IgG ELISA Food Intolerance Test

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Gly, Dec 22, 2005.

  1. Gly

    Gly New Member

    Has anyone had the York Nutritional Laboratory's IgG ELISA Food Intolerance Test done? It tests for delayed reactions to 113 foods.
  2. Gly

    Gly New Member

    Did you feel a lot better after eliminating gluten, lactose and soy from your diet?
    [This Message was Edited on 12/22/2005]
  3. LISALOO

    LISALOO New Member

    I did use York for the 113 foods. Honestly, I didn't see much of a change when I dropped the foods they said I was allergic to. No changes in sinuses, fatigue.
  4. Gly

    Gly New Member

    Thank you! That's the sort of information I'm looking for. I'm sorry that you weren't helped by eliminating the foods, though.
  5. alaska3355

    alaska3355 New Member

    for his CFIDS, and I haven't noticed a big change from him avoiding those foods. I really only notice problems from MSG, aspartame and other excitotoxins. They really make him sick. So I have been allowing more of the "forbidden" foods in his diet. I will admit that his skin is clearer when he is avoiding those foods....
  6. Gly

    Gly New Member

    Yes, I've had a bone density scan done. I have osteopenia in my hip and lumbar spine. T-score for lumbar spine is -2.4. I take quite a bit of Vitamin D in addition to calcium, magnesium and other vitamins and minerals.

    I haven't had stomach problems before but I got an Actonel tablet stuck in my esophagus. After that I had problems with acid reflux, etc. Now I'm on Nexium to heal up before I try the next thing.

    So, you have pain from osteoporosis? Is that from fractures in your spine? You poor thing! Pain is what I'm trying to avoid. Well, more pain that is.

    Thanks to this site, I found out about silent celiac disease and was able to find and print out a paper from a "reputable source" for my doctor about it. Just as he was going to deny me the test, I handed him the paper. He hadn't heard about silent celiac and the connection to osteoporosis. He added the test on my lab request form.

    I had blood taken to check my parathyroid hormone level, too.

    I did check out celiac.com. That's how this whole thing started, and that's where I read about Entero Labs. I'm in Canada though and it would be a big deal for me to pay for a test from them out of pocket. I would have to be sure it's worth it. So I'll wait to see what my blood tests show.

    Yeah, the problem with being tested for food sensitivities is that they can change by the time you get your test results back. I don't think I'll bother with York's test.

    Hugs back atcha, Nancy!
  7. Gly

    Gly New Member

    It must be so hard to watch your son suffering from CFIDS. Thanks for the information about his results following diet change after the ELISA test.
  8. Gly

    Gly New Member

    All this advocating on my own behalf is exhausting and painful but necessary, I know. So Entero labs sounds good. I'll wait and see if my blood test shows anything. If not, I'll have to look further into tests for celiac.

    Is your pain in your upper or lower spine? I'm no stranger to back pain myself (upper and lower) but I don't think I've had any fractures. I'm very afraid of the pain and disfigurement of spinal compression fractures.

    I stopped right after reading your message and prayed for your spine. May your osteoclasts slow down and your osteoblasts get to work to form new, strong bone!

    Now I need to get off this pain machine and have my snack and get on my treadmill (literally and figuratively).
  9. Shannonsparkles

    Shannonsparkles New Member

    I've held off on getting allergy testing done because the low accuracy rate of the standard tests (RAST blood test and scratch test). RAST is 40% accurate - just slightly below the standard "coin toss" test. ;)

    How accurate is the ELISA test? And how does it work?
    Thank you! :)
  10. LISALOO

    LISALOO New Member

    Is supposed to be 90% accurate. Maybe I was in the 10%. As far as what they do, they send you a package, you poke yourself with a little needle/razer, put blood on a little stick until it's full (a couple of drops). Fed Ex it in the package they give you.
  11. LISALOO

    LISALOO New Member

    Is supposed to be 90% accurate. Maybe I was in the 10%. As far as what they do, they send you a package, you poke yourself with a little needle/razer, put blood on a little stick until it's full (a couple of drops). Fed Ex it in the package they give you. You get the results, along with a book in a couple of weeks.
  12. Frecker777

    Frecker777 New Member

    Hey all,
    I am afraid the accuracy of many of these labs has been challenged by studies demonstrating far too many false positives and unreliable results—some labs were sent the same blood sample many times and gave profoundly different results each time. The problem is many of us have faulty digestion and our food may not be totally broken down making us more prone to these false positives (I could probably locate the studies if anyone is interested).

    Nevertheless, in the past, I have had ELISA food allergy tests with great success—avoiding the foods helped with asthma, fatigue, you name it. Unfortunately, recent tests have shown too many foods and a lack of improvement. I actually used York labs specifically this last time (didn’t feel like paying through a doc) and it pretty much listed every veggie known—with all my present restrictions, I just couldn’t realistically incorporate the suggestions into my diet. Let me know what you decide.
    Best,
    Carrie
  13. Shannonsparkles

    Shannonsparkles New Member

    Sorry there were too many foods on your 'no' list to really make things work with it, so you have to eat things on your 'not-okay' list. Have you tried using a rotation diet? You cycle your meals so that you only eat the same thing once every four days. It makes the allergens have less of an impact on you, and prevents you from getting allergic to other things from eating them too often.

    Yes, I wonder if ELISA would be a useful thing for me. I eat only a handful of types of food at present (a few kinds of vegetables, nuts and fish), so if anything new I add in is a problem, I notice it. And I rotate my meals. I've had to gove up SO many foods with this illness... that I wouldn't want to give up anything more because of a false positive. And if I give something up, I don't know of another safe food I can replace it with.