all deserve!

    With love, Dorothy