For CFS Sufferers followup

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by jaykiiiid, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. jaykiiiid

    jaykiiiid New Member

    To: CustomerLoyalty@prohealth.com
    Subject: CFS Common Denominater
    As a CFS afflicted person, obviously as most, I am forced to do my own research. After suffering a very recent episode of I.B.S. I did some research on the effects of milk products and casein that is in all forms of milk. It is established one might not be considered lactose intolerant to have serios problems with milk products. Also they will test negitive to any intolerance tests. In relation to this, I worked a mental, stress and physically challenging job for 28 years, with no signs of CFS. Through-out this career I was a working alcohlic, progressing in severe addiction and illness. I was fortunate to be delivered from alcohol with God`s deleverance about five years ago. In my own case I didnt drink milk, eat icecream, nor sweets etc. during the 28 year career. As soon as I became sober milk has been a steady part of my diet as well as icecream and cookies and candy bars for a while. All contain milk. My Cfs symptoms started when milk consumption was reestablished in my life.[In comparison, I had and now have again, ADHD, before and after my career.] I would assume because of the many different symptoms of CFS that one would think there couldnt be a common denominator, BUT! What if there is? Milk! Obviously a profound statement, but I am going to start this new diet today[that was 2 months ago]. Obviously I dont know all the terminology in label reading yet, so I wont be completly "casein" free for a while, but I quit milk this morning[2 months ago]. I have suggested readings and links if you want them. Also I am going to save this email as a time marker of when I sent it to you. I hope you have compassion enough to share this with one of the few professionals in the field of CFS and let them take over from here. If you cant do that, please let me know and I will attempt to foward this to an appropriate member in the field. Thanks and God Bless! Jay
    1st reply:
    I will forward this to the appropriate person and we will see what they have to say. We will be back in touch. Thank you for your information and take care.
    Sincerely,
    Aaron Turner
    ProHealth Customer Service
    ProHealth, Inc.
    Patient Owned, Dedicated to research.
    Phone 1-800-366-6056
    Fax 805-965-0042
    Customerloyalty@prohealth.com
    http://www.ProHealth.com

    His querry to the owner:
    From: ProHealth Customer Loyalty [mailto:customerloyalty@prohealth.com]
    Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 2:36 PM
    To: Rich Carson
    Subject: FW: CFS Common Denominater
    What do you think of this?! I'm just curious what your reaction is.
    2nd reply:
    Hello Jay, I thought you would like to see the email below. The email is from Rich Carson, the owner of our company. It looks like you are on to something here and it also looks like we were already moving in that direction with the lactase enzyme product. Visit back soon to see the progress we make on this. Thank you again for your feedback and take care.
    Sincerely,
    Aaron Turner
    ProHealth Customer Service
    ProHealth, Inc.
    Patient Owned, Dedicated to research.
    Phone 1-800-366-6056
    Fax 805-965-0042
    Customerloyalty@prohealth.com
    http://www.ProHealth.com

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Rich Carson
    Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2006 7:12 PM
    To: Customer Loyalty
    Cc: Wayne Conwell
    Subject: RE: CFS Common Denominator
    Hi Aaron,
    This guy is definitely onto something, as some new research indicates a significant majority of CFS sufferers have a lactase enzyme deficiency. One of the members of the ProHealth medical advisory board, Kenny De Meirleir M.D. PhD., has found that patients generally do better if they include a lactase enzyme with virtually every meal, even if they are not sure if it contains lactose. The enzyme is very inexpensive, and Taylor has been looking at bringing on a lactase enzyme supplement soon. I was hopeful that we would have a good lactase enzyme to introduce in the two upcoming catalogs, but they go to the printer Wed. of next week and it looks like we may not have time to get one in the books. Therefore, we will introduce a lactase enzyme on the web site within the next four to six weeks. (Taylor, please let me know what you are looking at: i.e. the product should be in capsule form, and have a significantly large dose of lactase per cap; and the price/mg. lactase should be a very good value for PH as well).
    Once again, a patient is doing us a nice favor by sharing some very insightful info. Please thank him for the heads up.
    We will try to bring this new research to the attention of our customers and web visitors as the story develops. Hopefully that will be within the next two or three months.
    Good job in CS Aaron! You are doing a great job, and it is a pleasure to work with someone as smart and compassionate as you. Thanks for a job well done!
    Cheers,
    Rich
    Cc Wayne
    Kenny De Meirleir, M.D., Ph.D.
    Kenny De Meirleir, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of physiology and medicine at Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium, where he is also director of the Human Performance Laboratory and Fatigue Clinic. Since 1990, Dr. De Meirleir has seen thousands of patients struggling with chronic fatigue at the university-based clinic in Brussels. He is a member of the board of directors of the American Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and is board certified in internal medicine (since 1982) and cardiac rehabilitation (since 1986) in Belgium. Dr. De Meirleir serves as editor of the Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (2002). He has authored or coauthored several hundred journal articles and books on internal medicine, cardiology, exercise physiology, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Currently, Dr. De Meirleir conducts rigorous research on the etiology, diagnosis and treatment of CFS. In addition to his research and teaching, he serves as president of a medical disciplinary committee and on a provincial medical regulatory commission. He is co-editor of the groundbreaking new book “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Biological Approach” (CRC Press, 2002) which presents his novel research into the causes and pathogenesis of CFS.