Dietary Info On FM

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by herblady, Oct 1, 2002.

  1. herblady

    herblady New Member

    there may be something to this. i hardly ever eat meat and don't get enough protein. this is an exerpt from an article written by John W. Cartmell, LMP. check it out. cindi



    A proper diet is essential to maintain normal health and wellness. If the diet is insufficient to support health, the person will not be optimally well. Protein is one of many nutrients needed in a properly balanced diet for normal growth and maintenance. Proteins make up 10-20% of the mass of most cells and tissues, and provide for many of the functions and physical structure of cells, organs and tissues. Globular proteins, composed of one or more proteins, perform specific functions as enzymes, certain hormones, antibodies, and protein transport complexes, all needed for the normal operation of the body.2, 3, 8 If protein intake, digestion or assimilation is insufficient to maintain normal tissues and functions, then degenerative changes and tissue abnormalities result.2

    Dietary proteins must be broken down by digestion into individual amino acids. The first stage of digestion occurs in the stomach where hydrochloric acid activates pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down large complexes of protein into smaller sized proteins. Pancreatic and intestinal enzymes then complete the digestion of proteins into individual amino acids that can be absorbed into the blood and reassembled by the body into the various body tissues.2 How these amino acids are assembled into proteins, determines the structure and function of specific proteins and tissues.

    Body proteins are composed of different combinations of twenty amino acids. Half of these amino acids can be synthesized by the body, but the other half are considered essential amino acids because they must be obtained from the diet.2 Dietary proteins are classified as complete or incomplete, based on the amounts of essential amino acids they contain and provide. Animal-derived proteins like milk, meat, fish, poultry and eggs contain good amounts of all essential amino acids and are therefore considered complete. Vegetable proteins are generally considered incomplete because the amounts or availability of certain essential amino acids are inadequate to support normal tissue growth or maintenance. Vegetable proteins are usually combined, or animal protein included, to ensure the diet has sufficient amounts of all essential amino acids.2

    Skeletal muscle is highly specialized tissue. The complexity of a muscle cell's structure coincides with its unique specialized function of contractibility, the result of an elaborate system of multiple protein interactions. The two primary types of proteins in a muscle cell, actin and myosin, are complexes of proteins with smaller specialized protein components. Essential amino acids make up approximately 38% of the individual protein components in Actin and Myosin, and 50% of the structure of myoglobin, a type of "muscle" hemoglobin.9, 10, 8 By comparison, the protein fibers that make up collagen, a general fibrous protein, are composed of approximately 20% essential amino acids.12, 13 It's not surprising that soft-tissue degeneration and ill health result when protein ingestion, digestion or assimilation are deficient.

    Both fibromyalgia and MPS may be related to protein deficiency. If the availability of essential amino acids is insufficient to adequately maintain or repair muscle tissue, then collagen may be the body's best alternative for providing structural support in spite of a loss of normal muscle structure and function. The irritation, stiffness and pain associated with trigger points in fibromyalgia and MPS may be the result of structural abnormalities resulting from the replacement of one tissue type with another. Indeed, the 18 tender points used to diagnose fibromyalgia are located precisely in areas where muscles and myofascial tissues merge one into another, where collagen based myofascial tissue, with it's lower content of essential amino acids, may increase disproportionately during times of protein insufficiency.

  2. herblady

    herblady New Member

    there may be something to this. i hardly ever eat meat and don't get enough protein. this is an exerpt from an article written by John W. Cartmell, LMP. check it out. cindi



    A proper diet is essential to maintain normal health and wellness. If the diet is insufficient to support health, the person will not be optimally well. Protein is one of many nutrients needed in a properly balanced diet for normal growth and maintenance. Proteins make up 10-20% of the mass of most cells and tissues, and provide for many of the functions and physical structure of cells, organs and tissues. Globular proteins, composed of one or more proteins, perform specific functions as enzymes, certain hormones, antibodies, and protein transport complexes, all needed for the normal operation of the body.2, 3, 8 If protein intake, digestion or assimilation is insufficient to maintain normal tissues and functions, then degenerative changes and tissue abnormalities result.2

    Dietary proteins must be broken down by digestion into individual amino acids. The first stage of digestion occurs in the stomach where hydrochloric acid activates pepsin, an enzyme that breaks down large complexes of protein into smaller sized proteins. Pancreatic and intestinal enzymes then complete the digestion of proteins into individual amino acids that can be absorbed into the blood and reassembled by the body into the various body tissues.2 How these amino acids are assembled into proteins, determines the structure and function of specific proteins and tissues.

    Body proteins are composed of different combinations of twenty amino acids. Half of these amino acids can be synthesized by the body, but the other half are considered essential amino acids because they must be obtained from the diet.2 Dietary proteins are classified as complete or incomplete, based on the amounts of essential amino acids they contain and provide. Animal-derived proteins like milk, meat, fish, poultry and eggs contain good amounts of all essential amino acids and are therefore considered complete. Vegetable proteins are generally considered incomplete because the amounts or availability of certain essential amino acids are inadequate to support normal tissue growth or maintenance. Vegetable proteins are usually combined, or animal protein included, to ensure the diet has sufficient amounts of all essential amino acids.2

    Skeletal muscle is highly specialized tissue. The complexity of a muscle cell's structure coincides with its unique specialized function of contractibility, the result of an elaborate system of multiple protein interactions. The two primary types of proteins in a muscle cell, actin and myosin, are complexes of proteins with smaller specialized protein components. Essential amino acids make up approximately 38% of the individual protein components in Actin and Myosin, and 50% of the structure of myoglobin, a type of "muscle" hemoglobin.9, 10, 8 By comparison, the protein fibers that make up collagen, a general fibrous protein, are composed of approximately 20% essential amino acids.12, 13 It's not surprising that soft-tissue degeneration and ill health result when protein ingestion, digestion or assimilation are deficient.

    Both fibromyalgia and MPS may be related to protein deficiency. If the availability of essential amino acids is insufficient to adequately maintain or repair muscle tissue, then collagen may be the body's best alternative for providing structural support in spite of a loss of normal muscle structure and function. The irritation, stiffness and pain associated with trigger points in fibromyalgia and MPS may be the result of structural abnormalities resulting from the replacement of one tissue type with another. Indeed, the 18 tender points used to diagnose fibromyalgia are located precisely in areas where muscles and myofascial tissues merge one into another, where collagen based myofascial tissue, with it's lower content of essential amino acids, may increase disproportionately during times of protein insufficiency.

  3. totteacher

    totteacher New Member

    Hi cindi

    Thank you for sharing that. Is the rest of the article here in the library? I would like to read the whole thing. Getting more protein in my diet is something that I have been working on. I am not alergic to milk products so I have been trying to eat more cottage cheese. The fat-free type gives you 13 gm. of protein for just a half cup. I haven't looked at protein supplements yet but I might.


    Thanks again!

    Linda
  4. herblady

    herblady New Member

    i don't think it's in the library here. you'll have to email me to get the site. yucca_dew@yahoo.com. cindi
  5. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Great article. Perhaps this is why we do better on a high protien diet. BTW, for veggitarians, the combo of corn and beans provides a more complete amino acid array than any other combination of veggies.

    In the last two or three years, since I've gotten sicker, I have had meat cravings. When I was still working in outside sales, I knew where all the Burger Kings were in the area so I could get a "fix" when a craving hit.

    Cindi, could you give enough info (key words) so that we can easily find the website with our search engines?

    Love, Mikie
  6. herblady

    herblady New Member

    i'll have to go back to google. the name has seeped out of a hole in my swiss cheese brain, lol. cindi
  7. Kiwigirl

    Kiwigirl New Member

    I have had incresed pain in my tender points and I am sure that this is because I have not been having my protein shakes in the mornings lately. Six months ago I had many days when I couldn't get out of bed...since going on the 'zone' diet (high protein in the right proportion with carbs and fats) I am now looking for a full time job.

    As well as the foods that I eat, I also top up my system with a good cardio-vascular multi (said to be beneficial to those with immune disorders), Omega-3, Glucosamine with MSM, Fibrodol (similar to your ZMA...contains magnesium and malic acid), Thyroxine (for underactive thyroid) and a 10mg dose of Amitriptylene.

    In conjuction with these, I have started Yoga (great stress management tool) and long walks....for someone who used to ride a bike for about 12 miles each day, this is a step down but I'm getting there. I have just started to ride a bike again and with summer coming before long I'll be doing 5 miles on it.

    Bottom line.....high protein diet has really helped me with my pain and energy levels....this has to be in conjunction with the right amounts of carbohydrate and 'good' fats. I know this won't work for everyone, but in the last 6 months, I have changed from a person who wanted to end it all, to a person who is starting to look forward to the best years of my life.
  8. touchback

    touchback New Member

    You can access my paper on Fibromyalgia directly at dietadvisor.

    I'm currently working on a thesis on protein nutrition and fibromyalgia. I'll try to remember to post a notice in this forum when it's published, or send me an email and I'll send you a link to it when I post it.

    John Cartmell, LMP
    dietadvisor.com
  9. AnnetteP

    AnnetteP New Member

    Thanks for posting your site. Unfortunately, its likely to be removed, only because this site's rules are such that web addresses can't be posted :( I don't make the rules.....and I'd like to say I just follow them, but I break them too, occasionally lol. But, I just wanted to tell everyone (should your web address be edited out) to do an internet search using your full name. I did that and easily found your website. It looks very interesting, even though I don't have FM, but only CFS and a few other things like Lupus. I also benefitted greatly from a high protein diet.

    Annette

[ advertisement ]