Gritting Teeth

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by granmama, Nov 18, 2002.

  1. granmama

    granmama New Member

    What exactly causes one to grit their teeth, day or night?

    I started after taking Zoloft 3 years ago. I do grit my teeth some during the day but, it is worse at night. The initial doc that prescribed it said it wasn't the Zoloft it was stress, WELL HELLO... isn't the Zoloft suppose to counteract that?

    I guess what I am asking is does anyone know medically what causes you to do it. Is there something in SSRI's that make us do this?

    thanks for any suggestions,
    granmama
  2. granmama

    granmama New Member

    What exactly causes one to grit their teeth, day or night?

    I started after taking Zoloft 3 years ago. I do grit my teeth some during the day but, it is worse at night. The initial doc that prescribed it said it wasn't the Zoloft it was stress, WELL HELLO... isn't the Zoloft suppose to counteract that?

    I guess what I am asking is does anyone know medically what causes you to do it. Is there something in SSRI's that make us do this?

    thanks for any suggestions,
    granmama
  3. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    My jaw and the back of my head ache constantly from the unconscious gritting, clenching and rubbing back and forth that I do. If I didn't wear a hard splint at night, I'd probably have no teeth left by now.
    I have read elsewhere on this Board that trigger points in the jaw may be responsible, and that it can be fixed by Myofascial Release done by an LMT who knows Traeger Release Work. I could not find one in my area. I just ordered a book that claims to be able to teach you to do trigger point release on yourself at home. If it turns out to work, I'll let everyone know.
    I have also been told by my Neurologist that it is a common side-effect due to my brain damage, and the fact that I continue to do things I should not do with such a damaged brain. However, I know many other FMSers with this problem who never had a head injury like I did.
    I did not have the problem until I went off my SSRI, but I was taking a sedating one (Luvox) not an energizing one, like you are. At least you aren't on Effexor...that one would probably make your teeth dance a jig!
    I am seeing a specialist in PsychoNeuroEndocrinolgy this Thursday and this is on my list to ask about, provided I'm allowed to talk....I hope this isn't another doc who thinks he's God!
    I have no answer for you, except to protect your teeth with a night splint. I will be looking forward to reading the other answers you get.
    In empathy,
    Klutzo
  4. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Flexeril caused me to stop doing this during the night, but it wasn't effective for anything else and it causes rapid weight gain.

    Klonopin not only keeps me from grinding, but it gives me 8 hours of uninterrupted, restful sleep, it has gotten rid of my anxiety/panic attacks, and it has greatly reduced my sensory overload. I don't have RLS, but it is good for that too. It has reduced my "Charlie horse" spasms and cramps.

    Love, Mikie
  5. karen55

    karen55 New Member

    I've done this all my life, or at least as far back as I can remember, almost always in my sleep. I find that it happens most often when I'm under a lot of stress or in a lot of pain, or both (duh!). Sometimes I wake up (like this morning) and I've sort of chewed a sore spot in the inside of my cheek in my mouth - I sleep on my side and it's on the side that was pressing against the pillow. When things are going well for me - low stress, low pain level - I don't usually grit my teeth.
  6. herekitty

    herekitty New Member

    If you enter "zoloft tmj" into your search engine, you will find several sites that explain that teeth grinding and clenching IS one of the recognized side effects of Zoloft and other SSRI's. Just because your doctor hasn't heard of it, means the usual when it comes to those guys: nothing. So the short answer is "Yes, it could be the Zoloft".
    Kitty =^..^=
  7. granmama

    granmama New Member

    Thanks Kitty,
    I did a search and found many references to SSRI's and TMJ.
    I wish I could get off Zoloft, but just one day of forgetting to take it, my sense of balance is off and I feel somewhat disassociated with what is going on around me. Weird huh?
    I too get those sores on the inside of my mouth and wake up with imprint of my teeth on the edges of my tongue.

    My TMJ is getting worse. It is getting harder to chew food and I have to open my mouth real wide and re-align my jaw just to get relief. It pops sometimes and boy does that hurt!

    thanks for all replies,
    granmama
  8. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    Bruxism, often referred to as “gnashing,” is the act of involuntary teeth grinding, either while awake or asleep, which results primarily in tooth damage and jaw pain and which seems to be caused by psychological effects of everyday stress. Damage to the teeth can be so severe that it renders the teeth useless. Nocturnal bruxism occurs in an estimated 5% to 20% of adults and is even more prevalent among children. In fact, most patients with bruxism develop it in adolescence or early adulthood. There is currently no sex-specific information for the incidence of bruxism. Bruxism rarely begins after age 40, and it seems to become less of a problem with age. Nocturnal bruxism is especially problematic because it's usually not detected until the teeth are affected, which can take years.
    Bruxism occurs an average of 25 times per night, in four- to five-second episodes. Thus, people with bruxism may grind their teeth for more than two minutes during just one night’s sleep.

    Causes

    What causes bruxism is unknown, though several factors are thought to precede its occurrence. These include stress, facial or oral trauma, nervous system malfunction, poor diet, and allergies. Alcohol and drug use is suspected to increase the occurrence of bruxism. Children with bruxism usually stop grinding their teeth before adulthood. However, bruxism can affect adults for an indefinite period of time. Adults with bruxism have increased occurrence of grinding during times of job, family, or health stress.



    I have suffered from this since a child---I am so loud, my children in their own rooms can hear me. It has ruined my teeth. I am taking klonopin, now, and it has ceased.
    Karen
  9. sybil

    sybil New Member

    sometimes i am woken up by muscle spasms in my jaw that makes my teeth bang together!!

    sybilxxx