How many have a relative with MS?

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by kaths, Dec 5, 2002.

  1. kaths

    kaths New Member

    I have CFS and have noted in my one month reading this board that several people have relatives (usually female) with MS. Why do you think that is? My younger sister, 40, was DXed with MS in June.

    Just wondering,
    Kathy
  2. kaths

    kaths New Member

    I have CFS and have noted in my one month reading this board that several people have relatives (usually female) with MS. Why do you think that is? My younger sister, 40, was DXed with MS in June.

    Just wondering,
    Kathy
  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Dear Kathy,

    I believe that many of us suffer from stealth bacterial and/or viral infections which destroy our cells in which they hide and thrive. When the cells die, the infectious parasites drag some of our own DNA from the cells as they enter the bloodstream in search of other cells to invade. If the body recognizes the parasites as foreign invaders, it is likely also to see its own DNA as foreign, and voila, an autoimmune disease ensues.

    Many, many people with Lupus and MS also have FMS. Often the FMS isn't diagnosed until after the Lupus or MS is diagnosed, but I believe it happens the other way around.

    My illnesses (CFS/FMS) were triggered by a mycoplasma infection 12 years ago and I am fighting this chronic infection with everything I have so as to kill the mycoplasma bacteria before my FMS develops into an autoimmune illness. Many researchers now believe that FMS itself is autoimmune, the body's destroying its own immune system, and that it is progressive.

    This is why it is so important for us to never give up and give in and continue to treat our illnesses as best we can and keep moving until a cure is found.

    Love, Mikie
  4. JP

    JP New Member

    Hi Kathy,

    I have an aunt and uncle (father's siblings) who have MS. I also fear this dx and like many, my symptoms mimic MS symptoms.

    jan
  5. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    The neurons in our brains are overfiring to compensate for misfiring like a bad mechanic who increases the idle in a rough running engine. Eventually, the engine will be destroyed along with the transmission. Our brains are the same way. Damage will ensue unless this seizure state in the brain is brought under control. Dr. Cheney's article on Klonopin explains this very well. It is in our library here.

    MS could also simply be the myelin sheaths wearing away from the damage being done to our neurons by the constant overfiring, although, I believe it is something more which causes the body to attack and destroy the myelin.

    Love, Mikie
  6. 1Writer

    1Writer New Member

    My mother's sister was dx with MS when she was in her early 20's...she's in her 70's now and luckily, one of the few MS victims that isn't totally crippled. She's gone blind in one eye for awhile, lost use of her hand, etc., but only temporary. She moves very very slowly, now...but she moves. The sad thing is, she is an artist. I do think it can't be only coincidence that a lot of us have relatives w/MS. There probably will be a connection found someday. There are just too many similarities.

    1Writer
  7. Newswoman

    Newswoman New Member

    I am worried about the possibility of having MS because my cousin was diagnosed several years ago. I wasn't diagnosed with fibro until April of this year, but I was never tested for MS.
  8. sb439

    sb439 New Member

    who has CFIDS badly has a sister and an uncle with MS.
    Susanne