Hypermobility in women with FM

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by tansy, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. tansy

    tansy New Member

    Hypermobility in women with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Oct 16;:1-3 [Epub ahead of print]

    Ofluoglu D, Gunduz OH, Kul-Panza E, Guven Z.

    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine,
    Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey.

    PMID: 16228925


    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between
    hypermobility and fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) in women.

    Ninety-three women with FS who met the American College of Rheumatology
    criteria for FS and 58 healthy women without FS were included in this
    study. All women were examined for hypermobility by blinded observers using
    the Beighton criteria. The mean age was 43.5+/-9.9 (21-68) and 40.2+/-11.1
    (21-63) years in the FS and control groups, respectively, and the two
    groups were statistically similar (p>0.05).

    The mean Beighton total score was 4.7+/-2.1 and 2.9+/-2.4 in the FS and
    control groups, respectively (p<0.0001). The frequency of joint
    hypermobility was 64.2% in the FS group and 22% in the control group. In
    accordance with the Beighton criteria (p<0.05), we found that the joint
    hypermobility ratio was significantly higher in patients with FS than in
    subjects without FS. Additionally, we evaluated the correlation between the
    total Beighton score and the age and number of trigger points. There were
    negative correlations between the total Beighton score and the age
    (r=-0.42, p<0.001) and number of trigger points (r=-0.24, p=0.03) in all
    patients.

    Hypermobility syndrome is more common in women with FS than in those in the
    control group. Therefore, the relationship between hypermobility and FS
    should be taken into consideration in the diagnosis and follow-up of women,
    especially those with widespread pain.

    Clin Rheumatol. 2005 Oct 16;:1-3 [Epub ahead of print]

    Ofluoglu D, Gunduz OH, Kul-Panza E, Guven Z.

    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine,
    Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey.

    PMID: 16228925


    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between
    hypermobility and fibromyalgia syndrome (FS) in women.

    Ninety-three women with FS who met the American College of Rheumatology
    criteria for FS and 58 healthy women without FS were included in this
    study. All women were examined for hypermobility by blinded observers using
    the Beighton criteria. The mean age was 43.5+/-9.9 (21-68) and 40.2+/-11.1
    (21-63) years in the FS and control groups, respectively, and the two
    groups were statistically similar (p>0.05).

    The mean Beighton total score was 4.7+/-2.1 and 2.9+/-2.4 in the FS and
    control groups, respectively (p<0.0001). The frequency of joint
    hypermobility was 64.2% in the FS group and 22% in the control group. In
    accordance with the Beighton criteria (p<0.05), we found that the joint
    hypermobility ratio was significantly higher in patients with FS than in
    subjects without FS. Additionally, we evaluated the correlation between the
    total Beighton score and the age and number of trigger points. There were
    negative correlations between the total Beighton score and the age
    (r=-0.42, p<0.001) and number of trigger points (r=-0.24, p=0.03) in all
    patients.

    Hypermobility syndrome is more common in women with FS than in those in the
    control group. Therefore, the relationship between hypermobility and FS
    should be taken into consideration in the diagnosis and follow-up of women,
    especially those with widespread pain.
  2. ephemera

    ephemera New Member

    Very interesting to see this, especially as 3 years ago I was dismissed by a geneticist for not having a high enough Beighton score to interest him & his staff.

    As I didn't have EDS I was told there was nothing they could do for me, nor were they interested in my case history, my pain, my life. Yadda, Yadda...I walked out & never went back as who needed their arrogance.

    Early on into my pain progression I was consumed with trying to identify what pain was HM, what was FM & then later what was CFS. Later I eased up on myself & grew to accept the different levels & kinds of pain had little or no relation to what caused it. The pain just was.

    Thanks for the discussion point.