For all RN's

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by kats1978, Nov 7, 2002.

  1. kats1978

    kats1978 New Member

    I have been thinking about going back to school and getting my RN license for that way I can rely on myself for some money and not have to worry about anything, thing is that I have days that I just can't get out of bed and I know that before I decide to move down to FL that I should have some experience with the job...I was thinking that I should have at least a way to go and get my degree with all that money I saved up, thing is that I would like to know if I should go and get it or if I should just listen to everybody and just get Clinical Medial Assistant and just not worry about having to worry about my FMS when they give me the test...can anybody answer this question for me? I would really like to become a RN but because FMS is in my records then I am not to sure if they will execpt me.

    Past: Living with a nurse for the last 3 & 1/2 yrs, fibro for 17 yrs, and taking care of sick people (pets and friends)
  2. kats1978

    kats1978 New Member

    I have been thinking about going back to school and getting my RN license for that way I can rely on myself for some money and not have to worry about anything, thing is that I have days that I just can't get out of bed and I know that before I decide to move down to FL that I should have some experience with the job...I was thinking that I should have at least a way to go and get my degree with all that money I saved up, thing is that I would like to know if I should go and get it or if I should just listen to everybody and just get Clinical Medial Assistant and just not worry about having to worry about my FMS when they give me the test...can anybody answer this question for me? I would really like to become a RN but because FMS is in my records then I am not to sure if they will execpt me.

    Past: Living with a nurse for the last 3 & 1/2 yrs, fibro for 17 yrs, and taking care of sick people (pets and friends)
  3. kadywill

    kadywill New Member

    I'd say to allow yourself plenty of time due to this illness we share. I got my LPN in 1976 and went on for my RN the next year. I had a toddler and a newborn and a mysterious illness that the doctors didn't know what was! I took pills to lose the 10 lbs. my last pregnancy left me and they were called Ionamine. Whew!!!!!! My grades were excellent, my kids were taken care of, my house was spotless, I was so thin and my hubby was well pleased! This is the only way I made it for the first year and a half! Then I crashed and had to drop out of school. I rested for a couple of years. Then I went back to school and got my four year degree. Then I crashed. Then I rested for a couple of years. Then I worked. Then I crashed. My point? I worked a year TOPS at each nursing job before I would have to stop and take a couple of years off to take care of myself. Motherhood is tough, school is tough, work is tough....nursing is very tough! I am a caregiver by nature and a perfectionist as well. This is a bad combination because I care for everyone but myself. Please don't fall into this; take care of yourself, too! Don't rush this. Nursing is an admirable profession and one that I truly love, but it has taken a toll on me. I take it home with me everyday and I worry about my patients as if they were my family. This stress is difficult to endure on a daily basis. I am ashamed to say that I continue to work because I feel important when I work and I thrive on this....this isn't good. I have no self-worth outside of my job and I know of other nurses on this board who feel the same way and they are dealing with this since they've had to quit working. Think about it.
    Love and best wishes,
    Kady
  4. LindaD.

    LindaD. New Member

    but at the ripe old age of 54, I was forced to retire due to FMS and my inability to do what is or was expected of me.
    Now, a year later, I am well into trying to get my disability, having worked well over 20 years, most of which was nursing.
    I too love to care for others, but this has forced me to turn it around and allow others to care for me. I still try to maintain, but day by day, it gets harder and harder.

    Take it slow, if you are serious about this. Weigh the pros and cons and take advice from an old woman that can't walk errect - you just might go to school, be sucessful and have a wonderful career - or you might go to school, get your license and be at home, in pain. Either way, you have a 50-50 shot. Talk with your Higher Power and let Him make your choice.

    Then, let Him help you.

    Love and best wishes,
    LindaD.
  5. ValG

    ValG New Member

    There is tons of reading. How many sciences do you have now? And then there is clinical practice which often entails all 3 shifts. And the job is demanding. You need a fully functional brain the whole time you're on duty. You're on your feet most of the shift. I would start out low on the totem pole as an aide or CMA. That would give you a feel for the pace you'd have to maintain before you invest in school. There is so much information to learn, you can't afford to miss more than a few days of school, or you'll never keep up. As for your not being accepted into the program because of FM, I have no idea about that.
    I sound pretty discouraging about it because I personally can't imagine going through nursing school with FM. But I have CFIDS which is more fatiguing than FM (or so I've read). I worked for 20 years, then got CFIDS. I would be scared to do something even as physically undemanding as transcribing orders, because it requires accuracy and I often misread words. Med carts are very heavy. There are many distractions when you're supposed to be passing meds extremely accurately. There is no allowance for days when you're in too much pain to care about accuracy.
    My vote goes to looking for something easier.
    Good luck, Valerie