"Getting a scooter means giving up"what do you say to this?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by kholmes, May 29, 2006.

  1. kholmes

    kholmes New Member

    When I told a friend that I was thinking about getting a scooter, he worried that I was giving up, and that perhaps I could put the money toward something that would help me to get better.
    I have CFS, and I've been unable to walk more than about 30 feet without a considerable worsening of my symptoms for over a year now. I've also spent thousands of dollars on western and alternative therapies in trying to get better.
    A scooter would help me get outside, get the mail, walk the dog, go to the park that's a hundred yards from my house.
    But how can I reassure this friend that I am not GIVING UP!?
    Kholmes
  2. mme_curie68

    mme_curie68 New Member

    How can something that will help you to be more active mean that you are giving up?

    Wouldn't giving up be staying homebound and not doing something for yourself that will get you out into the world?

    That normal people think we are somehow compromising our fight to improve by using an assistive device bugs the heck out of me.

    Normals use assistive devices EVERY day and don't think twice about using them - for example:

    grocery cart - try doing a week's worth of shopping without one

    automobile - try walking 20 miles to go out to eat or to work every day

    I spent about a month on crutches and then a year with a cane after a nasty auto accident five years ago. Doing chemistry with one hand was often very interesting. Plus, the injury was to my left knee so had to use crutch and cane on right side (I am right-handed).

    But you do what you gotta do - I figured out how to do a lot of things with one free hand - I found a box that I modified for my needs and when I needed to get samples from Point A to Point B I would pack them in the box and add items to make sure everything was stable.

    Acknowledging that you need help is a sign of strength, not weakness.

    You may need a scooter now, but who knows, maybe next year we'll have some kind of breakthrough with this DD and you'll go into remission and won't need it.

    With the scooter, you won't have to be on the sidelines as much as you are now. Increased mobility will be an improvement for you, not a step backward.

    I hope that if the day should ever come for me where I need mobility assistance again, that I don't hesitate to embrace something that will enhance my quality of life.

    Hugs,
    Madame Curie
  3. NyroFan

    NyroFan New Member

    kholmes:

    I would say get it. I am thinking about the time I willl need it. It is sort of let-down, but maybe very much needed.

    nyrofan
  4. hugs4evry1

    hugs4evry1 New Member

    You don't have to do anything to convince someone you're not giving up, however....

    If it were me, I'd be decorating the darn thing just like my bike when I was 8 years old. I'd have a tall banner type thingy on the back of the seat, long cheerleader type things from the handle bars and a bell if someone gets in my way!!

    While we're at it, let's add a pretty basket too.

    Hugs,

    Nancy B.
  5. dragon06

    dragon06 New Member

    It is NOT giving up! Using something that improves your quality of life is not giving up, it means you are saying you are going on with your life regardless of the dd!!!

    Getting a scooter will help with your health. It puts less stress on your body which helps with the illness.

    Explain to your friend that this isn't giving up but if they don't understand get the scooter anyways, it's your life, you enjoy it!
  6. Scapper

    Scapper New Member

    What if you told your friend exactly what you told us. That this will enable you to do more than you have been. It is empowering you and giving you more of a quality of life.

    Also, it helps when people don't think things are permanent. This is what you have to do for now, with the hopes that it will bring you to a higher level of health.

    In the meantime, do what's best for you and your friend will visibly see the positive results :)

    scapper
  7. Shannonsparkles

    Shannonsparkles New Member

    Kholmes, it's not in you to give up.

    Tell your friend that riding a scooter will give you tight abs from all the sitting. ;) Serriously, riding a scooter does use muscles, SO you could say that it's a mild form of exercise that doesn't wear you out. Mild exercise that doesn't wear you out is supposed to be helpful for anyone with the DD. So, a scooter COULD be a tool that could help you to feel better. It's not a loss. It's not giving up.

    And (tell your sister this too if you get a cance), I wouldn't be surprised if bumping over the pavement a little every day gets your lymph system moving, kind of like riding a bicycle. :)

    Anybody would agree that fresh air is good for you, and sunshine, and scenery, and independance. Anything that helps your mood and gives you something to look forward to in a day is good for you physically.

    And, if none of that will convince your friend... do it anyway.

    You know what's best for you. It makes no sense to be tethered to a 30 foot limit in life and suffer from worsening symptoms when you can enjoy freedom and activity while saving your strength so your body can work on getting better. The scooter is a good and helpful thing, and you totally deserve it. :) Go for it!!!!!!
    (((( )))) Shannon



  8. mahx

    mahx New Member

    No way...i call it getting real.

    Getting real about the situation and place physically each of us our in.

    I am sure your friend means well, and only wants the very best for you. The very best to your friend would be...not needing a scooter, and being well.

    The very best for alot of us, is to have some portion of normalcy and independence.

    It does not mean we have given up on ourselves. Perhaps some days you won't need the scooter as much as others.
    Perhaps someday not at all. Good luck to you.


    MA
  9. carebelle

    carebelle New Member

    You do not have to convince ANYONE of anything .You have to make your own decisions as to what will help you have a better quality of life.No one knows what your pain is better then you.
    It sounds to me like just thinking about the new found freedoms a scooter will give you has given you hope to take something back from these DD's.
    Never aloud someone to make you feel guilty for trying to make your own decisions.
    probably the best way to reassure your friend ,that you are not giving up is to show him how much more you can do and want to do for yourself with the scooter.And nothing says you have to use it everyday and You may not have to use it forever.We all need to keep HOPE that there will come a cure for these DD's sooner then later.
    Do what you need to do to be happy .
  10. Cabbie

    Cabbie New Member

    A scooter is freedom, not giving up. Freedom to enjoy things you want to do without getting exhausted and to go places you couldn't go otherwise. I use my scooter for shopping, going to crafts shows and concerts on our town green, going to the anywhere I have to park my car a long distance from my destination (state park for example), and "strolling" the neighborhood and visiting with neighbors. I can't stand very long either to do all this: the scooter enables me to do it all.

    My scooter is candy-apple red, and I'm thinking of having flames painted on it! I have a baseball cap, black with red & yellow flames that I wear when I ride it, and I get lots of positive comments! Go for it!

    Cabbie
  11. Adl123

    Adl123 New Member

    Hi,
    Your friend is wrong.

    That sounds like the stupid thing my father said to me when I was about 10, and I asked for a pair of sunglasses, because the sun bothered my eyes. He said my eyes would get weak, and it was better not to wear them! I have never heard of anythng so rediculous.

    Recognizing that one needs a certain thing , in order to function better, is maturity, not giving up. I complement you on your courage in being willng to use a scooter. Many people are in denial and just won't use one, and suffeer as a result.

    I've used a scooter at supermarkets and large stores for 6 years. I would not be able to do my shopping if it were not for them. 2 years ago I bought a small , collapsable scooter that I take to malls and fairs. It's just wonderful. When I can afford it, I'm going to get a four-wheeled scooter to use to go to the store, and around town. I live in a hilly town, so I need a really strong one.

    Please, use a scooter if you feel you need one, and don't listen to people who don't understand. They are limited in their understanding.

    Good luck, and happy riding!!!
    Terry
  12. kholmes

    kholmes New Member

    I love how friends rally around you on this board and make you think logically, especially after you feel the irrational need to defend yourself to a doctor, friend or family member.
    Ken