Help, Appt set with Social Security

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JP, Apr 28, 2003.

  1. JP

    JP New Member

    on May 7th.

    I have been on California State Disability since July 7th of 2002. On my last medical appointment a few days ago, my Doctor basically said that my body wouldn’t allow me to work. So, I only know some of the SSD stories that have been told in this community. Will I have any trouble getting SSD since I am already on State Disability? My doctor put me out using several of the ICD9 codes for the disease of my spine. She did not bring in FMS, Hashimoto's or any other condition. In fact, she said the condition of my spine was enough for long-term disability.

    My plans are to just walk in, have my appointment with SSD and leave. I have a few specialists that I have worked with and my family doc has all the reports and consultation letters. I am applying with her statement alone. I have loads of reports, pictures, lab tests, you name it, and I have been there.

    Is there anything I should know/do in advance? SSD told me I might have a 3-month wait, which works. Is there any reason I might not get SSD? I own my home and have an advance degree. Could they fight me and try to say I could work because of my accumulated skills and education?

    All new to this...please help if you can...Jan
  2. Kathryn

    Kathryn New Member

    going into the SS office if at all possible. You don't want to give them the idea that you are in better health than you are. Phone them for the application, and return all papers by mail. KEEP COPIES OF EVERYTHING!!!! Ask for a telephone interview. I got mine approved on the first go around, with no attorney, no exams, and no denials. I started out treating my application as a full time job. I researched everything that was available and studied the letters from attorneys specializing in SSD. Good luck to you, and please keep us all posted on how you do.
    Kathryn
  3. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    I live in Florida, not California, and I've been on SSDI since 1986, so I'm not sure how much my info will help you....
    My lawyer told me that my college degree would make it much harder for me to get disability, so I brought it up with the Admin. Law Judge myself at the end of the hearing when they asked if I had anything to add, and told him that so many people have the same degree as me that someone with a health problem will never get hired, when there are about 300 applicants for every opening. He seemed to buy it (and it was the truth).
    My lawyer also told me my young age would work against me, because they hate to pay for so long. I was 35 at the time.
    I was told to come to the hearing looking as awful as possible. I borrowed a navy shirt from my mom-in-law since I look awful in that color, I pulled my hair back into a bun at the base of my neck. I wore no make-up and powdered my face with white body powder. My husband freaked when he saw me! I wore both of my wrist splints and one of my knee braces.
    In the end, the lawyer said he thought it was two things that swayed my case. One was the letter my Rheumy wrote describing all the things I could not do, and attaching a copy of The American College of Rheumatology's Criteria for the Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia, so the Judge would know what the heck it was. The other factor was that I drew a Judge who was retiring in 2 months and did not have to fear his superiors if he gave disability to too many people. My lawyer said they are told to turn down 2/3 who apply or risk losing their positions.
    I did not already have state disability like you do...and nobody knew what fibro was then. I was one of the first 17 people in the USA to get disability for fibro! Back then it always went to the Federal hearing level and only about 11% of Fibro applicants won.
    The point is, I did win my case!
    So, try not to get too nervous and hang in there,
    Klutzo
    [This Message was Edited on 04/28/2003]
  4. JP

    JP New Member

    thank you very much for your advice. I want this to go smoothly.

    jan