HYPERCOAGULATION/PLAQUE???

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by nickname, May 22, 2003.

  1. nickname

    nickname New Member

    Does anybody know if the hypergoagulation problem with fibrin is the same as, or anything to do with the build up of plaque in the blood ie leading to clogged arteries, or are these two things entirerly separate. I have m.e. and a hpercoagulation defect as seen on live blood microscopy, but my non m.e. sister has just been diagnosed as having a clogged artery - she went to the specialist as her leg had become withered and had many aches and pains. Any help anyone?
    With thanks - nickname
  2. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    I don't think they are the same thing. I am basing that soley on the fact that I have had a transcranial doeppler ( an ultrasound that looks inside your arteries) done on my neck and was found to have very thick arteries, only 1/3 normal size (which could be from fibrin or from my having had Rheumatic fever). I also was told that I had ZERO plaque build-up, not a smidgen of it anywhere. The doc showed me on the TV screen how my arteries were thick but very smooth, while he said arteries with plaque have rough areas where the plaque builds up. I cannot prove that the smooth thickness I have is due to fibrin, so I may be wrong.
    At any rate, I know taking digestive enzymes will help get rid of fibrin,esp. if you take Bromelain and Pancreatin.
    When I had live blood analysis, I was told I had too much "spontaneous aggregation of platelets". This is a condition that can increase the chance of blood clots, but it is not the same as hypercoagulation. Spontaneous aggregation is often a part of migraine syndrome, and is usually mild enough to be treated with vitamin E, ginkgo, or chondroitin. Did they say you definitely have hypercoagulation, or did they say you have a higher tendency toward getting blood clots? It may not be the same thing at all. I so, ask for clarification.
    Hope I did not confuse you further!
    Klutzo
    [This Message was Edited on 05/22/2003]
  3. nickname

    nickname New Member

    .....I think I agree with you - I think I know that clots and hypercoag are not the same thing although one can have a genetic predisposition to clotting even with the hypercoag defect. I also think that your 'spontaneous aggregation of platelets' means that the blood clumps together - all these things found in m.e. I only say think because this is how I understand it -not a doc either, but after all this research, when do I get my degree??!! Yes, I did definitely have the hypercoag defect on live microscope together with rouleaux shaped blood. Test negative for mycoplasma though on PCR. I've been prescribed Inflazyme Forte which contains the pancreatin and bromelain aswell as other enzymes which should deal with the problem together with my inflammation -fingers crossed - start that this week. Sister definitely has clogged artery (or furred, as doc also called it)due in part to diabetes and her lifestyle 'abuse' over 40years -smoking, drinking eating all the wrong things etc.

    I think where I'm confused is the exact definition of 'plaque' - I think that this is a build up of calcium deposits, but I'm not sure for certain - then anyway, I guess it would be different from fibrin. I'll have to read up.
    With thanks - nickname
    [This Message was Edited on 05/22/2003]
  4. klutzo

    klutzo New Member

    What is Rouleau shaped blood? Are you talking about the extra large red cells some of us have? Or the way some of our red cells look like Pac Man has taken a bite out of them?
    Klutzo
  5. nickname

    nickname New Member

    I was told that rouleaux shape blood means long thin flattened blood cells, as opposed to nice normal round ones - results in oxygen being unable to flow freely thru which contributes to overall problems in m.e./fibro.
    Best wishes - nickname