klonopin used with vicodin

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by stschn, Dec 10, 2009.

  1. stschn

    stschn New Member

    I have to have knee replacement and they want to give me vicodin. Will the two mix? I read and now I can't fine it of course some where on line that it wouldn't. Yet I have two M.E. friends that have or do take it together- one for 22 years. Any imput from you own experience? Thanks Joyce.
  2. cathugs

    cathugs New Member

    Hi, Joyce. I take these meds. together, and have for several years. I have never had a problem with mixing them.

    I take the Vicodin 750mg. three times a day and the klonopin is a very low dose. I take 1/2 of a 0.5 mg. three times a day.

    Good luck with your knee replacement. I have had both of mine done. I am so proud of my new knees. I had my rt. one done in Oct. of '06 and the left in Sept. of '07.

    They gave me dilaudid and percocet for my pain. I guess
    because I was already on the vicodin that it would not be strong enough for the post op. pain.

    Please keep us updated on your replacement and recovery.
    I can walk all day without any knee pain, but the pain every where else does me in. LOL

    ((((((((((((cathugs))))))))
  3. cathugs

    cathugs New Member

    Hi, Joyce. I take these meds. together, and have for several years. I have never had a problem with mixing them.

    I take the Vicodin 750mg. three times a day and the klonopin is a very low dose. I take 1/2 of a 0.5 mg. three times a day.

    Good luck with your knee replacement. I have had both of mine done. I am so proud of my new knees. I had my rt. one done in Oct. of '06 and the left in Sept. of '07.

    They gave me dilaudid and percocet for my pain. I guess
    because I was already on the vicodin that it would not be strong enough for the post op. pain.

    Please keep us updated on your replacement and recovery.
    I can walk all day without any knee pain, but the pain every where else does me in. LOL

    ((((((((((((cathugs))))))))
  4. hollie9

    hollie9 New Member

    I've had both knees replaced, last one was in April. I took Vicodin and other pain meds with my usual heavy dose of Klonopin with no problems.

    The only problem I have because I use Klonopin and doxepin and have developed a tolerance, is that I wake up during surgery and they have to knock me out again. Regular doses of anasthesia apparently aren't enough. I always tell the anasthesiologist I will need more than normal, but keep waking up (I've had both hips resurfaced too).

    It isn't a problem, waking up, because I've had an epidural so feel no pain, and because they've given me Versed or Demerol I always feel I'm at a party when I wake up and begin talking a lot to the surgeon, having a great time. I've also had problems when I first awake from surgery, I feel so good from the anasthesia I grab my cell phone and call EVERYBODY in my contacts and speak gibberish. And I don't remember it the next day.

    Good luck with your TKR, I'm at 7 months and they feel like my own knees although the first two months are kind of tough.

    Hollie
  5. Didoe

    Didoe New Member

    klonopin is prescribed for a number of ailments, psychiatric and physical, I say that because how it is prescribed and used may impact its interaction with vicodin-that is, both can be sedating, extremely so for some people. Vicodin can also have the opposite effect, while alleviating pain, it can induce euphoria-patients abusing vicodin take this euphoria to be a 'high' but for those who live with extreme chronic pain, vicodin does not always have a high, only pain relief.

    blah blah blah-while there isnt specific contraindications, be aware of the effects of each only so you are not caught off guard if feeling very heavy or sedated.
  6. Janalynn

    Janalynn New Member

    The two are often prescribed together depending on the ailment. I'm assuming that the Dr. who is prescribing the Vicodin knows about the Klonopin. When I'm prescribed something I always make sure they know what else I'm taking and even say "is that okay to take with __?", even if there are no actual drug interactions, your Dr. should let you know how the two drugs should make you feel.
  7. stschn

    stschn New Member

    I've done a lot in my life and felt for years that I could fight a dragon and come out the winner. Widowed at 29 years old with four small children suported us without help. First woman on and all male staff (1968) and out produced them all. Ran a business that did over a million dollars a year. Now I'm like a little kid scared to death of this surgury. The man I chose has an excellent rep. but I just don't like him. He's been very clear that he has no belief in this illness. I had sent him some info before my first appointment and when I asked if he had gotten it he said "yes but I didn't read it". My insurance will pay for the CPM if your doctor agrees that it is needed. I know that is a nogood with this jerk so I called the insurance company and they told me to get a letter from another doctor. Thankfully Dr. Montoya will be back at Stanford on the 18 and my surgery will be on the 2l. His assistant said that that lack of belief from other doctors was what frustrated him most. I'v had ME for 23 years and I felt like I was back in 1988. Thanks so much for telling me how your experience went. It's really helped me calm down, I was to the point where I didn't know myself.
  8. hollie9

    hollie9 New Member

    Is he the doc you said you didn't like? Is he the one who doesn't believe in CFIDS?

    First I want you to know that my CFS had very little to no effect on both my knee replacements (6 months apart), and I've also had both hips resurfaced...so I've had lots of major joint surgery. I recovered faster than anyone else I had surgery with, despite my CFS.

    You should know there is a "quad sparing" total knee replacement that makes this surgery so much easier and better, I had it. My OS developed the technique where no quad muscles, ligaments or tendons are cut so you walk out of the hospital with the same quad strength you came in with.

    I spent less than 24 hours in the hospital and walked out unaided to my car and went home. Physical therapy is not needed, although you can have a prescription if you want. No CPM machines, no painful PT to do.

    I don't know where you live but you should investigate if there is any OS who does "quad sparing" near you. It is a learning curve for ortho docs so many don't bother to try to learn it. But it is so worth it.

    I live in California and drove 3 hours to Dr. Coon's office, he has many fly in clients, there is no need to go back to see him after surgery if you don't want to. He has done over 4,000 of these procedures, it's important how many a doc has done...I would not go to any doc that has not done at least 200.

    You might check around to see if any doc near you does quad sparing.

    And, yes, many people are frightened of surgery, particularly if they don't trust their surgeons. I flew from California to South Carolina to get my hips resurfaced by the then top surgeon in the US, I believe the choice of surgeon can make or break the rest of your life.

    Since you said you see Montoya, do you live near Palo Alto? If so, you can easily go to Dr. Coon. He has offices in St. Helena and Red Bluff (most of these top, designing surgeons are connected to smallish hospitals which are kind of "theirs").

    He is the top ortho surgeon for knees (he only does knees) in the US, google him and you'll see. He trains other surgeons in the US and overseas in the quad sparing technique. He charges no more than any other surgeon, in fact maybe less since most of his income is from designing procedures. He is now doing knee resurfacing too, and has finally told me it soon will be a viable alternative to knee replacement.

    I am on many TKR sites and have read horror stories about surgeon error, do yourself a favor and go to Dr. Coon. I am 8 months out from last knee surgery and will be wearing high heels tonight and climbing stairs and dancing in them with no problem. I had 140 degree flexion at 3 weeks.

    See these:


    http://www.zoominfo.com/people/Coon_Thomas_178138532.aspx

    In the article, which will appear in the upcoming issue of "Seminars in Arthroplasty," lead author Thomas M. Coon, M.D., describes a number of benefits associated with minimally invasive knee procedures, such as reductions in hospital resource utilization—including reductions in hospital length of stay and in blood transfusions—and improvements in immediate post-operative mobility and range of motion. Dr. Coon is the director of the Orthopedic Surgical Institute, Red Bluff, California.
    ...
    "The clinical and economic benefits of minimally invasive hip replacement have been established in the literature, and we believed that minimally invasive knee replacement would produce the same positive results," said Dr. Coon.

    Dr. Coon's website: http://www.osiresearch.com/
    His site includes interviews with him and patients.

    You will trust him!

    Hollie

  9. hollie9

    hollie9 New Member

    The main way CFIDS can get in the way of TKR recovery, is the hours of physical therapy to get back your quad strength. Has your surgeon told you how much is required of a regular TKR recovery? I would be way to tired to go through that. Thank goodness I didn't have to because I had quad sparing TKR and only had to do simple bed exercises right at first. Then just walk as much as you can.

    The other way CFIDS effected my recoveries is that I kept developing sensitivities to pain meds. I can't take Vicodin, Darvocet, Lyrica, Celebrex or any NSAIDS because they make me hyper and out of it.

    If you go to Dr. Coon you won't have to do all that PT recovery.

    You can email me here if you want to: rosey9932000@yahoo.com

    Hollie
    [This Message was Edited on 12/12/2009]