Freezing weather - does it take your breath away??

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by dorabella, Feb 1, 2006.

  1. dorabella

    dorabella New Member

    I was wondering if the freezing temperatures adversely affect anyone else.

    I certainly ache more than usual and sometimes it makes me feel a little light headed and slightly breathless. I also get very physically tense from flinching against the cold. London has been like Siberia for the last couple of weeks......

    Does it affect you this way?

  2. suzybee

    suzybee New Member

    Hi, I can agree with you there that is for sure. I have asthma as well as FMS and I always get more breathless on frosty days. I was just thinking to myself just before I read your message just how breathless I was feeling again. I don't know if it has anything at all to do with FMS but its certainly affected me over the years. I think you are so apt in describing the tensing up when its cold as I am sure we all do that as a natural defense but lets face it with FMS thats a real problem. The thing that affects me the worst with my FMS with the weather though is damp days and that can include humid hot and wet cold days. It really plays havoc with me and I hardly know what to do with myself to reduce the pain on those days. I get so fed up of feeling like I am in a concrete suit that is drying fast on me then. I too am in the UK in Somerset. Take care and hope you get some better weather soon. Suzy
  3. auntcon

    auntcon New Member

    I've been in bed for a week because of the change in weather when I "get a chill" it really causes me PAIN. I usually put a scarf around my mouth (Like the kid from THE CHRISTMAS STORY) The weather here (WV) changes from the 30s to the 50s sometimes daily that is hard on me.
    hope you're doing better (Don't forget to take your allergy meds - it's terrible to have anything else on top of the Fibro)
  4. Rosiebud

    Rosiebud New Member

    I hate being cold but I prefer it to the rain.

    I'm not out much so dont know if the cold would affect my breathing but my daughter who has CFS has had breathing problems lately so perhaps this is why.

    I like to keep my home really warm and my hubby hates the heat so the cold brings

  5. dorabella

    dorabella New Member

    Thanks for the replies.

    I must admit I don't have asthma or take drugs or supplements for FM. It's purely the cold weather - which this morning was close to freezing in central London - probably making me so tense I felt breathless.

    I have taken to wearing hat and scarf which irritates the hell out of me since I don't like having anything on my head except for fresh air and I felt somewhat disorientated.

    Seems to affect us all in a similar fashion. What with extremes of cold weather / hot weather / damp weather etc etc is there any climate that is FM-friendly???


  6. kch64

    kch64 New Member

    I LOVE IT. I would rather have cold than hot. I feel sicker in hot weather.

  7. LadyCarol

    LadyCarol Member

    I'm finding the cold weather is triggering extreme breathlessness. Being outside in anything around 2c for around 2 minutes or so sees me gasping for air and it can take anywhere between 5 to 40 minutes to recover once inside.

    Is anyone else finding they have this problem and what do you do to get around it ?

    I've been advised to stay indoors when it's cold but that's always practical.
  8. justdifferent

    justdifferent New Member

    are one well-known trigger for asthma, especially upon exertion.

    The cold and damp northwestern European winters flare my slight arthritis and cause CFS pain to worsen significantly. I now completely understand why older people prefer "a place in the sun" - the pain index is lower, even for people without CFS/Fibro.
  9. LadyCarol

    LadyCarol Member

    I've no symptoms of asthma but tomorrow I have to go to hospital as today the breathlessness got really bad and included chest pains. Will cover mouth area when outside to see if that helps with breathing, thanks for the advice.