FOR THE MEN

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by allhart, Nov 2, 2002.

  1. allhart

    allhart New Member

    found this artical for you men,thought you mught find its interresting
    kara

    Men living with fibromyalgia-type pain: experiences as patients in the Swedish health care system.

    Paulson M, Norberg A, Danielson E.

    Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with fibromyalgia (FM) frequently use health care services and experience only short-term improvements. They often feel that health care staff do not take them seriously. This increases the burden of living with the illness. AIM: To describe how men living with fibromyalgia-type pain experienced being patients in the Swedish health care system. METHOD: Narrative interviews with 14 men who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of fibromyalgia. Content analysis was used when analysing the data. RESULTS: The results are described using five themes. Theme I 'Feeling afraid of being looked upon as being a whiner' highlights how the men endured a lot of pain before they sought health care, and how difficult it was to find a receptive listener. Theme 2 'Feeling like a guinea pig' shows that the men's feelings were twofold; they wanted examinations, even if these made them feel that they were being exposed to numerous treatments without any cure. Theme 3 'Feeling hopeful' describes the hope for a cure after having been referred to a specialist clinic. Theme 4 'Feeling neglected' illustrates being looked upon as an uninteresting patient and theme 5 'Feeling no recovery' illustrates the pain relief they gained, but not the actual cure. CONCLUSION: Men with FM type pain experienced a long wait before treatment at a specialist clinic as well as no continuity and follow-ups in primary care and general hospitals. Encounters with engaged and skilful staff promoted the men's well-being despite the fact that no cure was available. Not being respected led to a feeling of being neglected despite the care received. Thus, the men had to accept the fact that they would never recover.

  2. allhart

    allhart New Member

    found this artical for you men,thought you mught find its interresting
    kara

    Men living with fibromyalgia-type pain: experiences as patients in the Swedish health care system.

    Paulson M, Norberg A, Danielson E.

    Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Ostersund, Sweden

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with fibromyalgia (FM) frequently use health care services and experience only short-term improvements. They often feel that health care staff do not take them seriously. This increases the burden of living with the illness. AIM: To describe how men living with fibromyalgia-type pain experienced being patients in the Swedish health care system. METHOD: Narrative interviews with 14 men who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for classification of fibromyalgia. Content analysis was used when analysing the data. RESULTS: The results are described using five themes. Theme I 'Feeling afraid of being looked upon as being a whiner' highlights how the men endured a lot of pain before they sought health care, and how difficult it was to find a receptive listener. Theme 2 'Feeling like a guinea pig' shows that the men's feelings were twofold; they wanted examinations, even if these made them feel that they were being exposed to numerous treatments without any cure. Theme 3 'Feeling hopeful' describes the hope for a cure after having been referred to a specialist clinic. Theme 4 'Feeling neglected' illustrates being looked upon as an uninteresting patient and theme 5 'Feeling no recovery' illustrates the pain relief they gained, but not the actual cure. CONCLUSION: Men with FM type pain experienced a long wait before treatment at a specialist clinic as well as no continuity and follow-ups in primary care and general hospitals. Encounters with engaged and skilful staff promoted the men's well-being despite the fact that no cure was available. Not being respected led to a feeling of being neglected despite the care received. Thus, the men had to accept the fact that they would never recover.

  3. rge

    rge New Member

    That about sums it up!

    I had to diagnose All of my problems myself and then verify them by going to the correct type of doctor.

    Ron
  4. Bigfoot

    Bigfoot New Member

    I think I've shown symptoms for years. I never mentioned it to doctors because I thought they would think I was a hypochondriac or something. It finally got so bad that I started trying to diagnose myself like RGE did. I thought I had MS, but as the tests kept coming back negative for MS my symptoms were getting worse. That's when the doctor said I had FMS. I don't know if other guys feel this way, but I don't like to tell many people that I have FMS. I feel like a whimp (even though I'm 6'5" and 245 lbs) when people give me the "Oh......Uh huh" attitude.
  5. MsJoey

    MsJoey New Member

    often feel the same as the people in the article and you guys who posted. I don't much like telling anyone what I have, either. I hate getting THE LOOK. And like you, Bigfoot, that condescending reply of OH, UH-HUH! Sometimes that means yeah, another whacko.....is what they are thinking. My brother has FMS also, and he refuses any medical treatment for all of these reasons and more. So he turned to alcohol, sadly. He still works full time but when he gets home he hits the bottle for pain relief. He won't even talk about FMS. So I don't either usually. Kind of strange, considering we are very close and could help each other. This DD takes its toll in many different ways.
  6. Phoenix

    Phoenix New Member

    It took from 1980 to 1984 to Dx me...and I was one of the lucky ones.

    As a male, built much like brother bigfoot, its very difficult to have a disease where you get that "you don't look sick" verse and expect a wink-and-a-nod to come next.

    I guess much of it has to do with how we socialize our boy-children and, society's normative expectations of of those same boy-children types.

    THANKS for sharing;0)
    [This Message was Edited on 11/03/2002]