food allergy tests..........

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by caroleye, Oct 6, 2007.

  1. caroleye

    caroleye New Member

    Which food allergy test have you taken, and what ones seemed to be the most accurate?

    Thanks.
  2. rachel76

    rachel76 New Member

    I can't remember what it is called; The test I have taken was the one where an allergist pricks the skin and put a drop of allergen on that. IT's mainly for inhallents but it can be done for foods. It can say you aren't allergic to something when you are (you can get false negatives). But if it is positive for an allergy then you are definitely allergic to it and it is accurate in that way.
    It is the only test I know that is recognised by "conservative mainstream" medicine.
  3. elliespad

    elliespad Member

    I like RAST testing, very sensitive. This is done with a blood test We have been able to identify low level reactions to several foods for my son which results in SEVERE behavior and learning problems, much like ADD/HD on steroids.

    Even his doctors always said his allergies were so minor so as not to present a problem. But when we cut out those few foods which he scores VERY LOW on, he turns into a normal, high functioning kid. Graduated HS with Regents Degree with Honors, and Freshman year of college was Chemistry Student of the year. Wants a PH.D in Psychics. When he eats his allergy foods, I say he gets MEAN and STUPID, big time. Like a Jeckyl and Hyde.

    Also, certain BETA BLOCKERS, such as Tenormin, prevent someone from skin testing. They can have FATAL reactions.
  4. Nanie46

    Nanie46 Moderator

    Hi, It depends whether you are talking about immediate allergies(hives, breathing difficulty, etc) or delayed allergies(sensitivities).

    If you speak to an allergy Dr they probably will tell you that there is no such thing as delayed food allergies. I think they have a real problem with the word "allergy"...I don't care what they are called, but they are real.

    I do not have immediate allergies, but I have lots of delayed allergies. I had delayed food allergy testing(ELISA) through Sage Med Lab. They have a website. This testing was very accurate in my opinion.

    I was tested for 88 foods/ingredients, and have sensitivities to 22 of them. I then did an elimination diet for 5 months which showed me which foods caused which symptoms.

    Now I know that I need to avoid cane sugar and high fructose CORN syrup because they really increase my pain, soreness, stifness, brain fog and itching.

    With all the other 20 foods I need to take digestive enzymes because they cause some intestinal distress.

    This was very helpful to me and I feel 50% better. I also took Famvir at the same time for 6 months.

    I have posted alot of info on delayed food allergy testing, elimination diet, and viral testing if you care to read more.
  5. caroleye

    caroleye New Member

    Appreciate hearing the different types you've used.

    carole
  6. Nanie46

    Nanie46 Moderator

    Hi,

    My insurance, Blue Shield, covered alot of the cost of my delayed food allergy testing. I think it was around $1600. I did have to pay my copay and deductible, of course.

    It is imperitive that the Dr submits the testing to the insurance company with the right diagnostic codes, so that the insurance co. will deem the test necessary and reasonable.

    The insurance co. will relate food allergy testing to the GI tract and symptoms relating to it. Therefore, the Dr should include diagnoses like IBS, diarrhea, etc, to make it more likely that they will cover it.

    If the Dr submitted just FM as a diagnosis, it is doubtful that they would see the connection and probably would deny it.
  7. ILmom

    ILmom New Member

    I just wanted to share my experience with Sage Medical Laboratories, in case it helps anyone else out. I did the delayed food allergy testing through Sage and it came back saying I was supposedly allergic to 23 different things – many of them very common things (milk & milk products, wheat, corn, gluten, soy, egg) and some of them things I never eat (such as saccharine, aspartame, and codfish). I strictly followed the 6 week total elimination diet, and had some improvement. However, it didn’t totally solve my issue (reflux). At the end of the 6 weeks, I didn’t strictly follow their method of reintroducing foods, though certain foods (milk and wheat) I continued to avoid. Six months later – frustrated that my root problem still persisted – I decided to redo the test to see if there was something new that I was allergic to that was causing the trouble.<BR>
    <BR>
    When I got that second test back, I realized that the supposed “science” behind this testing simply isn’t there. My new test showed that I supposedly had 26 allergies, but only ELEVEN of them were the ones on the last test! Somehow I was magically not allergic to TWELVE items, and suddenly allergic to FIFTEEN new items. Most telling, some of the new allergies were things that I hadn’t consumed in the last year (if ever) – such as crab and lobster! I contacted Sage to express how upset I was about the dramatically different results. They blamed the new allergies on the fact that I did not strictly follow the reintroduction instructions. When I pressed as to how that could possibly cause a new allergy to a food I haven’t consumed, the doctor admitted that the test isn’t perfect and can have “some” false positives. Nevertheless, they stand by their test and refused to refund my wasted money for the second test.<BR>
    <BR>
    I want to be clear that I don’t think the people at Sage are “evil” or just out to take your money. They were actually quite nice and the doctor spent a lot of time with me on the phone trying to justify their test. However, I just think that the science is just not solid enough, especially considering the high cost of the test and the even higher personal cost of trying to eliminate such a high number of things from your diet – many of which are probably perfectly safe for you to eat. You would be better off just trying to eliminate the most common triggers (such as milk, gluten, soy, egg and corn) for a few weeks and see if that makes you feel better. I didn’t ask, but I suspect that a high percentage of the Sage test results tell people they are allergic to some or all of those five items anyway). I hope this is helpful!<BR>
  8. ILmom

    ILmom New Member

    I just wanted to share my experience with Sage Medical Laboratories, in case it helps anyone else out. I did the delayed food allergy testing through Sage and it came back saying I was supposedly allergic to 23 different things – many of them very common things (milk & milk products, wheat, corn, gluten, soy, egg) and some of them things I never eat (such as saccharine, aspartame, and codfish). I strictly followed the 6 week total elimination diet, and had some improvement. However, it didn’t totally solve my issue (reflux). At the end of the 6 weeks, I didn’t strictly follow their method of reintroducing foods, though certain foods (milk and wheat) I continued to avoid. Six months later – frustrated that my root problem still persisted – I decided to redo the test to see if there was something new that I was allergic to that was causing the trouble.<BR>
    <BR>
    When I got that second test back, I realized that the supposed “science” behind this testing simply isn’t there. My new test showed that I supposedly had 26 allergies, but only ELEVEN of them were the ones on the last test! Somehow I was magically not allergic to TWELVE items, and suddenly allergic to FIFTEEN new items. Most telling, some of the new allergies were things that I hadn’t consumed in the last year (if ever) – such as crab and lobster! I contacted Sage to express how upset I was about the dramatically different results. They blamed the new allergies on the fact that I did not strictly follow the reintroduction instructions. When I pressed as to how that could possibly cause a new allergy to a food I haven’t consumed, the doctor admitted that the test isn’t perfect and can have “some” false positives. Nevertheless, they stand by their test and refused to refund my wasted money for the second test.<BR>
    <BR>
    I want to be clear that I don’t think the people at Sage are “evil” or just out to take your money. They were actually quite nice and the doctor spent a lot of time with me on the phone trying to justify their test. However, I just think that the science is just not solid enough, especially considering the high cost of the test and the even higher personal cost of trying to eliminate such a high number of things from your diet – many of which are probably perfectly safe for you to eat. You would be better off just trying to eliminate the most common triggers (such as milk, gluten, soy, egg and corn) for a few weeks and see if that makes you feel better. I didn’t ask, but I suspect that a high percentage of the Sage test results tell people they are allergic to some or all of those five items anyway). I hope this is helpful!<BR>