Does it sound like I might have Fibrom or Chronic Fat Syndrome?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by lisais47, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. lisais47

    lisais47 New Member

    Sorry I'v no idea what the icon means all I know I've bipolar and I'm depressed daily.

    There's but a few hours ea day I actually feel good.
    I'm tired allot.

    Fatigue will come on me suddenly and then I have to go right to bed. I don't know what I'd do if I had a job to go to.

    If I take a 30 sometimes 45 and especially if I would walk an hour, or do laundry or do even just 1 heavy duty (or not even that hard) chore I tire easily and fatigued comes on me strong/suddenly so I have to go to bed. Then I'm up till 3am or earlier. Then I must sleep until 2 or 3pm the next day.

    I've overactive bladder and must get up 5, 6 or more times per night even with the generic medication I take.

    For nigh on 2 yrs a doc prescribed me migraine headache medication Maxalt 10 mg and I wasn't warned of danger to heart capalaries (or something). I was taking up to 15 per month with frequent headaches. I also got tmj pain in upper teeth/gums at same time. He was not my regular doc but she wasn't prescribing me pills to take care of the terrible pain so I went to this other doc a few times
    Emergency room doctors told me I was taking 2 much Maxalt and the last doc told me I couldn't be having migraines.

    So it's tension headaches I have. My reg doc put me on Depakote for mood swings. I also take 50mg Trazadone.

    The Depakote has decreased my headaches very much.

    The past month I been seeing a new doc my reg doc referred me to. He gave me similar med to Maxalt.
    I told him I took 4 of the new meds called Relpax 40mg and he said it was to much. 4 tabs for 4 headaches throughout the past month

    I get very little done daily. I'm lucky if I can fix food for my bf and my son and do a little cleaning.

    And I am so depressed with my life. My life is very much the same daily and there's is no fun like getting to go out of town.

    I feel like such a loser. I feel so worthless.

    I wish I could have had a career but that path never worked out for me and obs never worked out for me.

    Does it sound like I have either of these conditions;
    Fibromalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome?

    thanks for all comments, will be appreciated

  2. PVLady

    PVLady New Member

    Normally before you receive a diagnosis of fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue, the doctor must rule out any other cause for your symptoms.

    Your medications can have side effects that cause symptoms. Below is info on Trazadone. (I would also check on your others meds). I could not take Trazadone - it made me sick.


    Side effects Trazadone:

    While you are taking trazodone you may need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression and/ or suicidal thoughts at the start of therapy or when doses are changed.

    This concern about the increased risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors may be greater if you are 18 years of age or younger and are taking trazodone.

    In patients younger than 18 years, the period of risk may extend beyond start of therapy or when doses are changed. Your doctor may want you to monitor for the following symptoms: anxiety, panic attacks, difficulty sleeping, irritability, hostility, impulsivity, severe restlessness, and mania (mental and/ or physical hyperactivity).

    These symptoms may be associated with the development of worsening symptoms of depression and/ or suicidal thoughts or actions. Contact your physician if you develop any new or worsening mental health symptoms during treatment with trazodone. Do not stop taking trazodone.



    Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Trazodone may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.



    Dizziness may be more likely to occur when you rise from a sitting or lying position. Rise slowly to prevent dizziness and a possible fall.



    Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking trazodone.



    Stop taking trazodone and call your doctor immediately if you experience a prolonged (4 hours or longer), painful, or inappropriate erection. This could lead to a serious condition requiring surgery.



    Do not stop taking trazodone without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. It may be several weeks before your symptoms begin to improve, and you may require continuous treatment for quite some time.






    While you are taking trazodone you may need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression and/ or suicidal thoughts at the start of therapy or when doses are changed. This concern about the increased risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors may be greater if you are 18 years of age or younger and are taking trazodone.

    In patients younger than 18 years, the period of risk may extend beyond start of therapy or when doses are changed. Your doctor may want you to monitor for the following symptoms: anxiety, panic attacks, difficulty sleeping, irritability, hostility, impulsivity, severe restlessness, and mania (mental and/ or physical hyperactivity).

    These symptoms may be associated with the development of worsening symptoms of depression and/ or suicidal thoughts or actions. Contact your healthcare provider if you develop any new or worsening mental health symptoms during treatment with trazodone. Do not stop taking trazodone.



    Trazodone should not be taken during the initial recovery phase after a heart attack. Talk to your doctor before taking trazodone if you have had a heart attack. You may also require special monitoring during treatment if you have any other types of heart disease, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, or chest pain (angina).



    Stop taking trazodone and call your doctor immediately if you experience a prolonged (4 hours or longer), painful, or inappropriate erection. This could lead to a serious condition requiring surgery.



    Trazodone is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether trazodone will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take this medication without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.



    It is not known whether trazodone passes into breast milk. Do not take trazodone without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.





    Take trazodone exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain the instructions to you.



    Take each dose with a full glass of water.



    Take trazodone with a meal or a light snack. Food increases the amount of medicine that is absorbed by the body and it may help to decrease dizziness.



    It is important to take trazodone regularly to get the most benefit.



    Do not stop taking trazodone without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. It may be several weeks before your symptoms begin to improve, and you may require continuous treatment for quite some time.



    Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with trazodone to monitor progress and side effects.



    Store trazodone at room temperature away from moisture and heat.





    Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next regularly scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next one as directed. Do not take a double dose of this medication.





    Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected.



    Symptoms of a trazodone overdose include drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, seizures, an irregular heart beat, difficulty breathing, painful erection, and death.





    Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Trazodone may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.



    Dizziness may be more likely to occur when you rise from a sitting or lying position. Rise slowly to prevent dizziness and a possible fall.



    Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while taking trazodone.





    If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking trazodone and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:



    • an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);


    • a prolonged (4 hours or longer), painful, or inappropriate erection;


    • an irregular heartbeat or chest pains.




    Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take trazodone and talk to your doctor if you experience



    • dizziness or drowsiness;


    • headache;


    • insomnia or vivid dreams;


    • dry mouth, upset stomach, nausea, or vomiting;


    • diarrhea or constipation;


    • tremors (shaking);


    • blurred vision.




    Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.





    Before taking trazodone, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medications:



    • digoxin (Lanoxin, Lanoxicaps);


    • phenytoin (Dilantin);


    • a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), or tranylcypromine (Parnate);


    • warfarin (Coumadin).




    You may not be able to take trazodone, or you may require special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above.



    Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with trazodone. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products.



    Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed












    [This Message was Edited on 04/20/2007]
  3. pat460

    pat460 New Member

    Sorry you're having such a hard time of it. Just remember there is always a brighter day ahead.

    Your symptoms do sound very familiar but they can be caused by other conditions as well. You sound like you are suffering from some depression but, if you do have either of these conditions, that isn't unusual. You need a doctor to help you sort this out. Not just any doctor though, you will have to find one who believes FM and CFS exists. A lot of doctors don't you know. Only a doctor can diagnose you but if you look up the symptoms of FM/CFS and compare them to your own, you can at least get an idea whether or not you have either one. Remember that fibromyalgia comes with widespread body pain--that's why I'm replying to you at 4:00 in the morning. The pain woke me up.

    You might want to look into starting a good energy promoting vitamin in the meantime. Everyone these days can benefit from some extra vitamins in their diet. Also, try to eat as healthy as you can. No matter what you have going on in your body, some extra help to aid your body in healing itself is in order.

    I hope you find some answers soon. I know how frustrating it can be to feel like you can't put one foot in front of the other but have no idea why. It is not laziness--you have something going on in your body and don't forget that or let anyone tell you otherwise. Keep searching for answers!

    Pat