Good news for long term abx treatment

Discussion in 'Lyme Disease Archives' started by jarjar, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. jarjar

    jarjar New Member

    Posted for those that have not read this on other sites.
    Good to see some positive things are happening for our treatments.

    posted 15 June, 2007 06:19 AM
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://www.prweb.com:80/releases/2007/6/prweb533564.htm
    http://tinyurl.com/2aetj8

    New Evidence on Lyme Disease Supports Need for Extended Treatment Therapy

    Evidence-based article in prestigious infectious disease journal supports ILADS treatment recommendations. Science in this area is still evolving

    Bethesda, MD (PRWEB) June 15, 2007 -- The

    International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) today announced that, for the first time, evidence supporting the ILADS position on the treatment of Lyme disease has been published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID), considered one of the most prestigious publications in the field of infectious diseases and microbiology.

    It is the first time that evidence supporting the ILADS position has ever been published in an American infectious disease journal.

    The duration of treatment for Lyme disease has been a contentious issue among physicians.

    The fact that two major medical associations - the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS) - have released conflicting guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease has fueled the controversy.

    "Publication of our recommendations about the most effective treatment for Lyme disease in a journal like CID is a milestone for ILADS," said Dr. Raphael Stricker, president of ILADS. "Doctors, patients and insurance companies need to know that the IDSA guidelines are flawed."

    Difficult to Diagnose
    A primary factor in the Lyme disease controversy is that the disease can be difficult to diagnose. Not every patient suffers from the typical "bull's-eye" rash and joint inflammation, considered classic symptoms of Lyme disease that is transmitted by the bite of a tiny tick.

    ILADS research indicates that only 50%-60% of patients typically recall a tick bite; the rash is reported in only 35% to 60% of patients; and joint swelling typically occurs in only 20% to 30% of patients. And given the prevalence of over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication such as Ibuprofen, the joint inflammation is often masked.

    Many patients with Lyme disease will continue to experience a variety of symptoms, even after the treatment recommended by IDSA. Some of these patients go on to develop multiple nonspecific symptoms, making it very difficult to diagnose chronic Lyme disease.

    One reason for this difficulty is that Borrelia burgdorferi, the corkscrew-shaped bacteria that causes the disease, has an unusual genetic makeup.

    This allows the bacteria to screw its way into a variety of cells and evade the body's immune system. According to ILADS research, the Lyme bacteria invades multiple tissues and is able to assume a dormant state much like tuberculosis. This can make treatment much more difficult.

    Extended Therapy
    Based on extensive clinical evidence, ILADS maintains that extended antibiotic therapy for Lyme disease is sometimes necessary, particularly in later disease that is more difficult to eradicate.

    Studies have shown that Borrelia burgdorferi can persist after antibiotic treatment. In particular, studies conducted in animals - including mice, dogs and monkeys - indicate that the corkscrew-shaped bacteria can persist after treatment is completed.

    Persistence in humans has been confirmed by culture or molecular testing in at least a dozen studies.

    "Science in this area is still evolving," according to Stricker. "We don't have all the answers and it is too early to adopt treatment strategies that assume we do. Meanwhile, doctors need flexible treatment approaches," he said.

    The article describing the ILADS position on treatment of Lyme disease will be published in the July 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

    About ILADS
    ILADS is a nonprofit, international, multidisciplinary medical society dedicated to the diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Lyme disease and associated tick-borne infections.

    ILADS promotes understanding of tick-borne diseases through research and education and strongly supports physicians and other health care professionals dedicated to advancing the standard of care for tick-borne diseases.

  2. ANNXYZ

    ANNXYZ New Member

    This is such a problem in Texas where we are supposed to be cured after 28 days of ABX . Most of us here are forced to self treat .

    May God help us find a real bullet to fix this disease .

    I know a lot of folks on ABX swho still do not seem to get a cure . The picture is confusing .
  3. mollystwin

    mollystwin New Member

    I saw this on my other lyme board today too! It's great news.

    I know quite a few people now who have recovered and have gone on with thier lives after long term abx. So I know that it is effective!

    There do seem to be those who do not get better. I think with proper diet, a good dr, and lots of research, the chances of recovery are much better. We all need to be our own advocates and learn as much as we can about the illness so that we can know how to get better. The few people I know are struggling with recovery for several years or longer are usually (but not always) the ones with poor diet and who refuse to give up their cocktails! Or don't take all their meds as instructed. And dont' understand the illness at all.

    I wish everyone on this board good days to come!!![This Message was Edited on 06/16/2007]
  4. jarjar

    jarjar New Member

    Some people respond and some don't but the option has to be on the table. There is just so much research that needs to be done with this disease.

    Also Jen since I last visited with you I added Xango to my Marshall Protocol and Ambrotose. I've only been on it a week and am very impressed so far. I cut back my Ambrotose doseage when I added the Xango.

    When I saw Brian put mangosteen juice on his list of top treatments to combine along with the MP, I decided to try it especially since it has helped many on lymenet.

    My attitude was if Xango will let you try 2 cases, or 8 bottles and money back if you aren't happy what do I have to lose? No, Im not sellnig it I just bought off the net at the cheapest price I could find.

    I will keep you posted on how I'm doing as I think I still have your email.

    Also Victoria I hope you read this as I remember you asked how I was doing not too long ago. Things are good! No naps and swimming in the evening with my kids. Very little pain left but still need more cognitive improvements.


  5. hopeful4

    hopeful4 New Member

    Thanks for posting this. Finally getting this published in a Clinical Infectious Disease Journal! This is good news, and we can all use some of that!
  6. lefty

    lefty New Member

    jarjar

    Are you on the full MP? Was thinking about trying it but like you would like to add in some other things with it and they are strict...

    thanks

  7. jarjar

    jarjar New Member

    Yes I'm still on the MP what are you wanting to add?
  8. victoria

    victoria New Member

    good news, isn't it!

    I am going to copy this off to send to my son't attorney for his SSI, altho his hearing probably won't come for another 2+ years...