Mapping when using Guai need explanation

Discussion in 'Fibromyalgia Main Forum' started by Takesha, Aug 15, 2003.

  1. Takesha

    Takesha New Member

    I am just getting around to reading about Guai, and I am reading materials in the library...I can't figure out the lesion thing...Will some one in plain English explain to me what I should be looking for. Question 2, Does Dr Amand believe that CFS/FMS are the same thing? If so does the Guai work for a person with Hypoglcemia and CFS. I have read and reread the articles, the lights are on but no one is at home I guess, because I am reading and saying to myself..DA..What did he just say. Thanks for helping me out.
    Takesha
    I came back to add that I am a thunder thighs..Sigh...and how can to tell the differece between cellulite and a lesion. STOP LAUGHING...LOL...IT'S NOT FUNNY[This Message was Edited on 08/15/2003]
  2. Takesha

    Takesha New Member

    Bump..I am getting ready to call it a day and seen this was getting a little far along on the board.
  3. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    The tender points on the diagrams are where we usually have deposits of debris causing tenderness. A finger poking into this area with a fair amount of pressure will cause you to flinch from the pain. People with just CFIDS do not have these tender points. If they do, they also have FMS.

    Think of you body as a doll. The tender points on the upper arm and thigh are where the doll's limbs would be attached to the body. You just have to poke around until you find them. My pain specialist used to check mine, but not every point and not on both sides. I check my own to ensure that they have gotten better with the Guai. If you find a doc who knows about our illnesses, he or she can map you, but most don't feel it all that necessary.

    I have extra tender spots which are not on the map; many of us do. I've been sick for so long that my body even started depositing debris in my joints causing osteo arthritis.

    Take your time to understand the treatment, get rid of the sals, and tweak the dose until you get to the right dose. Unless you are wanting your whole body mapped, it isn't necessary to the treatment. Just pick a few spots so that down the road, you can compare.

    Love, Mikie
  4. Takesha

    Takesha New Member

    Thank you for clarifing this for me. If the articles I was reading had been so clear I would not have had to post. I figured it would be you who answered my post as I sort of remember you referencing the topic a while back. Thanks, I will go "poke" myself after awhile. lol
    Takesha
  5. Takesha

    Takesha New Member

    That's a great idea....don't suppose this could go into the FMS guide book as foreplay? Just joking...my sense of humor gets out of line very easily these days..
    Takesha
  6. Mikie

    Mikie Moderator

    The first tender points to appear have been the first to get relief in my case. My upper arms and thighs were the worst. I can not pretty much poke around on them without pain. If I were to continue to dig around in those areas, however, eventually they would feel a little tender. I think those areas are like old injuries; they remain a little tender for a long time.

    As far as I can tell, there have been no new spots for about a year now. There seems to be something about passing the first year that markes a real difference.

    A real bonus has been that my osteo arthritis has gotten better, and Dr. St. Amand's co-author, Claudia Merek, R.N., has noticed the same thing. The doc had said that the OA is permanent damage and that the Guai cannot pull debris from the joints.

    There has been a lot of discussion here about whether the Guai works for the reasons theorized by Dr. St. A. I believe that the Guai probably works as he theorized, but that it also works on at least one, if not two, other problems besides just the phosphate debris. That may help explain why my OA improved.

    In any case, the Guai has really helped me and I hope it helps you too.

    Love, Mikie
  7. Takesha

    Takesha New Member

    I have a doc. appt. coming up on the 25th, and plan on discussing a change of meds to him. I am now on Nexium, Celebrex and amitriptylin. I want to get rid on the ami, and start on Klonpin and nuerontin. I have alot of neuro pain and a sleep problem, cause I have a very active mind, and I keep having to up the dose of ami and am now on 100 mg which totally knocks me out for 12 hours or more,and I am getting ready to go back to school in Sept.
    My question...can I take these meds with the quai? I haven't talked to the doc yet about the quai, but will do so when I see him. He has perscribed meds before that don't mix so I kind of keep an eye on what he's giving me.
    I don't remember (and don't want to lose my post by going and checking) but did you answer my question as to whether this treatment works for CFS? If you did, don't worry about answering, becaue I am going to go look as soon as I post this. Thank you.
    Takesha