I bet doctors just hate....

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by lisjhn, Dec 12, 2002.

  1. lisjhn

    lisjhn New Member

    I wonder how many doctors don't like the fact that the internet came along. Some of us patients are much more knowledgeable now and I wonder if we might intimidate them a bit.

    I know if I went through all that med school and a patient of mine was just yacking out parts of illnesses and their tests and meds used and side effects and stuff...I might feel a little useless. I don't know.

    Obviously they are much more informed with the whole bodily system and all illnesses but not so much the specific ones. Some docs I bet loved it way back when, when they could look in their big ol' medical books and diagnose you with something that didn't exsist and give you a pill that did nothing for you. In the meantime, you get well on your own and think that they were of some big help.

    I'm not putting down docs in any way, but just wondering how they feel when we start talking all our jibberish...

    ~LISA
  2. lisjhn

    lisjhn New Member

    I wonder how many doctors don't like the fact that the internet came along. Some of us patients are much more knowledgeable now and I wonder if we might intimidate them a bit.

    I know if I went through all that med school and a patient of mine was just yacking out parts of illnesses and their tests and meds used and side effects and stuff...I might feel a little useless. I don't know.

    Obviously they are much more informed with the whole bodily system and all illnesses but not so much the specific ones. Some docs I bet loved it way back when, when they could look in their big ol' medical books and diagnose you with something that didn't exsist and give you a pill that did nothing for you. In the meantime, you get well on your own and think that they were of some big help.

    I'm not putting down docs in any way, but just wondering how they feel when we start talking all our jibberish...

    ~LISA
  3. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    My bro in law is a dr and I was running some theories of fibro by him and he flat out said that patients know too much these days, I just dropped it, but my thought was "oh yeah, you dr's liked it better when we were all stupid & we had to believe as much or little as you told us"

    Oh well, I am possibly on the verge thru all my snooping of finding out more about fibro than we were ever told, I will have some interesting posts in the next few days, I have been snooping around in medical journals.

    The can't stop me!

    Jaci
  4. allhart

    allhart New Member

    this was in the american medical journal thought you want to read it
    kara

    Fibromyalgia: Is Recovery Impeded by the Internet?


    In his review article on fibromyalgia, Goldenberg1 stated that "the diagnostic label itself does not promote sickness behavior unless it is used as a substitute for patient information and education." While this may be true of many patients with many illnesses, I think it questionable whether this applies to many sufferers with what is diagnosed as fibromyalgia. It would be a complacent physician who would assume that provision of a diagnosis and some "official" patient information about this disorder would be sufficient to satisfy most patients. In the current state of knowledge about fibromyalgia, the information available often raises more questions in the patient's mind than provides reassurance. The dissatisfaction with the outcome of the consulting process is reflected in the frequency with which second, third, and many other opinions are sought. This "physician-shopping" behavior does not only occur after consultation with skeptical doctors.

    Goldenberg's review overlooks one other important contributor to the fibromyalgia sufferer's worldthe Internet. Increasingly, patients seek to supplement the information given to them by their health care attendants. This is partly a reflection of natural curiosity and partly a manifestation of some patients' distrust of officialdom and of the allopathic approach to health matters. The proliferation of self-help groups for a myriad of diseases and conditions has been catalyzed by the evolution of a medium in which they may thrive. While this may be a good thing in many ways, it also opens the door to those with dubious or frankly dishonest motives and other opportunists to exploit the situation. What is the innocent individual with chronic unexplained pain to make of the vast amount of information available? For instance, a search launched today (November 1999) with the word fibromyalgia using the popular AltaVista search engine returns an astonishing 156 270 links. A casual browse through some of these linked pages provides a confusing array of messages about the condition and its treatment. However, participation in this virtual community may also, I believe, reinforce the view of the person with fibromyalgia that he or she is ill.

    What is to be done about this? The Internet community would resist (quite correctly) any attempt to impose regulations on Web publishing, but, on the other hand, efforts to create an adequate voluntary system to assure quality have so far produced mixed results (Health on the Net Foundation, available at:. Any voluntary code can and will inevitably be broken. One alternative is for the professional community to harness the power of the Internet, ideally in partnership with representatives of patients or the public. The recently announced Medem venture is one promising step in this direction

    A huge amount of Internet traffic is devoted to seeking health care-related information (e-Health), and there is intensifying interest in developing the means to assure quality in e-Health publishing. One other promising development is the announcement of a Summit Meeting on e-Health ethics to be hosted by the Internet Healthcare Coalition, scheduled for February 2000 . It remains to be seen what progress will be made, but the fact that patients will be prominently represented in this meeting gives hope that its recommendations will genuinely influence publishing standards in the future. When that time comes, we as physicians may be able to point our patients to reliable sources of information about their problems that will help promote their recovery.
  5. kadywill

    kadywill New Member

    I visited my Rheumatologist, I told him of my symptoms and history and told him I thought I had FMS. He said, "Well, I guess you've done all the research on the internet, right?" I told him I had and he said, "Good, so I can skip some of the usual and go right on to the exam." And he did and he agreed with *my* diagnosis! I suppose it could have something to do with the fact that I'm a nurse and that I walked in with a big old three ring notebook full of past lab results and reports from other doctors!! I know this can be intimidating to them, but with my lack of memory, this is a must for me! I cannot possibly remember my own meds/dosages/history without this notebook. So, in my case, I got a good reaction from a doctor about my internet research!!
    Love,
    Kady
  6. dlizard

    dlizard New Member

    so I'd say if the system of human healthcare worked* we would have no need to have the internet health care stuff going on.... so which came first the chicken or the egg... fibro patients have long been craving information because WE DON"T GET* medical care.... think about it.. so do I care if my doctor cares if I use this medium to keep me safe from physical harm....notta~ Good luck!
  7. joannie1

    joannie1 New Member

    I know my primary is glad to see I do a lot of research myself and knows I get it off the internet. She will actually write down the name of something and hand me the paper to research it. She says she knows I am well informed and likes the fact that I do the research and hopefully we together with her schoolong and my research can figure out a plan for me.
    However, there are specialists with the big extras behind their names such as orthos, and rheumos, and such that hate the fact that i am so well informed about my conditions and tell me i don't know what I am talking about. However most of the time it is written in my dictations that it is possible. I guess they don't like knowing it doesn't take years of schooling anymore for people to be well informed about some conditions.
    Take care,
    Joannie
    [This Message was Edited on 12/13/2002]
  8. pam_d

    pam_d New Member

    Good discussion! You know what I get tired of, as a patient?? A doctor who looks at me, rolls his (or her) eyes, and says, VERY condescendingly, "Well, I guess SOMEBODY'S been looking on the internet!" As though, being the lowly non-medically educated patient that I am, I don't have the brains to get my internet information from recognized medical universities or hospitals, legitimate medical journals or studies---as though I couldn't possibly figure out that many websites are simply trying to sell me something, and therefore are biased, and that information from those sources shouldn't be given much credibility. That's the kind of doctor I'm sick of!!!! I haven't encountered too many like Kady has----she's lucky to have one who recognizes that she has the intelligence to research her disease without being swayed by the flashing internet "cure-all of the month"! I want this doctor!

    Hugs,
    Pam
  9. karen2002

    karen2002 New Member

    I have gotten those raised eyebrows from many of the specialists I have seen.
    Thank Goodness--the Doc I am now seeing prefers proactive patients. As a matter of fact, he enjoys discussing aspects of fibro I have run across, and is well informed, so I never can perplex him, lol. Makes for good dialog, as his theories often lead me to re-evaluate mine.
    He has often sent me to web-sites to view studies he, himself has found interesting.
    I am counting my lucky stars,
    Karen
  10. mightyslo

    mightyslo New Member

    because you might have done more research than they have.

    The internet is like a second opinion on what your symptoms might mean.

    I think people are saving their own lives these days by getting information on the net that they may have felt foolish instead of seeing a doctor.

    With the medical cost cutting and 15 minutes they are paid for an exam they need all the help they can get.

    Mslo