HOUSING for CFIDS/FM MCS sufferers?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by victoria, Apr 4, 2006.

  1. victoria

    victoria New Member

    I get the online newsletter from cfuds assoc., cfids.or, a very worthwhile organization... they had this in their current email, thought it may be of interest to many:
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    MCS - Safe Housing Proposed

    For several years, Recreation Health & Wholeness, a nonprofit organization, has been working on the housing needs of people with CFS and Fibromyalgia (FM).

    Toward what they’ve dubbed the PWC Cohousing Project, they have acquired sites in Gloucester, Massachusetts (which is currently being run as a retreat and guesthouse) and in Windsor, South Carolina.

    For economic reasons, the first phase of Recreation Health & Wholeness’ PWC Cohousing project cannot accommodate people with multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS). However, after being inundated with inquiries from the MCS community, the organization has decided to offer one of the South Carolina sites for sale to those who might be interested in forming a group to build an MCS-compatible community.

    This 27-acre piece of land is adjacent to the Aiken Gopher Tortoise Heritage Preserve (http://www.dnr.sc.gov/managed/heritage/aikengopher/description.html), and was acquired after extensive research into both setting and economics.

    In establishing the PWC Cohousing project, Recreation Health & Wholeness has researched low interest financing for qualified low income homebuyers, options for group organization and funding sources for community development. They are also willing to bring their design, planning and development experience to the table to help the MCS community.

    Says founder Judy Warrington, “We would be in a position to act as consultants in this capacity for a similar MCS project.” Warrington also envisions ways a functioning CFS/FM community and an MCS community could work together.

    Among those who’ve contacted Recreation Health & Wholeness inquiring about MCS housing are people who have backgrounds in grant writing, fundraising, marketing, communications, bookkeeping, management, design and floor-planning.

    Says Warrington, “Combining those skills would make the development, building and administration of an MCS housing project easier and more cost effective. We’ve also heard from nutritionists, organic gardeners, physical therapists, yoga instructors and pilates instructors who can help keep the community as healthy as possible.”

    Those interested in purchasing land or starting a group to create an MCS-safe housing project should contact Recreation Health and Wholeness. Warrington asks interested parties to email recreation@adelphia.net and include a telephone number so discussions can begin.

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    Hope you all find this as interesting as I do...

    all the best,
    Victoria
  2. victoria

    victoria New Member

    for Michelle/Libra 55 --

    this didn't get any response when I first posted it - I thought it was quite interesting.

    hope this helps,

    Victoria





    [This Message was Edited on 06/19/2006]
  3. marta

    marta New Member

    Believe it or not, a friend and I have said many times that what we'd like is a "commune-type" of housing for people with this illness. As we see it, each person would have their own little house, or condo I guess it would be, then there would be a main building for meals, a kitchen, a large comfy room with fireplace for socializing, a nursing station, a library, a common garden for those who could participate, a caretaker for the grounds, a housekeeping staff..... oh, we went on and on.

    I don't know what this plan is but it's sure a start!

    Thanks for posting it. I missed it the first time.

    Marta
  4. libra55

    libra55 New Member

    I'm just reading this now since you bumped it. Must have missed it the first time around! Thanks for responding to my post as well.

    I live in Mass. it sure would be close. I wonder if these places would take pets. I couldn't give up my furbabies.

    I'm not self supporting right now. But I'm always gathering information. It never hurts to dream.

    What I miss most is mealtimes. Growing up my mother always cooked nice meals, even though there were only 3 of us we sat down at the table and ate and talked. My house now is so dysfunctional it isn't funny. Husband is barely ever there. when he is he stuffs food in his face as he runs out the door. Or sits by himself in a corner and eats. Daughter #1 is autistic and won't eat 99 percent of what's served, or has meltdowns at the table. it's like a zoo in my house.

    So half the time I eat by myself, or don't eat at all. not a good way to live.

    I have good friends I go out to breakfast and lunch with, but they have their own families and lives. I find myself more and more lonely, and this co-housing idea creeping into my thoughts more frequently.

    Michelle
  5. Jeanne-in-Canada

    Jeanne-in-Canada New Member


    I actually qualified for a 2 bdrm unit, though singles usually get bachelor, but that was available when my name came up on the list. it was only a few mths too. They wouldn't let me move in though when I foolishly admitted I smoked, but only outside.

    They were very spartan looking though. I expected something cottagy looking and cozy, but they were kind of cold and depressing looking. It was all cement walls, there were no closed cupboards or closets and wooden doors everywhere. MCS people tend to be allergic to mould, dust and mites, so that's why the sun has to get in every corner, so mites and moulds can't flourish. And the extra doors led to the back of the fridge and appliances, so you had easy access to keep them clean.

    The duct work was open and electrical outlets were visible, very ulitilarian looking. Even the floors were cement. I expected warm looking hardwood or at least tile. They were townhouses w/ private entrances and large windows at least. And they were out in Barrhaven, an outer suburb of Ottawa, where the air quality is definitely better than the city

    YOu can't have common areas w/ MCS people because they have so many individual allergies and can't share air or common heating and ductwork w/ neighbours. I've ran into that problem more times than I want to say, adn have moved so many times. The person who mentioned commune style, might be fine for the average CSFer, but not for MCS complications.


    Jeanne
  6. aloneandscared

    aloneandscared New Member

    Sadly I have been living with my elderly parents for 2 years now talk about high stress. I live in Missouri and in a small college town, rentals are dumps and ourageous in rent, HUD is a year waiting list. Someway, I will be out inthe next 2 months my son 22 is moving in with me, that is if we find a place. I did hear about the agency of Rural Development for very low income that will assist in providing low interest loans. For what they charge in rent you could make a house payment. As I find out more I will let you know, I have gotten the runawound in this town from so many agencies and who has the energy to go from place to place. Section 8 housing here I would not let my dog if I had one live in a place and STAIRS are a problem. Wish me luck on the quest and hope to find out more on the Rural development issue
  7. victoria

    victoria New Member

    a lot of compromising - if you find compatible people it can work well, but the larger the group, I think the harder it gets. I remember all too well the difficulties with some roommates from my early single days...

    My ideal in this kind of community, well, ANY kind of community lolol, would be to have my own private 'space' where I can't see anyone and nobody can see me, so I don't have to be sociable if I don't want to be....

    but yet be close to a common grounds and center to socialize when I could... and OF COURSE there have to be groundskeepers and housekeepers hehehe! And of course be affordable for everyone!

    (yeah, dream on, lololol!!!)

    I am really interested 'Alone and Scared' about what you might find out about help with rural housing for low-income people - as I explained on your other post, I have some friends in a similar predicament. It would be nice if they could get their own house.

    all the best,
    Victoria




    [This Message was Edited on 06/22/2006]
  8. Rene

    Rene New Member