How does Cymbalta work?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by SpiroSpero, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. SpiroSpero

    SpiroSpero New Member

    Here is a good explanation. Before you read it I want to point out this abstract:

    For depression they are two of the big three neurotransmitters, dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb puts 80% of depression issues somewhere in the realm of serotonin, norepinephrine and/or dopamine. According to the PI sheet Cymbalta (duloxetine hydrochloride) also does a negligible amount of dopamine reuptake inhibition, so like Effexor (venlafaxine) you might be able to get a hit on all three.

    Not all depression issues are solved by these particular neurotransmitters. Presuming it's a biochemical problem in the first place, and not purely a psychological / situational issue (i.e. talking it out is only what you need to do and not take meds), some biochemical depression issues are in the realm of MAO, glutamate, GABA, opiods and/or voltage channels.

    - Comment: Treating depression is not as easy as media tells us. Biochemical depression can have lots of ways to induce depression. -

    http://www.crazymeds.us/cymbaltaHowItWorks.html

    "How Does Cymbalta Work In Your Brain: I get the feeling that Cymbalta's original application was for urinary stress incontinence. All of the studies, and not reviews, I've found about how it works are on that subject. Nothing regarding depression or neuropathic pain. At least nothing finished as of this writing. If you really want to know how Cymbalta / Yentreve / Ariclaim (duloxetine hydrochloride) works to prevent urinary incontinence, this study is the clearest, and most recent. It's based on both animal and human models.
    So you're stuck with the generic version regarding all Multiple Reuptake Inhibitors, Cymbalta (duloxetine hydrochloride) doesn't make you produce more serotonin and norepinephrine, rather it makes your neurons soak for a longer period of time in the serotonin and norepinephrine you already produce.

    But is that the same thing?

    That depends on the person and the sensitivity of your 5Ht and alpha 1 & 2 receptors. Sometimes it's the same effect, sometimes not. When not it could be sub-par (to the point of being useless) or too much.

    For depression they are two of the big three neurotransmitters, dopamine. My wild-ass guess / rule of thumb puts 80% of depression issues somewhere in the realm of serotonin, norepinephrine and/or dopamine. According to the PI sheet Cymbalta (duloxetine hydrochloride) also does a negligible amount of dopamine reuptake inhibition, so like Effexor (venlafaxine) you might be able to get a hit on all three.

    Not all depression issues are solved by these particular neurotransmitters. Presuming it's a biochemical problem in the first place, and not purely a psychological / situational issue (i.e. talking it out is only what you need to do and not take meds), some biochemical depression issues are in the realm of MAO, glutamate, GABA, opiods and/or voltage channels.

    Remember, even if you do need meds, you still need to talk it out with a therapist and a support group.

    As far as neuropathic pain goes, it's some combination of rebuilding nerve tissue and the additional marinating of your neurons in those neurotransmitters providing a form of pain relief. I still need time to do some more research and give you some real answers backed up by real studies. I still suck.

    Cymbalta's Half-Life: An average of 12 hours in a range of 8-17 hours.

    Days to Reach a Steady State: Three days."

  2. cfsgeorge

    cfsgeorge New Member


    Now one knows how cymbalta or any AD works not even the manufacturers. It says so straight from the manufacturer, "XXXXX has an unknown mechanism..........."

    Not only do you not have a blood test, but these AD's are made with an "unknown mechanism" to treat disabling and life-threatening diseases of unknown cause and pathophysiology. Think about that hard. Putting it into laymens terms, you have no lab test(blood/urine) to confirm the use of a drug(antidepressant) with which no one knows how it works for a disease no one knows.
  3. SpiroSpero

    SpiroSpero New Member

    they don't know how it works exactly but they know that it stops the re-uptake of serotonin.

    I'm really careful with every brain-metabolism-altering substance (I don't take any) but if someone suffers under depression or pain or low dopamine and is helped by Cymbalta or Ritalin then you have no right to force him off of it just because you think it could be bad in the long run. I clearly see your point and I agree that everyone should be careful but since we are all individuals and as you said we actually don't know the mechanism behind certain SSRI's then generalizations won't help us.

    Everyone has to decide on his own if the risks are higher than the desired effects.