Dr. Craig on Fasting For Better Health in Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by RadioFM, Apr 23, 2015.

  1. RadioFM

    RadioFM Active Member

    "Intermittent fasting has been crucial in my long-lasting CFS recovery. – Dr. Courtney Craig The pleasure of eating good tasting food is undeniable, but food can have a dark side for people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM). "

    Could avoiding it at times help with ME/CFS and FM?

    "Digesting food, for one thing, takes work – lots of it. In energy-depleted disorders like ME/CFS and FM the energy that goes into digestion could conceivably have been used for healing. If you have blood volume issues, eating can cause your blood to rush to your stomach leaving you depleted elsewhere. "

    "The cramping, bloating and other gut issues common in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS take their toll as well. Dr. Cheney once wryly said that if only ME/CFS patients didn’t have to eat they would get a lot better. "

    "Eating small meals is definitely the way to go for many people with these disorders, but what about occasionally cutting out meals altogether? Would that help? "

    "Dr. Craig on Fasting Dr. Courtney Craig, D.C., a former Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patient, asserted in a recent blog “Cellular Spring Cleaning: Intermittent Fasting for CFS” that it can. In fact she found that intermittent fasting helped her avoid relapses and stated it has been ‘crucial’ in her long term recovery. "

    That got my attention.

    "I’ve tried fasting before. It definitely helped before it wiped me out, but Dr. Craig’s fasts are nothing like the fasts I tried. Her quickie ‘made for ME/CFS and FM’ type fasts last 8-12 hours and start after an early dinner and end with a late breakfast around noon. Fasting while you sleep is an idea I can get my head around. "

    "Instead of doing them for days, you do short fasts once or twice a week. I’m definitely going to give them a try. Fasting fits my favorite criteria for treatments: it’s cheap – in fact, you save money doing it – and you can do it from home. Dr. Craig warns that people with uncontrolled hypoglycemia, adrenal fatigue, or thyroid problems could have problems with intermittent fasting. "

    "I was eager to learn more. Dr. Courtney Craig (DC) on Intermittent Fasting in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Simply by avoiding meals for 12-18 hours periodically I have been able to stave off relapse and even “bad days.” – Dr. Courtney Craig The Nitty Gritty – Doing the Fast When do you know if should break a fast? I have heard of fasters having to go through a kind of rough period before their body adjusts, but are there any signs that signal it’s time to cut short a fast even if you haven’t gotten to the 8-12 hour mark? "

    What if you’re feeling great at noon the next day?

    "Your energy is up and your desire for food is gone – what about continuing further? I can’t stress this enough: I don’t recommend intermittent fasting until the individual has switched over to a low carbohydrate, nutrient-dense diet for at least 3 months or longer. It is vital to first stabilize blood sugar (insulin) and leptin levels. Otherwise, fasts for 8-18+ hours will feel like starvation and can seriously tax already fatigued adrenal glands and disrupt normal thyroid function. glasses of water."

    "It’s important to keep well-hydrated when you’re fasting It is also vital to continue to drink water while fasting. Those with POTS or hypotension may also need to replenish electrolytes. Fasting is very much an individual experience where some will be able to go for longer periods than others. If you can’t fast for 24 hours, 14-16 hours may still have a beneficial effect."

    "It’s important to just be aware of how you feel while fasting, take in adequate liquids, and not exceed your limits. Monitoring blood pressure may also be a good idea during fasts. I encourage working closely with a nutritionist or clinician who is familiar with intermittent fasting. When should you break the fast? A good rule of thumb in my opinion is to only eat when you’re hungry. Hunger hormones like leptin and ghrelin tightly regulate appetite. However, in individuals who eat a high carbohydrate diet (standard American diet) leptin resistance can occur. Blood sugar quickly drops with leptin resistance resulting in hypoglycemia and severe hunger pangs. "

    What about that last dinner? Should it consist of extra protein?

    "An early dinner that is low in carbohydrates (primarily coming from vegetables) with moderate protein and high in healthy fat is my usual dinner. Loading up on carbohydrates before a fast may seem like the logical thing to do since carbs are stored as glycogen (similar to how athletes carb-load before a race), but this defeats the purpose of the entire fast. "

    "In order to get the cellular benefits of fasting, one must deplete glycogen stores and burn fat as fuel through a process known as ketosis. Insulin needs to be kept very, very low to promote the creation of ATP from fats and not glucose. butter Sometimes it does go better with butter … Ketosis can be measured easily using urine test strips to look for ketone bodies. One ketone in particular, β-hydroxybutyrate, is beneficial to mitochondria. "

    Read more:
    Dr. Craig on Fasting For Better Health in Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome http://www.cortjohnson.org/blog/201...health-fibromyalgia-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

    Dr. Courtney Craig D.C.

    "First diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome at age 16, Dr. Craig D.C. spent her academic career trying to understand and overcome the illness. Using both conventional allopathic medicine and integrative medicine she was finally able to recover. "

    "A chiropracter and nutritionist, Dr. Craig uses dietary changes and personalized supplementation to support ME/CFS and FM patients in their return to health."

    "Find out more about Dr. Craig here and visit her website and sign up for her blog here."

    Dr. Craigs’ Blogs on Health Rising