I Remember Me Video

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by kellbear, Apr 2, 2003.

  1. kellbear

    kellbear New Member

    Hello all

    I am thinking about forking over the 35.00 for the video. I think it would be good for my family and boss to see this so they can better understand the illness. What do you think?
  2. turtis

    turtis New Member

    this is new tome can you explain what this is ?

    thanks ,

    kurt
  3. tandy

    tandy New Member

    I've heard alot about the video.BTW its a true story written by a woman who suffers herself from CFS. I'll have to break down and buy it!!I had a couple offers of someone making me a copy but that never panned out~ Oh well....was it the thought that counts?lol I hear its really worth viewing!(and I have FM...but to me they're so much alike,whats the difference!!it'll give my family an idea anyway.I'm sure as close as you can get)
    Have a great day!(I believe its a little cheaper at buy.you know what)subtle?
  4. wings1

    wings1 New Member

    Hello

    I have never heard of this movie, but would be very intersted in seeing it. Where do you get it? Store? Online? I need something to help my family understand better.

    God Bless
    Wings1
  5. turtis

    turtis New Member

    you can find more info at irememberme.com

    turtis
  6. kellbear

    kellbear New Member

    That would be awesome. Give me your email and I will give you my address
  7. tandy

    tandy New Member

    I'd be interested in a copy of this documentary.I can pay for the tape and S&H.Let me know on here.I cannot seem to get my hands on one~Thanks!
  8. kellbear

    kellbear New Member

    You can buy the video online. Type in "I Remember Me" in a search engine and you will find their website.. It tells you how to order the tape
  9. VickyB

    VickyB New Member

    I bought this video on Amazon.com (used). This video helped my family to visually see how CFIDS can effect a person. I am very glad I bought it!! I did not have to pay full price either.
  10. Plantscaper

    Plantscaper New Member

    and they most certainly did..but I have to wait for 3-6 weeks to see it....I think everybody should ask their library for this, so it will be widely available...I ,usually have been very successful with my library on that account..

    [This Message was Edited on 04/07/2003]
  11. kalina

    kalina New Member

    Just wanted to tell you about my experience with this film…

    I bought a video copy of "I Remember Me," hoping to finally be able to show my friends and family what living with CFIDS is really like. When I first got it and viewed it at home with my husband, I had mixed feelings. I understood and identified with the director's intent to show this illness as it affects her, but it also seemed that part of the story was missing.

    However, forging ahead with my plan to create CFIDS awareness all around, I showed this movie to my mom, who is the only supportive person I have after my husband. She doesn't know much about CFIDS, but is open to learning more. After watching the film, she was confused about several points that the film didn't make clear enough. Watching it also really upset her. So I wrestled with my guilt about making my mom feel so sad, but at least it helped me to communicate with her about what I was going through.

    Next, I gave it to one of my two friends to watch. The few times I've tried to talk to this friend about my illness she has changed the subject, so I was really hoping that seeing this film would help open up a dialogue between us. When she returned the videotape later, she didn't say a word, so I asked her what she thought. She was very close to actually being angry with me because I had asked her to watch something she described as "uncomfortable" and "depressing." This wasn't the dialogue I had hoped for, and she had no desire to discuss it further.

    I'm not saying my friend's blunt reaction was justified -- it hurt. On the other hand, it made me go back and look at the film again from the viewpoint of somebody who didn't know anything about the illness, and I can see how easily it could be misconstrued.

    I don't think the film's director, Kim Snyder, did as much as she could have done to explain the illness. While she did interview PWCs and doctors who are experts in the field of CFIDS research, she also gives plenty of time to skeptical doctors, columnists, and even people she came across in the streets who believe in variations on the "all in your head" theory. Rather than making a commitment to presenting the information from a pro-CFIDS point-of-view, she just casually throws these differing viewpoints up and lets them stand on their own, ultimately leaving it open to the viewers to draw their own conclusions. When describing her own symptoms, she seems to focus way too much on describing the depression that accompanies CFIDS, which only hurts the credibility of this illness and creates further confusion for the uneducated viewer. The film also fails to mention most of the debilitating symptoms we experience (she does cover the fatigue and depression well enough), and misses the opportunity to support our case with hard scientific evidence.

    I won't be showing this film to anyone else as an introduction to CFIDS. It's fine if the director just wanted to make a "personal statement," but I think that as an educational tool, "I Remember Me" fails. I'm curious to know if anyone else has had a negative reaction to this film.

    Kalina
  12. dannybex

    dannybex Member

    I too admire the director for the effort she went through putting this documentary together, but like Kalina, I too found it tended to emphasize the negative, (which of course there are many!) rather than focus on hope and those that have recovered. She rounded up a group of women who had "the thing" as they called CFIDS back in the late fifties, and had eventually recovered, but didn't ask them HOW they recovered. Very disappointing.

    Save your money, and your time, and try to spend more time around positive thoughts (I KNOW it's hard!) and positive treatments that have helped others.

    Dan