Latest research, may lead to a cure, here is the article

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by JaciBart, Oct 1, 2002.

  1. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Study links endometriosis with autoimmune, hormone and allergic diseases

    EMMA ROSS
    Canadian Press


    Friday, September 27, 2002
    ADVERTISEMENT


    LONDON (AP) - Women with endometriosis - a leading cause of infertility in which tissue from the womb lining grows elsewhere in the body - are much more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and allergies, new research has found.

    The study, published this week in the journal Human Reproduction, is the first to document something that has been noticed by many women with the painful disorder.

    The researchers urged doctors to look for the other diseases in women when diagnosing endometriosis, which afflicts between eight per cent and 10 per cent of women of childbearing age.

    The cause of endometriosis, as well as of the other diseases, remains unknown.

    The new research suggests an immune system abnormality may underlie all these conditions, said Warren Nothnick, a University of Kansas professor of obstetrics and gynecology who was not connected with the study.

    "What is the underlying factor, the commonality, between all of these diseases? If we can find out what the one factor is, or group of factors, we can target that and hopefully come up with a way to treat not only the endometriosis, but also some of the other diseases," Nothnick said.

    His own work, as well as that of other scientists, suggests that the malfunctioning of certain immune system chemicals called cytokines may be a common link.

    Assuming endometriosis occurs before the other diseases, it may also be possible one day to spare women with endometriosis from developing some of the additional diseases, Nothnick said.

    The study, conducted by scientists at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, George Washington University and the Endometriosis Association, involved 3,680 women with endometriosis.

    The scientists found that 20 per cent of the women had more than one other disease. A third of the women who had other diseases had fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, and some of those women also had other autoimmune or hormone diseases.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome was more than 100 times more common than among the general U.S. female population.

    Hypothyroidism, which involves an underactive thyroid gland and causes mental and physical slowing, was seven times more common.

    Fibromyalgia, which is characterized by widespread body pain and tiredness, was twice as common among the women with endometriosis.

    Autoimmune inflammatory diseases - systemic lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis - also occurred more frequently than normal.

    Rates of allergic conditions were higher, too. While allergies occur in 18 per cent of U.S. women, they occurred in 61 per cent of the women with endometriosis. The rate climbed even higher if the women had additional diseases.

    The study also confirmed previous findings that there is typically a 10-year gap between the time women first get the pelvic pain and the diagnosis of endometriosis.

    The most common symptom of endometriosis is pain, especially excessive cramps during menstrual periods or pain during or after sex. Infertility occurs in about 30 per cent to 40 per cent of women with endometriosis.

    Endometrial tissue outside the uterus responds to the menstrual cycle similarly to the way it responds in the uterus. At the end of every cycle, when hormones cause the uterus to shed its endometrial lining, endometrial tissue growing outside the uterus also breaks apart and bleeds.

    However, unlike menstrual fluid from the womb, which is flushed from the body during menstrual periods, blood from the misplaced tissue has no place to go. Tissues surrounding the area of endometriosis may become inflamed or swollen.

    It is one of the most complex and least understood gynecological diseases and, despite many theories, the cause remains unknown.

    One theory is that during menstruation some of the menstrual tissue backs up through the fallopian tubes into the abdomen, where it implants and grows.

    -

    On the Net:

    Endometriosis Association, endometriosisassn.org

    Endometriosis Research Center, endocenter.org












  2. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    Study links endometriosis with autoimmune, hormone and allergic diseases

    EMMA ROSS
    Canadian Press


    Friday, September 27, 2002
    ADVERTISEMENT


    LONDON (AP) - Women with endometriosis - a leading cause of infertility in which tissue from the womb lining grows elsewhere in the body - are much more likely to have rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and allergies, new research has found.

    The study, published this week in the journal Human Reproduction, is the first to document something that has been noticed by many women with the painful disorder.

    The researchers urged doctors to look for the other diseases in women when diagnosing endometriosis, which afflicts between eight per cent and 10 per cent of women of childbearing age.

    The cause of endometriosis, as well as of the other diseases, remains unknown.

    The new research suggests an immune system abnormality may underlie all these conditions, said Warren Nothnick, a University of Kansas professor of obstetrics and gynecology who was not connected with the study.

    "What is the underlying factor, the commonality, between all of these diseases? If we can find out what the one factor is, or group of factors, we can target that and hopefully come up with a way to treat not only the endometriosis, but also some of the other diseases," Nothnick said.

    His own work, as well as that of other scientists, suggests that the malfunctioning of certain immune system chemicals called cytokines may be a common link.

    Assuming endometriosis occurs before the other diseases, it may also be possible one day to spare women with endometriosis from developing some of the additional diseases, Nothnick said.

    The study, conducted by scientists at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, George Washington University and the Endometriosis Association, involved 3,680 women with endometriosis.

    The scientists found that 20 per cent of the women had more than one other disease. A third of the women who had other diseases had fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome, and some of those women also had other autoimmune or hormone diseases.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome was more than 100 times more common than among the general U.S. female population.

    Hypothyroidism, which involves an underactive thyroid gland and causes mental and physical slowing, was seven times more common.

    Fibromyalgia, which is characterized by widespread body pain and tiredness, was twice as common among the women with endometriosis.

    Autoimmune inflammatory diseases - systemic lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis - also occurred more frequently than normal.

    Rates of allergic conditions were higher, too. While allergies occur in 18 per cent of U.S. women, they occurred in 61 per cent of the women with endometriosis. The rate climbed even higher if the women had additional diseases.

    The study also confirmed previous findings that there is typically a 10-year gap between the time women first get the pelvic pain and the diagnosis of endometriosis.

    The most common symptom of endometriosis is pain, especially excessive cramps during menstrual periods or pain during or after sex. Infertility occurs in about 30 per cent to 40 per cent of women with endometriosis.

    Endometrial tissue outside the uterus responds to the menstrual cycle similarly to the way it responds in the uterus. At the end of every cycle, when hormones cause the uterus to shed its endometrial lining, endometrial tissue growing outside the uterus also breaks apart and bleeds.

    However, unlike menstrual fluid from the womb, which is flushed from the body during menstrual periods, blood from the misplaced tissue has no place to go. Tissues surrounding the area of endometriosis may become inflamed or swollen.

    It is one of the most complex and least understood gynecological diseases and, despite many theories, the cause remains unknown.

    One theory is that during menstruation some of the menstrual tissue backs up through the fallopian tubes into the abdomen, where it implants and grows.

    -

    On the Net:

    Endometriosis Association, endometriosisassn.org

    Endometriosis Research Center, endocenter.org












  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    Thanks for this article. I have a young friend who has this condition and has had a horrible time getting pregnant. She miscarried her first pregnancy but is getting ready to deliver a daughter in Dec. Her Mother has FMS.

    The government had better start funding research into the immune system in a much broader sense if it doesn't want a nation of sick people. They never cared about AIDS when they thought it was just a "gay" or "drug user" disease. They have never cared about funding research for CFS and FMS because they thought it was a "hysterical women's illness, all in our heads." Things are getting to epidemic proportions and still, no aggressive research coming from our government. How many of us will be on disability instead of being contributing members of society before they get it?

    It won't happen in this administration. Dubya is too busy sabre rattling while the economy goes to hell in a handbasket to worry about medical research. I have a feeling that history will repeat itself when people are chanting, "It's the economy, Stupid," just like they did for his father. Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox now.

    Love, Mikie
  4. JaciBart

    JaciBart Member

    but unfortunately the Govt is busy arguing amongst themselves. I never used to be so disgusted with the Govt but since getting this DD and seeing what we all go thru because of ins co's and seeing the secrecy in the Govt ans seeing all they have done to us in terms if causing our diseases and selling live viruses to Saddam!!! How ludicrous. I am so sick of propaganda.

    Re your Soc Sec issue, they turn so many of us down that we cannot easily get it, we have to paint ourselves with yellow pain, add blue polka dots in the left side, purple stripes on our legs, shave our head, tie our legs in knots, sacrifice a virgin, sing yankee doodle dandee, juggle 14 bowling pins at once in front of a crowd of 1000 or more monkeys at 2pm on the 5th tuesday on top our roof.

    Jaci