Genetic research - announcement soon

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Bluebottle, Jun 25, 2009.

  1. Bluebottle

    Bluebottle New Member

    A provisional abstract and paper covering Prof John Gow's research into gene expression in ME/CFS, that has been funded by the MEA Ramsay Research Fund, has been published today.

    More details on these important research findings, which have implications for both a diagnostic test and specific forms of drug treatment, will be available on the ME Association website shortly.

    here's the brief outline I've found

    "The study found that patients and healthy controls differed significantly in the level of expression of 366 genes - especially in relation to functional implications involving immune modulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis (a form of cell death in which a programmed sequence of events leads to elimination of cells without releasing harmful substances into the surrounding area).

    The authors conclude:

    Differential expression of key genes identified in this study offer an insight into the possible mechanism of chronic fatigue following infection. The representative biomarkers identified in this research appear promising as potential biomarkers for differential diagnosis and treatment."
    [This Message was Edited on 06/25/2009]
    [This Message was Edited on 06/25/2009]
  2. Rafiki

    Rafiki New Member

    Thanks so much for always staying on top of this stuff!

    I've been tracking this stuff for 30 years and real answers have never felt so close.

    peace out
  3. Bluebottle

    Bluebottle New Member

    This has had to be funded by a tiny charity because the psychiatric profession take all the UK taxpayer's research funding into M.E./CFS. All taxpayer funding of genetic research into M.E./CFS has been refused.

  4. jasminetee

    jasminetee Member

    Thanks for posting this. This is good news for us. :)

  5. denis321

    denis321 New Member

    My concern is the very small size of the study - 8 sick folks and 7 healthy controls.

    Unless there are very clear cut results, variations in gene expression seen with such a small group could merely reflect variations among different people (regardless of their health status).
    It's a start and hopefully someone will fund a bigger duplicate study. It would also be interesting to see if the genes found here are same as Kerr and others' work.
  6. skeptik2

    skeptik2 Member

    When I show my drs a study, they invariably say, "it must be 500+ patients to be relevant".

  7. denis321

    denis321 New Member

    there have been good studies with less than 500 people.

    It comes down to the design of the study, the illness being studied, and statistics. There are ways to mathematically estimate how many people need to be studied in order to yield a statistically reliable result. However, given the overall poor state of CFS research, I doubt there is enough data to calculate what size is needed to yield a good result so we have to fall back on larger numbers for now.

    Of course, the more the results of a study are replicated, the better.

    When it comes to medical research, most doctors rely on reviews of several studies and not on individual studies to make medical decisions (for good reason). However, at the same time, it is important to realize that most doctors do not have adequate training to interpret studies well. (aside from the time/ effort needed to read individual studies) That is why most physician-researchers have collaborators with research/ stats backgrounds or have additional research training.
  8. simpsons

    simpsons Member

    hi we posted together on this so will delete mine so that there is just one thread to avoid confusion. yes lets hope that this applies more pressure on the uk government to fund more research in gene expression. Time for a push now i think

    am exhausted right now but remember that kerrs gene research did show cell death expect someone with less brain fog can fill us in

    do you have the link to kerr's research so we can check out the two together?

    [This Message was Edited on 06/26/2009]
  9. Bluebottle

    Bluebottle New Member

  10. simpsons

    simpsons Member

  11. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    We need more studies and we need well designed studies which are not funded by drug companies nor anyone with a political agenda and an investment in the outcomes.

    Simple common sense says that these illnesses appear to run in families. My Mom had FMS, both my daughters have it and I have it, as well as CFIDS/ME. My Mother's Mother probably had it from what I've been told about her.

    Soldiers who came home from the first Gulf War with GWI often have family members who are sick, even their pets. Does this mean our illnesses are caused by infection? Does the infection affect our DNA? Or, are we genetically predisposed to our illnesses. So far, it's been a chicken 'n egg question.

    Any good research is long overdue and welcomed.

    Love, Mikie
  12. simpsons

    simpsons Member

    so today i just had a call from a friend who has been suffering fatigue for a while now she had back pain and no further explanation was offered than its fatigue and some pain prob relating to back surgery.

    todays call stated that she has cancer. thats why she has been feeling so tired and exhausted.

    this is the danger of the fatigue dx being dismissed by dr's in the uk

    I welcome this gene research especially as dr chaudhrui is a neurologist to my understanding.

  13. ladybugmandy

    ladybugmandy Member

    wasn't chaudhuri one of the doctors who examined sophia mirza's brain stem after her death and said that it looked like she had a herpes viral infection?

    disbelief isn't new...the same thing happened with MS and other diseases. what's weird is that most of the world has now accepted that it is a physical disease, except the UK.
  14. AuntTammie

    AuntTammie New Member

    I wouldn't really say that most of the world has accepted that it is physical.....I do agree that the UK seems to be the worst for refusing to believe that, but the US is trying awfully hard (thanks to the CDC's spreading misinformation) to say it's all psychological, and the prevailing attitude here still seems to be along those lines....and from what I have heard there are several other countries that have not realy accepted that it is physical either
  15. quilp

    quilp New Member

    Hello luminescentfeeling I feel exactly the same way as you in respect of jailing Wessely et al.
    ME patients have committed suicide because of the comments made above, and, might I add, many many more, and yet these 'academices' are allowed to proceed with impunity.
    Wessely claims to be curing 33% of patients with a further 33% making a 'significant' recovery. These quite simply, are lies. 'Talking and graded exercise'. When we hit the depths of despair, with unbelieveable pain, what did he think we were doing ? Hiding under our beds ?
    We, in our desperation have tried it all, from 3am cold baths, to draconian diets. I really hate this man with a passion because he has caused caused an immense amount of unnecessary suffering and yet in the face of overwhelming scientifc proof, he chooses to expand his propaganda further afield.

    However, I deride a great deal of pleasure from the fact that whatever Wessely might have achieved in his career, his legacy with be the fact that he instigated, presided and perpetuated over one of the biggest modern day medical scandals. He will come to be reviled in a way he never thought possible. He claims to have helped thousands, but the truth is he has caused suffering to millions. Imagine being married to this man, imagine being his children. I need a bath just thinking about him. The question is not if, it is when. I just hope he's alive when it happens.

    Kind regards, Mark
  16. simpsons

    simpsons Member

    do you think if the title was provisional abstract new gene research it might get more attention. hope you don.t mind my suggestion

    peace love and goodwill