FM -- high or low WBC count?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by ume, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. ume

    ume New Member

    Hi Folks,

    I'd like to ask some questions for my friend.I have CFIDS, not FM, and she probably has FM (has many of the symptoms but FM is not understood here in Japan and so she has not been diagnosed).

    She got some test results back she is confused about. Any comments very much appreciated. I know you are not doctors (well, most of you <grin>), but so many here have studied up on all aspects of these illnesses.

    She has high WBC count -- 11.5 and 4 -8 is normal

    Also, CRP, which shows infection is -- 3, normal is 0 -0.5

    1.) Does this ring true for those of you with FM?

    She took blood tests to rule out Rheumatoid Arthritis and thyroid (she's been very tired and has arthritis like pain).


    2.) She found a recent study which shows that women over 50 with BOTH high WBC counts and high CRP are indicative of 7 times more liklihood of having a heart attack or stroke. She has a family history of heart attacks. Could this be it?

    3.) lastly, her dr. who doesn'T know squat about FM or IBS or Meniere's (which she has), wants to just put her on antibiotics because she is clearly fighting an infection. This sounds irresponsible to me, without knowing just what is causing her results. What do you think?

    Sorry this is long. Any comments or ideas greatly appreciated. And/Or -- any ideas on what further tests she might go back and ask for?

    Thanks,

    Ume
  2. CherLyn817

    CherLyn817 New Member

    My doc told me that if my WBC is over 9 then it's a sure sign of FMS, but there are also a ton of other blood tests that the doc should take on your friend before he rules in favor of FMS.

    Now I had to go back and check my blood work to see what my doc did on me before he gave me the DX of FMS (these tests might be different for your friend). Your friend's doc needs to do a CBC (complete blood count); ESR (sedimentation rate), glucose, BUN and creatinine (kidney check), bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase (to check for liver and bone diseases), albumin (protein), calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and uric acid levels.

    By doing full blood work your friend's doc will be able to level the field and figure out what is really going on with her body. Generally when they check for FMS they do blood work as well as check the 18 points of FMS. My blood work showed a high WBC, but when she checked my 18 points, she had no doubt in her mind that I had FMS. Also, the fact that I had the symptoms for more then three months had helped her with her DX for me.

    ~Cher
    PS. Maybe your friends doc should pick up the new "Complete Idiot's Guide to Fibromyalgia." Sounds like he could use a little "brush up" on his medical education ... lol.
    [This Message was Edited on 08/05/2005]
  3. willwork4shoes

    willwork4shoes New Member

    I recently went to the doc and was told that I had both a viral and bacterial infection - but my WBC was 7.5. Evidently my body had decided not to put out any white blood cells to fight the infection. I went through two rounds of antibiotics and got the infection under control although now it feels like it is back.

    I think we're all different. Our immune systems are impaired either by the FMS or by what causes it.

    Hugs,
    Will
  4. ume

    ume New Member

    Cher -- thanks for going back and looking up things for me to tell my friend. I appreciate it. Who knows what they can do here, but it is a place to start.

    Will -- interesting that your WBC count was not up.

    Thank you both for taking the time to reply.

    Hugs,

    Ume

  5. ume

    ume New Member

    BUMP

    Just to see if anyone else has any comment?

    ume
  6. oldcowhand

    oldcowhand New Member

    I have carried a high white blood count for over 20 yrs ( between 12,000 & 21,000). I have went to a lot of docs & none have been able to find out my problem. I do have FM & MVP.My biggest symptom is being tired all the time. anyone else out there with the same problem?

    oldcowhand
  7. mbofov

    mbofov Active Member

    I've had a low WBC count for several years. Doctors don't know why and say don't worry, although I am prone to sinus and strep infections and have a very difficult time getting over them without antibiotics.
  8. pepper

    pepper New Member

    I have had a low wbc for over 22 yrs and the doctors don't know why just like mbofov. I have leukopenia (low leukocytes) and neutropenia (low neutrophils I think). I get a lot of sinus infections and have to take antibiotics more often than I would like.

    Pepper
  9. suz9601

    suz9601 Member

    MIne goes from barely in normal range to below normal range. it alternates about every other time it is the opposite of what is was before. Docs dont seem concerned, but I am. NOt sure what the deal is. It never gets over 4.2, if it does I am really sick.
  10. fibromaster

    fibromaster New Member

    Any infection or acute stress results in increased production of WBCs. This usually entails an increased numbers of cells and an increase in the percent of immature cells (mainly band cells) in the blood. High WBC counts may indicate the presence of an inflammatory and immune response, or it may result from other conditions such as leukemia.

    It is important to realize that an abnormal increase in one type of leukocyte can produce an apparent decrease in the percentage of other types.

    An increased percentage of neutrophils may indicate:
    Acute infection
    Eclampsia
    Gout
    Myelocytic leukemia
    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Rheumatic fever
    Acute stress
    Thyroiditis
    Trauma

    A decreased percentage of neutrophils may indicate:
    Aplastic anemia
    Chemotherapy
    Influenza
    Overwhelming bacterial infection
    Radiation therapy
    http://health.allrefer.com/health/blood-differential-results.html

    Neutrophil
    Neutrophils are Leukocytes (white blood cells) of the Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte subgroup.

    Neutrophils form a primary defense against bacterial infection. Like all the cells of the immune system , neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and circulate in the bloodstream. However, neutrophils move out of blood vessels into infected tissue in order to attack the foreign substance ( allergen , bacteria, etc.). Normally a serious bacterial infection causes the body to produce an increased number of neutrophils, resulting in a higher than normal WBC count . Neutrophils perform their function partially through phagocytosis, a process by which they "eat" other cells and foreign substances. The pus in a boil (abscess) is made up mostly of neutrophils.

    Chronic Thyroiditis (Hashimoto's Disease)

    Chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease is a common thyroid gland disorder that can occur at any age, but it is most often seen in middle aged women. It is caused by a reaction of the immune system against the thyroid gland.

    The onset of the disease is slow, and it may take months or even years for the condition to be detected. Chronic thyroiditis is most common in women and individuals with a family history of thyroid disease. It is estimated to affect between 0.1% and 5% of all adults in Western countries

    Hashimoto's disease may rarely be associated with other endocrine disorders caused by the immune system. When Hashimoto's disease occurs with adrenal insufficiency and type 1 diabetes mellitus, the condition is called type 2 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PGA II).

    Less commonly, Hashimoto's disease occurs with hypoparathyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and fungal infections of the mouth and nails in a condition called type 1 polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PGA I).

    Symptoms & Signs

    Intolerance to cold
    Weight gain - mild
    Fatigue
    Constipation
    Enlarged neck or presence of goiter
    Small or atrophic thyroid gland (late in the disease)
    Dry skin
    Hair loss
    Heavy and irregular menses
    Difficulty concentrating or thinking
    Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

    Weight gain (unintentional)
    Joint stiffness
    Facial swelling
    Note: There may be no symptoms

    Diagnosis & Tests
    Laboratory tests to determine thyroid function include:

    Free T4 test
    Serum TSH
    Free T3 test
    Thyroid autoantibodies are frequently present:
    antithyroid peroxidase antibody
    antithyroglobulin antibody
    This disease may also alter the results of the following tests:

    Radioactive iodine uptake
    Complete blood count
    Total cholesterol
    Serum sodium
    Serum prolactin


  11. ume

    ume New Member

    Thanks, everyone, for taking the time to answer. As with most of our symptoms, fascinating to me how varied we are.

    Fibromaster -- thank you very much for your detailed reply. From some of my friend's comments, I had worried that it was thyroid, but the intial test showed no worries. I did tell her she then really needed to have the more subtle tests done, to be sure, but this person hates doctors even more than most of us already do.

    I can only give her the info. But thanks for all your ideas. (And Hashimoto's is one they should know here, in Japan, at least! <grin>)

    This board is so special!

    Ume
  12. ume

    ume New Member

    Thanks, everyone, for taking the time to answer. As with most of our symptoms, fascinating to me how varied we are.

    Fibromaster -- thank you very much for your detailed reply. From some of my friend's comments, I had worried that it was thyroid, but the intial test showed no worries. I did tell her she then really needed to have the more subtle tests done, to be sure, but this person hates doctors even more than most of us already do.

    I can only give her the info. But thanks for all your ideas. (And Hashimoto's is one they should know here, in Japan, at least! <grin>)

    This board is so special!

    Ume