FLYING- HAS IT EVER

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by CATLADY912, Apr 12, 2003.

  1. CATLADY912

    CATLADY912 New Member

    AFFECTED YOUR FIBRO IN ANYWAY?? I WAS WONDERING IF BEING IN A HIGH ATTITUDE WOULD AFFECT THE FIBRO IF I TOOK AN AIRPLANE TRIP FOR A 2 HOUR RIDE SOMEWHERE. THANKS FOR ANY INFO. HAVE A GREAT DAY.

    SOFT HUGS.
    JANICE
  2. CATLADY912

    CATLADY912 New Member

    ANOTHER THINGS, DOES ANYONE THINK OF THE SARS SCARE WHEN IT COMES TO FLYING??



    JANICE
  3. j9miller

    j9miller New Member

    and I did feel worse for a couple of days. The air in the planes is recycled so that has something to do with it I am told by many flight attendants. One even said he refuses to fly the 757's because they have the worst air quality. The tight squeeze plays a roll so you need to move about if you can. Frowned on by some because of terrorist watch, so let attendant know why you need to stretch more often. Rest up, drink lots of fluids and take your meds. Take care.

    Janine
  4. layinglow

    layinglow New Member

    I was really hoping to vacation this year, with husband and children. I am wanting to go home, and then spend about 2 weeks in the wilderness. The drive from Texas to my home in Michigan is about 24 hours. I don't think I could do this with the fm/cfs. I thought about flying, and shipping our camping gear. To be totally honest with you, I have not followed through, as I am concerned with SARS, and terrorism. We would have to fly in to O'Hare in Chicago, one of the busiest airports in the country. I am not sure I am willing to take that risk. I am more fearful of SARS, and as was mentioned before, the low quality air, and close confinement onboard. Other members in my family are now exhibiting some symptoms of this disorder, and I think it would be a risk.
    LL
  5. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Even though planes are pressurized, the air inside at altitude is thinner and we do not get as much oxygen as we would at ground level. Couple this with being in a cramped space, and you have the ingredients for a Fibro flare. I got one at Thanksgiving just flying up to Atlanta, about a 1 1/2 hr. flight.

    Ask for bulkhead seats if you can get them so you can stretch your legs out in front of you. Next best thing is an exit row, but be sure you are strong enough to open the door and help others before requesting this. Even in a tight coach seat, you can stretch and flex your legs a little. Get up and walk up and down the aisle when you can. An aisle seat makes this easier.

    Try to fly a newer plane like the 717's. They have exchange of air all the time and not just recycled stale air. Every once in a while, take a couple of deep breaths, exhaling against pressure from pursed lips very slowly. This helps oxygenate your body. If you do get what feels like a cramp or pain in your leg, do not rub it. If it persists, see a doc as it could be a blood clot like the one which killed David Bloom, the NBC reporter in Iraq.

    If you have some kind of mileage plan, use it to upgrade to Business Class or First Class on long flights instead of using the miles for free tickets. There are usually empty First Class seats available for upgrades. If the airline bumps you and gives you free tickets, also aske them to fly you First Class on the next flight they are putting you on. Explain your illness and how this will be difficult for you physically. Speak to a supervisor if necessary.

    Good luck on your flight.

    Love, Mikie