first hydrotherapy session on wednesday......

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by sybil, Oct 17, 2002.

  1. sybil

    sybil New Member

    ever since i have been in terrible pain.
    i did expect to be sore,but nothing approaching how bad i am.yesterday i was in so much pain,i was physically sick.

    the other ladies with FM who had the therapy with me weren't very encouraging.most of them had been having hydro for over 12 months,they still had to give up their jobs and haven't really had much improvement.the only reason they still have the therapy,is they haven't been offered any other form of treatment,apart from painkillers and Amitriptyline,which i have just stopped taking because of the side effects!!

    i wanted to return to work,but if it takes me until the next session,to get over the last one,i'm not going to be able to work....i'm so fed up now,

    sybilxxx
  2. sybil

    sybil New Member

    ever since i have been in terrible pain.
    i did expect to be sore,but nothing approaching how bad i am.yesterday i was in so much pain,i was physically sick.

    the other ladies with FM who had the therapy with me weren't very encouraging.most of them had been having hydro for over 12 months,they still had to give up their jobs and haven't really had much improvement.the only reason they still have the therapy,is they haven't been offered any other form of treatment,apart from painkillers and Amitriptyline,which i have just stopped taking because of the side effects!!

    i wanted to return to work,but if it takes me until the next session,to get over the last one,i'm not going to be able to work....i'm so fed up now,

    sybilxxx
  3. janehutch

    janehutch New Member

    Hydrotherapy or water aerobics isn't going to produce great rewards immediately...and it is no cure, but it is no-impact and therefore helps keep the joints and muscles flexible. I do water therapy 3-4 times a week and still, I know if I've overdone it with a particular group of muscles. You may never be able to go back to work...but getting this exercise might help you to live a better quality life each day.
    Janehutch
  4. sybil

    sybil New Member

    after hydro...i just didn't expect to feel so bad i wanted to vomit.
    the exercises didn't seem demanding,but i'm not doing half as many next time.

    hi Barb! good news for you,hope it goes well!
    you can swim a bit at the end of the session,if you choose.but most people don't,or can't!
    i tried a few strokes,just from curiosity,it appears i don't have the strength anymore.just think,i used to be the school swimming champion!
    i had the indignity of having to be winched out of the pool in a special chair,my arms didn't have the strength to haul myself out of the water!
    got a walking stick today,nearly fell over in town again.i resisted having a stick,but i'll hurt myself soon.my balance is terrible.
    i'm looking for pink glittery paint to paint my stick with!

    sybilxxx
  5. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

    I have CFS and FMS. I've been in Aqua-therapy, and I've been on a regular exercise program. Here's what I have learned, so far...

    Aqua-therapy should be done in a pool or tank which is heated to 83-86 degrees. The boyancy and heat are optimum for low-impact exercise.

    Whatever the exercise, it should be supported with some combination of massage, chiropractic care, electrical stimulation, ultra-sound, infra-sound, heat, stretching, accupuncture, AND adequite pain medications.

    Last year, I was in aqua-therapy. I had no other therapies. The doctors sent me home, and back to work, with only Ibuprophen. This only drained what little energy I had, and pushed my pain level to 9-10. My life was hell.

    I currently go to traditional physical therapy three times a week. I ride a bicycle and lift weights. However, I have the benefit of all the therapies, above, except accupuncture. On physical therapy days, I take vicodin, upon returning home, and again, before going to bed. I still have pain, but it is less than it was before physical therapy, and my strength and balance have improved, as well.

    So, I would recommend exercise, and I would recommend starting in an aqua-therapy program, if there is one in your area. But you have to have these other therapies, or you will be in a world of hurt. Any doctor that tells you that exercise alone will help you, is both ignorant of our disease, and incompetent in his profession.

    Hope this helps. Kelly
  6. sybil

    sybil New Member

    i live in the u.k. our NHS service doesn't have all the therapies you mention on demand and i can't afford to pay for them,as i am on a quarter of my normal pay,due to being off work for 5 months .all i have been offered is hydro and i had to fight to get that and the pool is heated to the levels you mentioned.i live in a tiny village,there is only 1 large hospital and 1 small one serving a large rural community.the waiting lists for any type of physio are usually about 2 months at least!!
    i think all you people in the U.S don't realise the realities of healthcare in the U.K.we don't have the same access to the drugs you have,it's all down to money and the NHS doesn't have money for cancer patients,so us FMS sufferers are way down on the list of priorities.
    the NHS is short of doctors and nurses,we import them from other countries.our G.P.waiting lists are full,because no one wants to be a G.P. anymore.
    we are a western country with 3rd world healthcare.

    as for bike riding,i can barely walk!!

    sybilxxx
    [This Message was Edited on 10/18/2002]
    [This Message was Edited on 10/18/2002]
  7. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

    So sorry to hear how little health care you have access to. That's like our HMO's are here. I had to change health plans, this year, because I wasn't getting any health care, either.

    In that case, I would recommend that you first insist on adequite pain medication. Don't let your doctor push you around. The truth is that only one percent of patients receiving pain medication ever become addicted. The risk of addiction is extremely low.

    Heat you can get in the form of baths, showers, or hot packs. But, use ice for cramps - not heat. Heat only increases cramping. I learned this from my aqua-therapist.

    Do all of the stretching that you can manage on your own. Tight muscles hurt more than loose ones.

    Use a massager, or get someone to give you some massage. Here's something that sounds goofy, but it works for me... My daughter rolls a rolling pin (yeah, the kind you use to roll out cookie dough) across my knots/trigger points, until they release. This doesn't get them all, but it works pretty well on the places the roller can reach.

    I hope this helps. Kelly
  8. sybil

    sybil New Member

    co-codamol for pain,but only at night.you are only supposed to take up to 8 in a 24 hour period.as they contain paracetamol that can accumulate in the liver,i certainly don't want to exceed the dosage.if i take to many of them,i get stomach problems.my doctor has never suggested any other type of pain meds,but then again,he never suggests anything!
    i'm still in far too much pain from the last session to attempt any further stretching exercises of my upper body,especially as i have my next hydro session tomorrow.

    that rolling pin thing sounds scary,i think that would really hurt me,i have osteoarthritis in my spine and my back is always quite sore,even without the FMS,

    sybilxxx
  9. Wuame

    Wuame New Member

    Sybil I feel for you. I live in a fairly isolated area but do have a small fitness center with a (usually) adequately heated pool I use. My medicenes are pretty well covered by insurance, and proper balanced meds, as some have already said, are important. But my hydrotherapy (water aerobics), massage therapy, all those things that would be good preventive or maintenence care, are not covered, tho my doctor (who fortunately is a very good chronic pain specialist--at last I found one!), has continued sending in prescriptions for them. Drugs are fine if they help (and mine do) but I'd rather be able to cut them back and focus more on body care like aerobics, massage, etc. Meanwhile, I'm on job disability, tho I work a (very) little. Must confess your situation sounds even worse, tho. Health care systems--sometimes they're enuf to make you sick! :(

    I am able to teach a few water aerobics classes weekly, which gets me a few bucks, free membership, most of my exercise, and an opportunity to help others like myself who can't stand the pounding of "land" exercises.

    Still there have been times I could hardly stand it. I'd have to go very lightly & skip some things, have a class member take over, sometimes not even make it. But its improved as I've kept at it. It's also been important for me to spend some time in a hot tub (at the fitness center or a hot bath at home), to at least do stretching at home (like deskercise or something) daily, eat healthy & sparingly, make some sacrifices & get massage, and try hard as it is sometimes, to have a healthy attitude, and find things to do to keep my mind off the pain.

    Like you, I usually can do very little even casual walking without pain, but I try to take some short walks with my wife when the weather is not too hot or cold. Tai Chi or Yoga is also supposed to be helpful, but after a few classes Tai Chi was still bothering my arms too much, tho I may try again.

    I guess the key is everybody's different, and FM can do so many different things to different people at different times. In my water aerobics classes, I always tell people to go at their own pace, to do the exercises slowly & with the proper posture, breathing & movements, rather than trying to get in as many reps as possible or keep up with someone else. Becuz everyone has their own pace; mine changes from day to day too.

    Also I tell people "Know your limits, stretch your limits." In other words, you want to be able to do more & gain more flexibility; and I have, so have my regular class members. But you don't want to try to do too much too fast. And I try to help people admit & accept it if there are certain exercises they can't do becuz of a condition or a joint or something--maybe never. We find find something else similar that they can do.

    Water aerobics are great in that they both protect you & yet actually give you more resistance than most land exercises, as well as toning & shaping you like being on land can't. But you still have to move, and sometimes when FM is really bad that's about all it takes!

    So do take care of yourself, do as much of whatever is good for you that you can. And you might want to consider, if possible, trying to find a doctor that knows a bit more about FM and has some help to offer you. If you can't, it comes down to mostly doctoring yourself, and getting what help from books the net & other people you can--that was really all I had for years, as what docs I had were clueless about what I had.

    Sybil don't push yourself, just take good gentle care.

    Wuame